The Canadian team you can cheer for in the MLB

By Maria Garcia

June 24th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The MLB is the Major League Baseball, where the best baseball teams from North America compete to become this season’s best team.

As of 2022, a total of 30 teams play the league—15 teams in the National League and 15 in the American League —with 29 in the United States and 1 in Canada. The Canadian team that is participating is the Toronto Blue Jays, which is the one that most people here in the north are rooting for.

Betting on the MLB

To make any MBL match more exciting, you can try to bet on them. This is where you try to guess what will happen during the matches, for example, who will win. Before you can bet, you need to find a good betting site to do it on. This should be a site that offers to bet on the sports you like, and where you can find Mlb odds to wager on. You should also make sure that you are up to date on all the baseball rules, and on the different teams that are participating so that you can make educated guesses.

The Blue Jays
Most Canadians will probably want to bet on the Toronto Blue Jays. The team is a member club of the American League East division, and usually plays its home games at Rogers Center. However, the TD Ballpark in Dunedin, Florida has also been used for their matches. The name Blue Jays holds a special story and originates from the bird with the same name. It is also the traditional color of Toronto’s collegiate and professional sports teams in the country, of course including the famous Maple leaf. If you wish to bet on the Blue Jays, you should have a look at some Mlb lines to prepare.

Blue Jay fans have a history of waiting a long time to see their favorite baseball team play, but now they are finally able to see them play again. The Blue Jays are ranked as number 6 in the power rankings as of June 14. In other words, they are doing well, and as Canadians, we are thrilled to see the journey team represented in the MLB excell. It is also a great opportunity to bet on sports. Online sports betting is legal in Canada, so it might be time to find a good site to bet on.

 

Return to the Front page

Burlington Jays fans get delayed on GO train: violent altercation between passengers.

By Max Bowder

July 31st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Blue Jays fans were so excited to finally be able to watch their  team play at home after a 670 day delay.

Police officers investigating fight on the GO train heading for the Blue Jays ball game.

Their patience got extended Friday night due to a violent altercation between fellow passengers on the 17:48 train at Appleby Go station.

Witnesses say it began with yelling and light altercations before more people got involved which resulted in one man being taken off the train by paramedics with serious but none life threatening injuries.

As a result of the fight the train was cancelled and all had to wait for the 18:07 train to arrive which caused them to miss the beginning of the game.

Some of the boys waiting it out while the police investigation end. Their train was delayed and they missed the opening – but the Jays brought it home and kept everyone happy.

Despite the delay, the Blue Jay fans maintained their excitement and  watched as the Jays beat the Kansas City Royals 6-4.

One of the Jays home runs brought the crowd to their feet – something they had not been able to do for a long time.

Jays pitcher, Ross Stripling sat down for an interview with MLB news, saying “… I hope we do it big because that’s what we wanna do and I’m sure that’s what the fans want to do.”

Roger Stadium had been closed since 2020 due to the Covid-19 Pandemic and the Canada – United States Border being closed.

The Blue Jays were forced to relocate to Sahlen Field in Buffalo temporarily for the season before being given a National Interest Travel Exception by the Federal Government.

It took quite a bit of patience but getting the game was worthwhile – Jays to Kansas City Royal 6-4

When you are in the stands you want to be showing your colours.

Several fans were not concerned about Covid at this large event even with the Delta variant spreading. The dome of the Roger Centre was kept open during the game.

“We are double vaxed and relaxed,” said blue jays’ fan, Mike Hamilton.

Many lifelong Jays’ fans were among the passengers on the go train with one man I talked to telling me he has been buying tickets and watching every year since 1985.

Many fans did not have any expectations from any of the players on the Jay’s team but were all hoping that they would win.

Fans enjoyed watching The Blue Jays play in Buffalo during the extent of the Covid pandemic

Fans were also willing to point out that some areas of the Jays game needed to be improved, particularly with their pitchers, calling out Ross Stripling.

Other fans gave enthusiasm for other players such as Teoscar Hernández saying he is “underrated and doesn’t get enough press.”
Many fathers who had been avid Blue Jays fans since childhood brought their young sons out to the game with the intention of making them fans as well.

