SOLO will be on stage in Burlington December 7th at the Performing Arts Centre doing Seasonal numbers with a 50 member chorus.

By Staff

November 4th,  2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A big big sound.

On stage at the Performing Arts Centre on December 7th

The Southern Ontario Lyric Opera company will be featuring Seasonal music along with two short classic operettas by Measha Brueggergosman-Lee

Seldom does Burlington get an opportunity to exceptional voices supported by a very large orchestra.  For those who want to nibble at opera – this is an event worth the time.

 

In May La Traviata (The Fallen Woman) an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave will be presented.

It is based on La dame aux Camélias (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas.

 

 

Tickets at the Box Office

The event is produced by the Southern Ontario Lyric Opera

 

 

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Applications to run an outdoor neighbourhood ice rink now available

By Staff

October 4th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There was a layer of frost on the windshield this morning. Winter weather is getting close and that means ice rinks.

The city today announced that applications to run an outdoor neighbourhood ice rink now available

If you want a local rink – be in touch with Parks and Recreation.

Neighbours are encouraged to come together to maintain outdoor community ice rinks this winter at select locations throughout the city. Applications for the Neighbourhood Rink program are available now at burlington.ca/neighbourhoodrink and are due by Oct. 31, 2022.

Groups looking to organize a neighbourhood rink at pre-approved locations will need a minimum of six people from their community to maintain the rink. Volunteers who are approved to move forward with their rink will need to agree to the terms and conditions set out in the Neighbourhood Rinks program, agree to complete training and agree to keep maintenance records of the rink and provide their own water source.

City staff will install rink boards, hoses and tarps in each location and provide a training manual with tips on ice maintenance. As the colder weather arrives, each neighbourhood group will flood the rinks to get them ready for a first skate and then maintain them throughout the winter.

Neighbourhood rinks are open to all community members to skate for free.

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HOW COULD BURLINGTON COUNCIL ALLOW SUCH INCOMPETENCE?

By Anne Marsden

October 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Click  Let’s End the MMW Era   

December 19, 2016 will be a Council meeting my husband Dave and I will never forget for two reasons.

1. The misrepresentation in the December 14, 2016 Audit Committee Minutes of what really happened at the Audit Committee regarding an audit of the 2014 Election Nomination Papers, was approved by all Council members regardless of having an understanding that the minutes were incorrect.

2. A without notice removal of the definitions of accountability and transparency from the 2014 Procedure By-laws proposed by a group that included Ward 2 Councillor Marianne Meed Ward and a representative of the Clerk’s Office, was unanimously approved by Council.

It took five months for the definitions referenced in paragraph 2 above to form the core of an approved corporate policy covering the accountability and transparency definitions that Council unanimously removed from the Procedure. By-law.

Fast forward to the opening of nominations for the 2022 election when we heard commitments by at least one candidate and multiple members of the electorate, to end the MMW (Mayor My Way) era 2010-2022. The Burlington DownTowners in particular announced in the comments section of the Burlington Gazette, this election for the first time Anne Marsden had their vote for Mayor and offered to put up her signs if available.

After 2022 nominations opened, a better way of communicating by the City through the website was announced and implemented without any warning. The new website had huge gaps in information including committee and council webcasts and minutes of the December 14, 2016 Audit Committee and December 19, 2016 Council meeting. Further, the 2018 financial reports of incumbent members of council all running for re-election were missing.

Lisa Kearns the Marsdens Ward 2 councillor refused to address this sudden dearth of information that affected voters becoming fully informed. She claimed it was a Clerk/Marsden issue and announced to numerous email recipients that she had withdrawn from the email conversation on this matter. Strange as it seems what was not missing was the Corporate Policies which is not something the electorate would normally be checking for to determine who would get their vote.

A cursory review showed a dejavue situation the Marsdens had addressed with Council in the past. “Many corporate policies had passed their due date for review some of them expiring years earlier.”

The 2022 posted Corporate policies identifies the Council Code of Conduct was scheduled for review in October 2022 – a time known, when the date was set, that Council would not be meeting. Although requested in the past no-one has volunteered the information as to what it means when review dates of corporate policies have expired, or what the liability is attached to such expiration.

We all know however, what is behind these expiries – sheer incompetence and lack of accountability. This incompetence in my professional career world would have resulted in an immediate removal of this responsibility from my job description and a much lower salary for me to take home, at the very least.

The biggest shocker to the Marsdens, however, post nominations opening was the Review Date on the Corporate Policy headed ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY. The date was April, 2022 and the person responsible? “The City Clerk”! If the Burlington City Clerks over the past decade, two of them, have been unable to handle a simple follow up file to keep a check on such review dates, what can we expect from someone who is responsible for all the policies, legislative requirements etc. that are a part of oversight of a municipal election. An election that gives the winners the right to decide how they spend a $287 million operating budget. Further, how we undertake our responsibilities to all those we serve who put the money in the city’s budget accounts. Let’s also not forget the Clerk is responsible for the Burlington tender process and accurately recording Committee and Council meetings.

