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Brant Museum re-opens - features a Space Exhibit - starts July 20

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

July 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Things are opening up

Brant Museum transformedThe Brant Museum announced today that they have a special feature on Space that will run from July 20 – September 18, 2021

Health in Space: Daring to Explore is a special exhibition developed by the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, one of three museums under Ingenium – Canada’s Museums of Science and Innovation, in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency.

Brant museum SpaceHealth in Space demystifies the health challenges — such as variable gravity, radiation, and isolation — that astronauts face while living and working in space. Through authentic artifacts and captivating interactive activities, this exhibition will engage visitors to better understand Canada’s role in advancing health research.

Discoveries in this field will be essential for the success of future deep-space expeditions, and may also help solve medical challenges on Earth.

Health in Space also includes video interviews with Canadian astronauts, which offer first-hand insight into their experiences. A special section within the exhibition highlights astronaut David Saint-Jacques’ recent mission, from his selection and training to the experiments conducted while aboard the ISS.

The hours of operation are Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 3:30pm, with COVID-19 protocols and procedures in place to allow the public to safely enjoy the galleries and exhibition.  Visitors can purchase tickets in advance online or in-person.

Museum hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 3:30pm with COVID-19 protocols and procedures in place to allow the public to safely enjoy the galleries and exhibition.

Entrance fee:  

$10 – adults

$8 – seniors

$6 – child

$30 – family (2 adults and up to 4 children)

Free – child under 3

Did you know…

Did you know that David Saint-Jacques was the most recent Canadian to go into space? Before he was an astronaut, he worked as a doctor in Puvirnituq, Nunavik, a remote community in Northern Quebec where he had to make work with minimal resources, just like in space!

Canadarm in space

Canadarm in use – serving the shuttle

Did you know that there is no “up” on the International Space Station (ISS)? The ISS is a small space, so all four walls are covered with workable equipment, therefore, whichever way an astronauts head is pointing is considered “up”. Also, switches have an very visible “On/Off” on them, since there is no “up” to show that it’s on.

Did you know that the Neuroarm was inspired by the same technology and principles at the Canadaarm? The NeuroArm allows surgeons to do very delicate operations while a patient is inside an Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine.

Did you know that Mercury is the smallest plant in our solar system? It is only about 40% larger than the Earth’s moon.

Did you know that astronauts go swimming to train for spacewalks? Floating in space is a lot like floating in water. Astronauts practice spacewalks underwater in a large swimming pool and train seven hours in the pool for every one hour they will spend on a spacewalk!

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