“I’m very excited!” said one fans son Mickey.

“I think he’s more excited about the food,” Mickey’s father quickly added.

Max Bowder is a second year journalism student at Sheridan College.  He is part of a team with the Gazette on the Local Journalism Initiative funded by the federal government.  Before enrolling at Sheridan Max volunteered in a community in Venezuela where he worked with young people.  He is a Burlington resident who helps out on the family farm in Milton.

Return to the Front page

Word from Blue Jays is that someone from Burlington could win half a million - think the team should focus on winning the game - they are up against the Yankees

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

April 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Blue Jau 50-50 Tomorrow night, one Blue Jays fan in Ontario will win a minimum half million dollars with Jays Care’s first virtual 50/50 jackpot of the 2021 Blue Jays season. Fans 18 years of age and older in Burlington can join Blue Jays fans in the fun and get their tickets for this massive online 50/50 at bluejays.com/5050.

All funds raised through the draw will support Ontario kids and families who have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This builds off a proud history of Jays Care’s community impact I Burlington with a local Challenger Baseball league running in the community.

Jays Care Foundation’s MLB-leading 50/50 draws are back! Celebrate the start of the Blue Jays season by getting your tickets for the season-opening draw, with a minimum guaranteed jackpot of $500.000.

Sales are open through 10 p.m. on April 14th following the Blue Jays home game against the New York Yankees. Join fans across Ontario in the excitement of virtual 50/50 and get your tickets HERE now.

All funds raised through the draw will support kids and communities as they safely emerge from the pandemic. Support Jays Care and get your tickets now!

Must be 18+ and located in Ontario to purchase.

Return to the Front page

The evolution of baseball's unwritten rules; the game is changing.

sportsgold 100x100By John Cole

October 29th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

With MLB players expressing themselves like never before, author Jason Turbow explains how baseball can maintain its code of respect and fair play.

It’s Game 1 of the 2019 National League Divisional Series.

Acuman Braves basebakk home run

Ronald Acuña Jr: He stands and watches as it sails towards the wall, and remains in the batter’s box as it drops into the 10th row of seats. He lets out a roar and begins his slow, celebratory trot around the bases.

Ronald Acuña Jr. – playing in just the fifth playoff game of his career – launches a fly ball into left field. He stands and watches as it sails towards the wall, and remains in the batter’s box as it drops into the 10th row of seats.

He lets out a roar and begins his slow, celebratory trot around the bases.

Normal behaviour after hitting a home run, you might think, but baseball’s code has been broken.

Four games later, against the same opposition, Acuña Jr. steps up to the plate again. The Atlanta Braves need a hero. They trail 13-1 in Game 5, with their chances of reaching the next round all but extinguished.

Acuña will not, however, get a chance to be that hero. The pitch drills him on the arm. Revenge has been served.

Don’t celebrate a home run. Don’t bunt to break up a no-hitter. Don’t steal a base with a big lead late in the game. Don’t walk across the pitcher’s mound. These are just a few of baseball’s many unwritten rules.

If you break them, then expect consequences. More often than not, those consequences come in the form of a well-directed pitch, as Acuña Jr. now knows.

Such retaliation has been commonplace in the MLB for decades as players take it upon themselves to enforce their code, even when it’s their own teammate who is in the wrong.

mlb-graphic 1Jason Turbow, author of The Baseball Codes, recalls a story from 1996 involving Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Roger Cedeño.  The Venezuelan stole a base against the San Francisco Giants with an 11-2 lead late in the game, infuriating the opposition.

His team-mate, Eric Karros, headed over to the Giants’ dugout and told them: “We’ll handle this.”  When reporters were allowed into the Dodgers’ clubhouse after the victory, following the team debrief, Cedeño was wiping tears from his eyes.

Things are, however, starting to change.
Bat flips are becoming a common sight. Players are beginning to express themselves in ways the sport has never seen.

“The beautiful thing about the unwritten rules, for me, is that they are ever-evolving,” Turbow explains.

“The code that ball players abide by today is very different to how it was, even 10 years ago, which was in turn very different to a generation before that.

“People just aren’t as offended now as they used to be about these things.