The Council approved definitions of accountability and transparency removed from the 2014 Procedure By-law state:

1.1 “Accountability” means the principle that the City of Burlington will be responsible to its stakeholders for decisions made and policies implemented, as well as its actions or inactions.

1.38 “Transparency” means the principle that the City of Burlington actively encourages and fosters stakeholder participation and openness in its decision-making processes. Additionally, transparency means that the City of Burlington’s decision making process is open and clear to the public.

My September 28, 2022 Gazette opinion piece advises my first priority is a full and thorough review of the Procedure By-law. These definitions that should never have been removed will go back into the Procedure By-law through this review with I am sure, a unanimous vote by the elected council. This will then ensure regardless of corporate policy expiry dates that these two definitions are respected as they must be.

The definitions that the MMW (Mayor My Way) era council saw fit to remove from their reference handbook that should be considered their “bible” is now, as far as anyone knows, not a legitimate part of City of Burlington corporate policies.

No wonder those we talk to on the campaign trail have the highest discontent rate Dave and I have ever heard beginning 1997. The discontent is related to lack of: integrity, accountability, transparency, public engagement, public safety, accessibility and much more! October 11 – October 24 we all have an opportunity to state at the ballot box the MMW era must come an end.

Anne Marsden is a candidate for the Office of Mayor

Content paid for by the Committee to elect Anne Marsden Mayor Burlington

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Water Festival returned to Kelso for the grade 5 students - it was a virtual event for grades two students.

By Staff

October 3, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

While the new normal has a few iffy spots to it – the closing of two sections of the Joseph Brant Hospital where Covid19 outbreaks were declared – the Region is slowly finding its way to whatever normal is going to be as we head into that time of year where we spend more time indoors.

Conservation Halton decided it was possible for the Halton Children’s Water Festival to return to Kelso Conservation Area and welcome back over 800 students this year for an in-person program focused on protecting water in our community.

This is the fifteenth year for the festival which has educated over 50,000 elementary school students with the support of over 6,000 high school students over the years.

The objective was to step though each of the tires and keep whatever was in the bucket – in the bucket.

“Today, I’ve learned about water and the correct bins the garbage goes in,” said James, a Grade 5 student from St. Anne Elementary School, Burlington. “Right now, we’re playing a game and it’s really fun!”

The festival offered the Grade 5 students curriculum-linked environmental education programming, over three days, that gave students the opportunity to learn about water and society, water conservation and protection, water health and safety and water science and technology. Fun, themed learning activity centres such as Waterfront Quest, Garbage Juice, What’s That?, the Great pH Challenge and Beneficial Bugs allowed for hands-on learning outdoors where students could enjoy the views of Kelso Reservoir on one side and the Niagara Escarpment on the other.

“The water festival gives our students the opportunity to be stewards of the earth by investigating and participating in real-life, hands-on activities that are designed and lead with the Ontario Science and Technology expectations,” said Clare Slaven, Grade 5 teacher, St. Timothy’s Catholic Elementary School, Burlington. “It is a wonderful fun-filled day where we can  show what we value and celebrate in Halton and the environment.”

The grade 5 students were kept busy – learning how their environment works and the role water plays in everything they do.

A virtual Water Festival Program will continue again this year. Since launching in April 2022  more than 1,600 students have participated in the online field trips.

The Halton Children’s Water Festival is presented by Conservation Halton and Halton Region in partnership with Halton District School Board, Halton Catholic District School Board and Conservation Halton Foundation, with the support of the Town of Oakville, Geo Morphix, City of Burlington and the Town of Halton Hills.

Conservation Halton is the community based environmental agency that protects, restores, and manages the natural resources in its watershed. The organization has staff that includes ecologists, land use planners, engineers, foresters and educators, along with a network of volunteers, who are guided by a Board of Directors comprised of municipally elected and appointed citizens. Conservation Halton is recognized for its stewardship of creeks, forests and Niagara Escarpment lands through science-based programs and services. Learn more at conservationhalton.ca.

 

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National Reconciliation event will include a ceremonial - reflective walk from the Pier to the Canal

By Katelyn Goodwin

September 29th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Friday afternoon, from 4-7 PM, residents, indigenous or otherwise, will be gathering in  Spencer Smith Park to mark the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage and was born in Dog Creek but now lives in Williams Lake, British Columbia.

Also recognized as Orange Shirt Day, Truth and Reconciliation Day is an Indigenous-led grassroots commemorative event inspired by the story of residential school survivor Phyllis Webstad who travels the country raising awareness about the impacts of Canada’s residential school system while talking about her experiences when she was  at a residential school.

Both local Indigenous people and support groups will have public displays set up, interactive events, information booths, and a ceremonial gathering will take place in the park.

People are encouraged to come to the park to learn and participate in these events and displays. Participants wishing to join are encouraged to wear orange shirts.

The path leading to the canal and the lighthouse was once a rail bed that had two tracks that brought steam engines into Burlington where they were loaded with produce that was shipped around the world. The canal is also the border between Burlington and Hamilton.

An event of significance will be a reflective walk which will start at the pier at 4 p.m. and end at the Lift Bridge lighthouse where a ceremony will take place before attendees’ head back to Spencer Smith Park.

City of Burlington administration buildings will be closed. .

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Canadian and Russian online casino legislation: How does it compare?  

By Dan Prefman

September 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Anyone who lives in Burlington knows what a great place it is and what a fabulous country Canada is. With so much natural beauty and so many interesting things to do in your spare time, it is a fabulous place to call home. While playing sports and meeting up with friends is something people all over Burlington love to do, playing online casino games is also popular with many now. This is true across many parts of Canada, where lots of people love to relax with exciting games online.

Of course, online casino gaming is loved in many other parts of the world and Russia is a prime example. Although there might be a shared love for casino gaming online between Canada and Russia, it is fair to say that the legislation both countries have in this area can differ.

But how does Canadian and Russian online casino legislation compare?

Russia has platforms that offer awesome games alongside generous bonuses. And a no nonsense leader keeping an eye on things.

 Russia – What is their online casino legislation?

 The situation around iGaming is a little muddled in Russia – despite it having some very clear-cut laws around online gambling! It is without doubt that legislation passed in 2006 banned online gambling across Russia and further legislation passed in 2009 banned all forms of gambling in the country apart from in four special gambling zones.

This all seems pretty straightforward until you learn that the iGaming sector in Russia remains popular and many people there gamble at online casinos regularly. There are in fact some top online casinos to game at for Russians now and platforms which offer awesome games alongside generous bonuses.

But just how can this be possible with the legislation from 2006 and 2009 in place? It all comes down to many Russians bypassing legislation by playing at offshore casino platforms. Although this is something of a grey area, there is little risk involved for players and plenty of foreign sites who accept Russian users. Of course, it is key to stay updated with any future changes to online casino legislation in Russia which could impact people’s ability to play at offshore sites.

Where does Canada stand on online casino gaming?

 The Canadian online casino market is an interesting one and one that is in a period of change right now. It is estimated that up to 20 million Canadians love to game online and the local online gambling sector pulls in around $1.2bn in revenue.

While regulation from the 1970s paved the way for the first land-based casino in Winnipeg during 1989, updates to laws around online gambling have been a bit slower to emerge. This is because Canada leaves it up to each province to set their own rules around online casino gambling.

As a result, some provinces have been slow to react to the rise of online gaming across the country and slow to pass legislation which could enable people to gamble at online casinos legally in certain provinces. In places like this, many follow the lead of Russia and play at offshore casino sites instead.

Despite this, there have been recent movements in some provinces in terms of legalizing online casino gaming. Ontario’s online gambling market was launched in April 2022 for example, after legislation was passed to make this achievable. This means it is now possible for internet casinos to operate within Ontario provided they have been issued the relevant license by provincial officials.

Ontario is professionally and responsibly regulated. One of the safest environments for on-lime gamblers.

This move by Ontario has led many people to speculate whether other Canadian provinces could follow suit and pass legislation moving forward to launch legal online gambling within their borders. This could soon see Canada fully open for top casino brands to operate legally within the country and see it breaking the glass ceiling around iGaming in the country.

Canada vs Russia – How do they compare?

 In essence, it is clear to see the similarities when comparing online casino legislation between the two countries. Both for example have a nation of people who love to play online casino games, and both turn something of a blind eye to people who game at offshore platforms.

There are also some clear differences between the two though. Russia for example has not passed any recent legislation in this area, while Canada seems to be in a period of change. Russia seems to have set out its stall to be completely against online gambling, whereas Canada’s stance is seeming to soften. Russia also takes a more central, federal approach to setting iGaming laws, while Canada is happy to leave it up to individual provinces.

 

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Library celebrates 150 years  - celebration this Saturday

By Staff

September 15th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is a little short on the notice side but …

On Saturday, September 17th, Burlington Public Library will celebrate 150 years of service to the community.

The Library is marking its sesquicentennial with a big birthday bash at its Central Branch on New St.

“We are so excited to be able to celebrate with the community,” says CEO, Lita Barrie. “The pandemic put so many things on hold, and we are grateful that we get a chance to acknowledge this incredible milestone with a great big party.”

Designed by Hamilton architect Charles Mills and built in 1906-1907 on the west side of Brant Street, south of Ontario Street. Its construction was funded by a $1000 donation by John Waldie, Burlington’s first Reeve and former Member of Parliament. Waldie had moved to Toronto after the death in 1884 of his wife Mary Ann (and the mother of their 13 children), following childbirth. As the founder of the Victoria Harbour Lumber Company, Waldie became immensely wealthy, building a Rosedale mansion for his family, but he did not forget Burlington. On opening day, the new library was stocked with 6,000 books, purchased by Waldie.  The Library was demolished for the construction of a new Town Hall in 1964., 

150 years of history

The library was founded in 1872 when villagers and public-school trustees joined forces to establish a public library service.