“For example, it used to be you couldn’t dig in to the batter’s box – you co uldn’t shove your toe down into the dirt to get a good foothold – at the risk of offending pitchers back in the sixties and seventies. No one even notices that now.”

The move away from strict adherence to the code has been gradual, taking place over many years, and can primarily be explained by a change of mentality among modern baseball players.

Before free agency rules changed in the 1970s, movement between MLB teams was restricted, meaning many played for a single franchise for the bulk or entirety of their career.

This, Turbow explains, is why the unwritten rules were so strictly enforced.

“Up until the free agency era you were on a team, more or less, for life,” he says.
“Some players got traded, some players got released, but the only way you left a team was if they didn’t want you anymore. And thus, you built bonds with your teammates. You built antagonism with your opponents.

“In the modern era, players sometimes jump from team to team every couple of years. They go on vacations in the off-season with each other, they share agents, they do charity golf tournaments together.

“Every team is filled with players who have friends on every other team. The antagonism just isn’t there anymore.

“Whereas once you were offended by something a stranger, or an opponent who you already had antipathy toward, would do, now your opponent, who you like, is doing that same thing, you’re not even going to think about it.”

The increasing number of international MLB players – such as Acuña Jr. and Cedeño – has also contributed to this shift.

More than 25 per cent of players in the league now come from outside the USA, hailing from 20 different countries, all with their own way of playing the game.

“When it comes to integrating foreign players, there is going to be a transition process,” Turbow says.

“The brand of baseball they play in Latin America, for example, is very different.

“Celebrations are embraced down there. They are expected. This is the kind of baseball that those guys grew up learning, and now they’re bringing it to the United States.

“The Asian players, particularly the Japanese players, tend to play by even stricter rules than the Americans.
“Korean players flip the heck out of their bats. It’s all about getting used to each other.”

mlb-seo-headerRecently, however, the MLB has taken matters into its own hands. Advertising campaigns titled ‘Let The Kids Play’ and ‘We Play Loud,’ released ahead of the post-season in 2018 and 2019, explicitly condone behaviour that would previously have been condemned. Bat flips, showboating, celebrations. Anything goes.

“This officially codified the idea that these kids can show emotion on the field – they can flip their bats, they can celebrate themselves in ways that fans find appealing,” explains Turbow.

“It is baseball’s way of trying to grow the fanbase, especially among a younger demographic.”

Baseball traditionalists are, however, not making it easy for MLB. They continue to cling onto the code, passing it down to younger generations.

Right now when a pitcher throws at a batter who has only just stepped in and not yet begun his 15 step routine (touch helmet, grind foot, cock elbow five times etc) it’s called a “quick pitch.  That’s called unsportsmanlike like.

The game was designed by the best teams to move slowly.  Anything done to change that pace unsettles everything. For a game that throws so much money into tactical analysis, baseball is terrible at tactical innovation

As a result, the sport is currently going through a transition period where the old and the new coexist uneasily, particularly with regards to celebrating.

“In previous generations, bat flipping was a no-no. Pitchers would get viscerally offended, sometimes to the point of throwing a baseball at an opponent in retaliation.

“We’re now in this weird grey area in that there are still some pitchers who feel that way. Never mind that baseball has officially decreed it appropriate to flip a bat, there are still some pitchers who get annoyed at it.

“That creates some cognitive dissonance when it comes to how players behave on the field. They’re still trying to work it out.”

How, then, does baseball move forward? Can these unwritten rules, formed over a century or more, coexist with modern, fast-paced baseball?

“I think so,” asserts Turbow.

“These unwritten rules are fluid – they evolve. The idea of showing respect on the field is compatible with players having outside personalities, Twitter accounts and whatnot.

In the meantime it is a great game to wager on.

“It’s only when it comes to celebration that the hardliners and the traditionalists have a problem, and the traditionalists are dying off on a daily basis.”

So perhaps, in five years’ time, Acuña Jr. will be able to stand, admire and celebrate without fear of retribution being hurled at his ribs at 90 miles per hour.

John Cole has been watching baseball for more than four decades.  His Dad took him to his first game.  He likes the pace of the game and all those unwritten rules – but knows that changes are in the making.