It began in a Central Public School hallway, where villagers could stop by for an hour every Friday afternoon to borrow a book.

Thanks to the fundraising efforts of the townspeople, the growing collection soon became too big for its location. For many years, local folks took turns hosting over 2,000 books in their homes and businesses until the first permanent library site opened in 1907.

Since then, the system has grown to seven branches across the city and offers programs, books, and community space to more than 100,000 members.

Bring the whole family

The celebration will run from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. this Saturday. It will feature live music, games, treats, and more. Formal remarks will take place at 11 a.m.

Attendees will also have a chance to contribute to a community art project that will be installed on the third floor of Central Branch later this year.

 

Where and when:

2331 New St. Burlington

Saturday, September 17th

10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

 

 

 

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Library extends hours - an increase of almost 20% since 2018

By Staff

September 12th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Public Library (BPL) is extending its hours. This change takes effect Monday September 12th.

Since 2018, BPL has been able to extend its open hours by nearly 20 per cent.

Some branches, including New Appleby and Aldershot, have seen a 60 per cent increase in open hours since 2018.

Hours have increased – readership as well?

Where and When You Can Visit Starting September 12

Central and Tansley Woods
Monday to Thursday: 9am to 9pm
Friday to Sunday: 9am to 5pm

New Appleby, Aldershot, Brant Hills, Alton
Monday to Thursday: 9am to 9pm
Friday & Saturday: 9am to 5pm
Sunday: Noon to 5pm

Kilbride
Tuesday & Thursday: 5pm to 8pm
Saturday: 9am to 2pm

Burlington Librarian CEO, Lita Barrie.

This change happened because of feedback from our customers. “After receiving customer feedback about a need for increased branch access, included this goal in our 2016-2020 Strategic Plan,” says CEO, Lita Barrie. “We have been gradually increasing service hours since then. Our 2020 and 2022 customer surveys reaffirmed this direction.”

These moderate increases to service hours have not increased the library’s staffing budget, but they have made the library accessible to more people with diverse needs and schedules, and expanded access to BPL’s collection, programs, and spaces.

Customer Feedback and Data Driven Decisions
“We have had great feedback so far about our expanded hours,” adds Barrie. “We are keeping a close eye on our community’s needs by analyzing usage data.”

Weeknight usage from Monday to Thursday significantly increased this spring—192 per cent—during the library’s closing hour from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Borrowing also went up during this period.

This data helped BPL decide how to adjust its open hours to best serve the community.

Library users also told BPL they would like 24/7 access to WiFi so they could use the internet outside branches or in their vehicles during closed hours. This change will also take effect September 12th.

Library Use is the Best Feedback
The library is always looking for feedback. You can share your opinion simply by using your local branch. “We monitor activity at all our locations to help guide decisions about many things, including open hours,” says Barrie. When you visit the library, you are helping us understand trends and needs in our community.

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Foxcroft remembers his time with Queen Elizabeth II - mourns the loss

By Staff

September 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Flags were at half staff throughout the world when news of the passing of Queen Elizabeth II was announced today

He is one of the few people in Burlington who met her, had a conversation with her and remembers her fondly.

Ron Foxcroft was at the time the Honorary Colonel-in-Chief of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada,  When Nathan Cirillo was killed while on duty at the Cenotaph in Ottawa it fell to Ron to preside at the parade held in Hamilton to commentate and honour the young man.

As a result of that event, Foxcroft was presented to Queen Elizabeth II, usually for formal stiff occasion. Ron’s time with the Queen not was stiff or formal.

At one point the Queen, who was the Colonel of the Regiment,  made mention of what the Canadian Geese were doing to her garden and pulled back the drapes in the room and pointed to the garden which was the size of a couple of football fields.

There was a small John Deere mower on the property and the Queen told Foxcroft that she used to to shoo away the geese.

Queen Elizabeth II, in her capacity as Colonel-in-Chief of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, receives Colonel Ronald Foxcroft (Honorary Colonel) at Buckingham Palace in London.

That’s when Foxcroft did what no one is ever permitted to do: h e reached into his pocket and pulled out a Fox40 whistle and told the Queen one blow on the whistle and the geese would be gone.

This afternoon, during a short conversation with Foxcroft who was in Calgary, he commented on the woman he had met who had passed away earlier in the day.

“She was one of the most remarkable women this world has seen, She loved Canada, she loved the military – she was probably the greatest monarch the world has experienced in some time.

“She will be missed – I will miss her.”

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Port Nelson United Church to host an event sponsored by five Burlington churches - a three-part oratorio, Considering Matthew Shepard,

By Staff

September 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

At a time when hate crimes are on the rise in Halton Region, five local churches are cooperating to host Considering Matthew Shepard – a performance based on the life and diaries of a young gay man who suffered and was killed in a hate crime.

This moving event will contribute to the ongoing awareness around issues and concerns facing LGBTQ+ youth. It will provide an opportunity for healing and reconciliation between and among marginalized groups and the wider community.

Port Nelson United Church

This event is being offered to the public free of charge by the combined sponsorship of five welcoming, affirming and inclusive local churches who believe in an open community of faith, that welcome everyone. Together, these congregations strive to make Halton a community that embraces diversity – differences of age, mental and physical health and ability, religious background, marital status, family structure, sexual orientation, gender and its expression, racial and cultural identity, educational and socioeconomic status, and more. All are always welcome at Port Nelson United Church, Burlington Baptist Church, St. Christopher’s Anglican, Grace United Church and St. Paul’s United Church!

About Considering Matthew Shepard
Craig Hella Johnson’s three-part oratorio, Considering Matthew Shepard, will be performed in Burlington by the renowned Elora Singers, one of the finest chamber choirs in Canada. It is a fusion of musical styles, of poetry and prose, drawing from the events, the rural Wyoming setting, and from Matthew’s own notebooks.

• DATE: Friday September 23rd, 2022
• PLACE: Port Nelson United Church, 3132 South Drive, Burlington, ON
• TIME: 7:30 p.m.
• COST: Free admission. If you are able, donations are accepted in advance or at the event in support of the Pflag Canada.
• DETAILS: https://consideringmatthewshepard.my.canva.site/

“…strung on a fence outside of town in Laramie, Wyoming,”

About Matthew Shepard
On a cold night, October 6, 1998, in a hateful homophobic act, 21-year-old gay university student Matthew Shepard was kidnapped, beaten, and strung on a fence outside of town in Laramie, Wyoming, a place he had lived and loved. He was found by a cyclist the next morning and died of his injuries several days later. The public outpouring of grief for the tragic end to Matthew’s life was scarred by the sickening protests of hate group, Westboro Baptist Church. Years later, Matthew’s name would be associated with changes to U.S. laws concerning hate crimes associated with homophobia.

Some 20 years after the event, Matthew’s life, death, and the questions of humanity they evoke inspired composer Craig Hella Johnson to compose a three-part oratorio, Considering Matthew Shepard. It is a fusion of musical styles, of poetry and prose, drawing from the events, the rural Wyoming setting, and from Matthew’s own notebooks.  It merges the personal with the universal, life with death, ugliness with beauty, and seeks hope from what was a tragedy without redemptive purpose.

 

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Round Up of Ontario Casino Apps

By Frederikke Reis

September 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Casimoose.ca has put together a list of the best casino apps available in Ontario so you can enjoy your favorite games on the go.

The overall user experience.is what matters most – if you’re not having fun – why bother

Are the online casino apps free to download?

There is a wide range of Ontario casino apps at casinoose.ca, and many of them are free to download. They offer a variety of games, with an extra feeling of Vegas live casinos, plus many bonuses and promo codes. However, it is important to check the terms and conditions of each app before you start using it, as some may require you to make a deposit before you can start playing.

How do the online casino apps work?

The online casino apps work by allowing you to play casino games on your mobile device. You can either download the app from the App Store and Google Play or play directly from the casino’s website. However, some of Ontario’s online casinos have not yet developed their apps. It’s worth remembering that apps consume a lot of space on your phone’s memory and can be loaded with commercials, so maybe playing games at online casinos on mobile browsers can be a good idea.

How do online casino apps compare to one another?

You can gamble on line with friends who are gambling on the same site at the same time. Try it with half a dozen people – great fun!

There are a few key factors to consider when comparing online casino apps. The first is the overall user experience. This includes things like how easy it is to navigate the app, how user-friendly the interface is, and whether or not there are any glitches or bugs. The second factor to consider is the selection of games offered. Some apps may have a more limited selection than others, so it’s important to find one that provides the types of games you’re interested in playing. Finally, you’ll want to consider the bonuses and promotions offered by each app. Some may offer better deals than others, so it’s worth taking a look at what each one has to offer before making your final decision.

What are the best casino apps in Ontario?

There are a few different casino apps that are popular in Ontario. The most popular ones include 888 Casino, Royal Panda, Leo Vegas, and Pokerstars. All of these apps offer a variety of games, including slots, table games, blackjack and more.

What are the features of the online casino apps?

There are a few key features to look for when choosing an online casino app.

First, you want to make sure that the app is compatible with your device. Most casino apps will work with iOS and Android devices, but a few are only compatible with one or the other.

Next, you want to ensure that the app offers a wide variety of games. While most casino apps will offer slots and table games, some will also offer sports betting, bingo, and more. The more game options an app has, the more likely you will find something you enjoy playing.

Secure encryption is vital. It is there to protect you.