 

Return to the Front page

Kitchener Panthers take the lead in the IBL finals - winner will take the new trophy home.

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 29th, 2018

BURLINGTON, ON

 

When the Barrie Baycats or Kitchener Panthers hoist the IBL championship trophy next week, it will be a first. Both teams have certainly done so before – but not this one.

IBL trophy

Jack and Lynne Dominico Trophy

In celebration of the IBL’s 100th season, the League commissioned a new trophy. It will still be called the Jack and Lynne Dominico Trophy but the old wooden trophy, which had been awarded for 25 years since 1993, is going out of service. In its place the IBL has a new and more traditional trophy – a cup, mounted on a series of levels that chronicle all 99 league champions.

“We have done a number of things to recognize our 100th season,” said Commissioner John Kastner. “We recognized the top 100 players in League history, we had special baseballs from Rawlings complete with our 100th season logo, and we produced a fantastic book.”

“All of those things were great initiatives but the trophy is the one thing that will create a lasting legacy for this, our 100th season.”

And what a season it is turning out to be. The Burlington Herd didn’t make it out of the quarter finals but the league leading Barrie Baycats and the Kitchener Panthers are matched up in the playoffs.

The first game in a best out of seven went 11 innings with the Panthers taking the game 1-0

IBL innings graphicThe next game is in Kitchener on Thursday.

Created by Wilson Trophy of Mississauga, it is nickel, with a black base and with the IBL logo proudly displayed.

About the Intercounty Baseball League (IBL) The Intercounty Baseball League (IBL) is the top level baseball league in Ontario, boasting ex-major league professional and elite NCAA college baseball players. The 2018 season will mark the IBL’s 100th season. The IBL is the fifth longest continually operated baseball league in the world and serves as a valuable training ground for coaches, umpires and front office staff. More than 40 IBL players have advanced to Major League Baseball or returned to the IBL following their MLB careers. The league is comprised of teams from Barrie, Brantford, Kitchener, London, Toronto, Guelph, Burlington and Hamilton. For more information, visit www.theibl.ca.

Return to the Front page

Herd still looking for the game that gets them out of the gate and onto the score card.

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

May 28th, 2018

BURLINGTON, ON

 

May 27thThe Burlington Herd continue to struggle out of the gate as they fell 12-3 to the Kitchener Panthers Sunday afternoon in Kitchener.

Matt McCue was Burlington’s best player at the plate with three hits including a home run. Justin Gideon also had a decent day with three hits including a double.

The Panthers blew the game open with six runs in the bottom of the eighth. The Herd are now 0-6 while the Panthers improved to 5-2.

Noelvis Entenza picked up the win for the Panthers pitching into the seventh inning and scattering six hits.

The Panthers used five pitchers en route to the victory while Rich Corrente went seven innings en route to the loss.

Keegan Marsden led the offence with a double, two home runs and four RBI for the Panthers. Brian Burton also homered.

Elsewhere in the league the London Majors gave the IBL champions a taste of defeat.

The Barrie Baycats entered Sunday’s game in London on a 13-game win streak, including a 4-0 start to this season.

The London Majors ended the streak in convincing fashion, thumping the Baycats 10-4 and were ahead 10-1 entering the ninth. The Baycats fell to 4-1 and the Majors are now 4-3.

The Majors rode a seven-run second inning to victory, sending 11 men to the plate. Edward Salcedo had a home run for London while Cleveland Brownlee, Mike Ambrose and Chris McQueen had doubles.

Ryan Rijo had two hits for Barrie, including a home run.

Dylan Brooks tossed seven innings for the win, giving up just three hits and a walk. Matthew St. Kitts took the loss, failing to get out of the second inning.

In Toronto, the Hamilton Cardinals overcame a 3-0 deficit with six runs in the fifth, two in the sixth and one in the seventh en route to a 10-8 win over the Maple Leafs at Christie Pits.

The Maple Leafs made a game of it scoring four runs in the bottom of the ninth.

Designated hitter Jake Chiaravalle had a day for the Cardinals banging out four hits, including a home run, and drove in three runs. Connor Bowie also had three hits for the Cardinals and also drove in three runs.
Justin Marra had two hits for the Leafs including his fifth home run. Johnathan Solazzo had two hits, including a double.