Finally, you want to make sure that the app is safe and secure. When dealing with real money, you want to ensure that your information is safe. Look for an app that uses SSL encryption to protect your data.

What are the pros and cons of each online casino app?

There are a few things to consider when choosing an online casino app. The first is whether you want to play for real money or just for fun. If you’re playing for real money, you’ll need to make sure the app is licensed and regulated by a reputable gaming commission. You’ll also want to ensure the app offers a good selection of games and a user-friendly interface.

If you’re just playing for fun, there are still a few things to consider. You’ll want to ensure the app has a good selection of games and is easy to use. You may also want to look for an app that offers bonuses or other perks, such as VIP programs or loyalty rewards.

Casino apps are a great way to enjoy your favourite casino games on the go. Here is a round-up of some of the best casino apps available in Ontario.

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Rib Fest had a great first day - citizens talked about coyote problem - visitors loved the event

By Katelyn Goodwin

September 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

While covering the Rotary Rib Fest at Spencer Smith Park on Friday I talked to some of the people about the recent coyote attacks reported in south central Burlington.

Signs and whistles were the tools the city was using to combat the coyote problem.

While many folks come from outside the city simply to enjoy the Rib Fest, there are those residing within Burlington and on the outskirts who are aware of these attacks and were aware of what the city is doing to manage the problem.

Those from outside Burlington are aware of the attacks, though unaware of how the city is handling them.

For the most part residents believe the city is doing all they can and should educate people on the issue; some think the city cannot do a whole lot more than they already are – others claim they are providing minimal info and should be providing more.

Other people noted the distribution of whistles for the use of ‘hazing’ wild animals they may encounter, saying it was a decent solution for the time being.

Two women had many thoughts to share on the subject. One believed a reason for the sudden aggressive behaviour in coyotes stemmed from the issue of some people feeding wild animals, causing them to become more territorial. She also believed the elimination of the coyote suspected to have been the one that bit and scratched the leg of an eighteen-year-old girl south of Lakeshore Road as well as attack a two and a half-year-old toddler was ‘unfortunate, but necessary’.

While she stated she did not enjoy hearing about the elimination of any animal, she did not want any other residents or children injured by them, or any small pets attacked and killed.

It was the new normal everyone wanted. Few masks in sight.

The other woman said she felt sorry for the coyotes, believing us to have taken more of their habitat/territory away, though acknowledged what had to be done under city orders to take safety precautions. She was particularly concerned about the uncharacteristic aggression in the animals suddenly, calling it ‘worrying behaviour’.

As noted, there are differing thoughts from both Burlington residents and residents outside the city about these unprovoked coyote attacks and what the city is doing to manage the problem even during an enjoyable event such as the Rib Fest, with people coming to their own conclusions on what is being done/needs to be done to resolve the problem.

The interesting thing about asking people questions at a large public event is the answers you get. One woman from New York city was in town visiting and decided to take in the Rib Fest to see what it was like.

This is what brings them back to Burlington’s Rotary Rib Fest!

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My Pop - sings popular music in two- and three-part harmony.

By Staff

August 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Do you love to sing popular music,

like Elvis’ “Love Me Tender“ or “That’ll Be The Day”

Come “join” our choir!

No tryout required!!

These are the people you gotta talk to:

Alex Fiddles https://www.mypopchoir.com

Jane Cooper-Kelly 905-802-8487

My Pop Choir (MPC) sings popular music in two- and three-part harmony.

We are holding summer rehearsals by candlelight, in a beautiful garden setting, backing on to the Centennial Multi-use Path in the Lakeshore School Community.

MPC is a community-based choir, with one qualification for membership:

“You gotta love to sing” 🎶 No tryout required. 😊

When/Where:

Wednesday August 31. 2022

Final rehearsed songs to be sung at 8:30pm

Between Martha Street and Seneca Avenue

How:

Hop on your bike or take an evening stroll…

Look for the twinkling candlelight…

Listen for the magical voices of…

This sounds like a fun event – wish we had heard about it earlier so more of you could take part.

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McDonald to talk about the Halton County Courthouse and Jail - the place where Milton Town Councillors now meet

By Pepper Parr

August 31st, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Good speakers are always a delight to listen to – you learn a lot and you find the time was well spent.

The Burlington Historical Society will feature John McDonald at their September 12th meeting that will take place at 7:00 pm in the Centennial Hall at the Central Library

John McDonald – to talk about the former Halton County Jail – now the Milton Town Hall and what Prohibition was like in the Region.

McDonald was born in Milton, Ontario and is a lifelong resident of Halton. He graduated from Ryerson Polytechnic Institute and has served as a Member of Council with both Halton Hills and the Region of Halton.

John has conducted extensive research throughout the Halton area since the early 1970s including numerous presentations and walking tours. This work has resulted in the publication of three books: Halton Sketches, Halton Sketches Revisited and Halton’s Heritage. He is a founding member of the Esquesing Historical Society.

Once the Court House and Jail – now Town of Milton offices

John was awarded the Ontario Heritage Community Recognition Program “Certificate of Achievement” and recognized for his community efforts and historical research when presented with the “Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal”.

Join John for a fascinating look at the history of the Halton County Courthouse and Jail as well as the impact of the Temperance Movement and Prohibition in Burlington

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Pickleball seems to be THE issue in ward 3

By Pepper Parr

August 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Wards 2, 4 and 5 have serious issues with public safety and coyotes that are actually scratching people.

In ward 3 life is idyllic, the issue in that part of the city is pickleball, a sport that has become very popular, especially with the senior set.

Part of a electronic conversation ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan had with some of his citizens went like this:

I had a good chat with Bozana, an ardent advocate for pickleball in the community, today and here are a few of the outcomes as well as some clarity on items.

Action Items:
1. We will NOT create / enforce a pickleball ban at the Brant Hills Tennis Courts. The lines are being removed but people can still play there casually and the net that is there will be left there.

2. Casual pickleball is also possible at the basketball nets/parking lot in the middle of the park

3. We will establish a local group of interested pickleball players that the ward Councillor can work with on future changes and to advocate for more pickleball opportunities in Brant Hills and the area.

4. We will, with this new group, consider future capital expenditures in Brant Hills and the area to have more pickleball that is not too close to neighbours.

Additional info:
5. Consultation on this change of use was insufficient and the city (and councillor aka me) commit to do better in the future

6. There are valid concerns from local residents as reinforced by the consultant’s report, including the early start and late finish times of some users

7. Everyone has a right to the peaceful enjoyment of their backyard and while local residents never complained about tennis, pickleball noise is different

8. Other mitigation options are not feasible unfortunately

9. Pickleball players have good reason to not be happy about having to go to Ireland Park for a formal outdoor court

Ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan

10. Play time is available at the Brant Hills Community Centre

I hope this helps. I do want to recognize that communication and consultation could have been better.

If you’re interested in joining the local pickleball advocacy group please email ward3@burlington.ca.

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Veg Fest on Saturday at BurlOak Park

By Staff

August 19th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A VegFest featuring vegan products from local vendors, and welcoming any and all – from the vegan-curious to the experienced vegan.

Takes place on on August 20, 2022 at Burloak Waterfront Park from noon until 7pm

The free, family-friendly outdoor event will have something for everyone, including kids’ activities, demos, speakers, and a live band.

Visitors can experience delicious plant-based food and drinks, as well as health, beauty, and fashion products from a wide array of vegan businesses based in Burlington and surrounding communities.

The first 200 attendees will also receive a FREE swag bag filled with samples and coupons generously donated from our vendors and sponsors. Donations to buy plant-based food for the Burlington Food Bank will be accepted with a chance to win a prize for every $10 donation. A free shuttle will run throughout the day between Appleby GO station and Burlington VegFest.

The event will run from the official ribbon cutting and opening speech by Mayor Marianne Meed Ward at noon and will end at 7pm.

Plant-based lifestyles are on the rise across the West in response to health, environmental, and ethical concerns. Activists recognize the urgent state of these crises and Burlington VegFest hopes that this event will inspire and enable more people to take action to create a kinder, healthier, equitable planet for humans and animals.

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Mountainside Pool is going to get 'artsy' - artists invited to submit ideas.

By Staff

August 16th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Mountainside Pool is going to get a mural

The City is seeking Expressions of Interest from professional artists or artist teams to create a mural. The mural is for a large exterior wall as part of the Mountainside Pool Revitalization Project.

This is a two-stage competition.

In Stage One, artists will submit their qualifications and an Expression of Interest Statement.

In Stage Two, three artists will be short-listed to create a full design proposal. Shortlisted artists will be given an honorarium of $1,500 to create their design proposals.

Architect’s rendering of the pool that is now complete – mural to be installed.

A citizen advisory committee of local artists, residents and stakeholders explored project goals and themes. Artists are invited to respond to one or more aspects of the project goals determined by the Mountainside Pool Mural Steering Committee.

Who can apply?
This competition is open to professional artists or artist teams. Applicants must demonstrate the capacity to oversee the design, fabrication and installation of a large-scale mural in a public space. The selected artist/artist team must be available for meetings with project staff and the Steering Committee. We encourage submissions from artists from equity seeking groups, including 2SLGBTQ+, Indigenous, Black, and racialized artists, as well as deaf artists and artists with disabilities.

The Mountainside Pool Mural Project Goals:
• Create a contemporary, professional mural that is welcoming to families and pool users
• Reflect a spirit of inclusion, community building and belonging
• Demonstrate an understanding of or connection to the Mountainside community
• Celebrate the unique natural environment surrounding the facility; Mountainside is a neighbourhood in a natural setting (i.e. wood lot, connections to Niagara escarpment, etc.)
• Artists are encouraged to consider ways to incorporate community engagement into their project design (not mandatory)

The recreation Centre was given a total makeover – use of wood through made the entrance very welcoming. Very little cinder block anywhere.