Josh Freeman recorded the win on the hill for Hamilton and Zach Sloan took the loss.
The Cardinals are 2-2 and the Maple Leafs are 5-2.

Mattingly Romanin

Mattingly Romanin, 25, joins the Herd after being selected by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 39th round of the 2015 MLB Draft. Splitting the 2017 season with the Blue Jays’ Single-A affiliate clubs the Vancouver Canadians of the Northwest League and the Lansing Lugnuts of the Midwest League, Romanin collected 36 hits, 13 doubles, 17 RBI, and two stolen bases over 57 games played, winning the Northwest League Championship with Vancouver. The hometown product graduated from Notre Dame High School in Burlington and spent time with the Ontario Terriers before committing to Chicago State University. In his time at the NCAA Division-1 school from 2012-15, Romanin became the team’s all-time leader in hits (224), RBI (118), and doubles (41), while also earning 2013 All-GWC (Great West Conference) First Team and 2014 All-WAC (Western Athletic Conference) Second Team All-Star honours. Slated to primarily play shortstop for the Herd, the 5-foot-10, right-handed infielder returns to the IBL after spending brief stints in Burlington during the 2012 season and with the Guelph Royals during the 2015 campaign. In his previous appearances in the league, Romanin had a .304 AVG while registering 17 hits, three doubles, six RBI, and 14 runs scored over 15 total games played.

The Guelph Royals did what the Burlington Herd have yet to do – win a baseball game so far this season. Single runs in the seventh, eighth and ninth innings led the Guelph Royals to their first win of the season, a 3-2 win over the Red Sox in Brantford.

It was a back-and-forth battle as Guelph led 2-0 then gave up two runs in the bottom of the eighth.

In the ninth, Brendan Keys led off with a single and went to second after Toure Sinclair was hit by a pitch. Josh Garton walked on four pitches to load the bases and then Sean Reilly hit into a fielders’ choice that scored the winning run.

Reilly had three hits for the Royals and Sinclair had two.

Catcher Ricky Murray had a career day for the Red Sox with four hits and Blake Kauer had a double.

Stefan Strecker suffered the loss in relief for the Red Sox, who are now 0-3. Yunior Yambatis got the win.

Return to the Front page

Hamilton Cardinals, their IBL baseball team, have decided to use the ownership model used by the best team in the league.

sportsred 100x100By Staff

January 21st, 2018

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is life for the Hamilton team in the Intercounty Baseball League (IBL) who announced the team will be on the field this spring under new – joint – ownership.

IBL logo - all teamsThe joint ownership program, modeled after the Barrie Baycats, which has a 20-person ownership group, will breathe new life into the Hamilton team, ensuring the team has the funding and support needed to once again become a competitive baseball club, and make team ownership an exciting and affordable reality for local baseball fans.

KyleDeGrace with IBL trophy 2017

The Barrie Baycats took the IBL trophy in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

John Kastner, the Intercounty Baseball League commissioner said “Hamilton has a long history of baseball, but in recent years, maintaining that history and commitment has been in jeopardy. Under this new model, we believe the team is now in a position to be able to continue that history with a solution that will see this team supported in a new and sustainable way.”

Carmen’s Group and the City of Hamilton have both committed to helping facilitate the joint ownership program, and that work is underway. “We are thrilled to help rebuild one of Hamilton’s oldest flagship sports teams,” said PJ Mercanti, CEO, Carmen’s Group. “This is a fantastic opportunity for community funders and baseball fans alike to come together, support the team and experience great baseball, at an affordable price, close to home. There is tremendous potential for community engagement that we have here before us and we anticipate a great deal of interest.”

The City of Hamilton will use existing capital budget dollars to ensure Bernie Arbour Memorial Stadium is ready to go for the Cardinals’ 2018 season, and together the IBL, Dean DiCenzo the team’s General Manager, Carmen’s Group and the City are working on a plan to recruit the new owners. As a starting point and in keeping with the proven Barrie model, the group is aiming for 20-25 joint owners at $5,000 apiece. A management board of five or six members will be elected by the ownership group.