Mountainside Pool Revitalization Project
Mountainside Pool revitalization project is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2023. Once the revitalization is complete, the facility will be a fun and welcoming multi-use outdoor swimming pool that invites the community to participate and experience swimming and water play while encouraging an active and healthy lifestyle.

Deadline Activity

Sept. 16 Expressions of Interest responses due

By Oct. 31 Three artists selected for shortlist (develop detailed design proposals)

Dec. 16 Detailed design proposals due

Jan 2023 Public consultation; interviews with shortlisted artists

Feb 2023 Winning proposal is selected; artist enters into a contract with the City of Burlington

May/June 2023 Mural is installed; public unveiling

Related news story:

Makeover of the Mountainside Recreation Centre

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Take part in the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation event at Spencer Smith Park on September 30th

By Staff

August 15th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON  

 

The City is inviting community groups and local indigenous communities to mark National Day for Truth and Reconciliation at Spencer Smith Park on September 30th  between 4 and 7 p.m.

An indigenous dancer – it will be interesting to see if performances like this will take place on the 30th

The city will provide free space within the park for groups to set up their own displays, interactive events, or information booths.

“This is an official open invitation to the community to set up an information booth, display or interactive event to help work towards a better understanding of the past as a way forward to a better future.” Says Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture.

Groups wanting to participate can register by contacting the Festivals and Events office HERE  . There is no cost for groups hosting an event or display and there is no cost for people to attend.

Details for participating groups

  1. Set-up time: 2 to 4 p.m.
  2. Event time: 4 to 7 p.m.
  3. Tear-down time: 7 to 8 p.m.
  4. City to provide park access and insurance only
  5. No electrical or water hook-up will be available
  6. Participating groups must bring all resources/supplies such as tables, chairs, tents, stage/riser,.
  7. Tents must be no bigger than 10 by 10 feet
  8. No staking anything to the ground. Tents should be secured with weights
  9. No parking. Participants are to use available downtown parking. Vehicle access to the park for drop-off must be pre-arranged indicating number of vehicles entering between 2-2:30 p.m. Vehicles must be removed from park no later than 3 p.m. Tear-down begins at 7 p.m. and vehicles may be brought back into the park at that time for load in

Details and updates can be found at burlington.ca/events.

 

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How to tour a town - Bronte Village tour taking place now

By Staff

August 15th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Historical Society got an invitation from a group in Oakville to take part in a tour of Bronte Village that is being held during the balance of August and early September.

For those who want to get a look at the way Oakville is promoting their communities to their citizens – you might want to take this in.

Your chance to get a close up and personal look at Burlington takes place on September 10th Doors Open Burlington will be held.

Virtual content will be available year-round.

The event showcases the infrastructure and cultural landscapes that shape and define the community. Doors Open is a province-wide program under the Ontario Heritage Trust.

Join us to catch a behind-the-scenes look at cultural and historical sites around Burlington. Explore the city and discover the stories of Burlington.

 

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First of four Jazz on the Patio sessions was a fine occasion

By Pepper Parr

August 13th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The weather was perfect – the setting was good.

The one hiccup with the sound system didn’t get in the way of a solid presentation from Amanda Martinez as she sang her way through an all Latin programme.

There was hardly a space to put a chair – this year there were tables set up on the sidewalk.

Tables were set up on the sidewalk creating more space for the several hundred that attended

There were people across the street sitting on benches and about 20 chairs were set up inside the Performing Arts Centre.

This was the 13th annual Jazz on the Patio programme that is put on and is free to everyone.

There are sponsors – this year it was the Burlington Downtown Business Association.

It was a good performance – soft, easy on the ears with just enough energy to appreciate the artists.

Martinez draws on her Mexican – South African roots …

Career highlights include headlining the Blue Note jazz club in NYC, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the Pan American Games in Mexico and Canada.

This afternoon she enchanted an audience that is getting used to not being in a rigid pandemic routine.

The band members were good – there was one especially nice session where the flugelhorn was put to very good use.

For many the afternoon was their first outing in a long time.

It was a quiet audience – on occasion there was a polite burst of applause.

Burlingtonians certainly show up for these events – but you never get the impression that the music has gotten into their bones.  No one danced in the space inside – and there was plenty of room.

A few people swayed to the music and one woman stood up and clapped and waved her arms in the air.

But that was about it.

This a decidedly seniors crowd – its always been that way for this event.

We left after the first of two performances.  Bumped into some friends, caught caught up on their lives and noticed that a lot of people were going to stick around for the second performance.  Given that seating is really limited – wondered is that fair.

This is a free public event – let’s let everyone get a seat at the table.

 

There are two performances on Sunday:

 

 

People stretched out – took in a nice lazy summer afternoon.

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