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger previously met with team representatives and strongly supports rallying behind the team. “The Hamilton Cardinals have a long, 60-year history in this city and I could not be more pleased that they’re getting a chance to resurrect themselves through this new ownership model,” he said. “This team is passionate and resilient, and I look forward to seeing our community come together to support them this coming season, and for many seasons to come.”

To inquire about becoming a joint owner of the Hamilton Cardinals, please contact PJ Mercanti at pjmercanti@carmensgroup.com.

The Intercounty Baseball League (IBL) is the top level baseball league in Ontario, boasting ex-major league professional and elite NCAA college baseball players. The 2018 season will mark the IBL’s 100th season. The IBL is the fifth longest continually operated baseball league in the world and serves as a valuable training ground for coaches, umpires and front office staff. More than 40 IBL players have advanced to Major League Baseball or returned to the IBL following the their MLB careers. The league is comprised of teams from Barrie, Brantford, Kitchener, London, Toronto, Guelph, Burlington and Hamilton.

Hamilton basebal player

Hamilton Cardinal right-fielder Connor Bowie stretches to snag a fly ball during a 9-4 loss to the Burlington Herd.

Founded in 1958, and part of the Intercounty Baseball League (IBL), the Hamilton Cardinals are celebrating their 60th anniversary this year. They are the second oldest sports team in Hamilton and last won the IBL Championship in 1978. Players range in age from 19-35. Many are former major leaguers and minor pro players as well as current and former NCAA/U sports players. Home games are played at Bernie Arbour Memorial Stadium in Hamilton, Ontario. For more information, visit www.hamiltoncardinals.ca.

Carmen’s Group is a leading hospitality and entertainment brand in Hamilton, Ontario. Established in 1978, they have created and operate some of the Hamilton region’s most beloved establishments: Carmen’s, the Best Western Premier C Hotel, Baci Ristorante, the Hamilton Convention Centre, The Lakeview, and Dundas Valley Golf & Curling Club.

Return to the Front page

Four Burlington athletes competing in the Pan Am games; two woman are strong in baseball

News 100 blueBy Staff

July 11, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Burlington somehow managed miss out on the Pan American games.

The opportunity to have a facility in the east end of the city was lost – mostly due to a very strong reaction from the people who didn’t want anything done to Sherwood Forest Park

Now the biggest park the city has - and the furthest from the bulk of the population.

Now the biggest park the city has – and the furthest from the bulk of the population.

Burlington did get an excellent soccer pitch and a much improved park on the west side of the city.
City View Park is a superb site – with lot of room to walk and roam and 3  soccer pitches that the people of Burlington won’t get to use until the games are over.

The grounds are being used as a practice location for Pan Am soccer players. The city did collect a significant fee for the use of the grounds.
The soccer fields are covered with Astro turf which are seen as expensive to maintain.

In a media release the city sent out the names of eight Burlington affiliated competing in the Games: which is a cheaters way of saying there are eight Burlington or close by  athletes playing in the games. Why would the city add in the names of great athlete from Oakville, Mississauga and Hamilton ?

Mike Green, Racketball; is a Hamilton resisdent.
Melanie Hawtin, Wheelchair Basketball is an Oakville resident
Mark Oldershaw, Canoe, is a resident of Oakville
Ashley Stephenson, Baseball; is a Mississauga resident.

Hawtin and Oldershaw are well known to Burlington audiences; Hawtin in particular is one heck of a wheel chair basketball player.

The genuine Burlingtonians are

Brady Reardon, kayak
Autumn Mills, baseball
Tyler Muscat; the martial art of Taekwondo
Kate Psota, baseball

Autumn Mills,
Autumn MillsSince being selected to the Canadian Women’s National Team at age 16, Autumn Mills has competed in five editions of the IBAF World Cup and won three medals, including a best-ever silver in 2008. Her personal highlight has been playing on home soil in Edmonton at the 2012 World Cup where she got the save in closing out the bronze medal victory over Australia. Mills had played boys baseball throughout her childhood because she had no knowledge of any opportunity for girls in the game.

When she was 15 she was asked to try out for Team Ontario. That summer, she and her father commuted to Toronto from London every weekend for games. It was then that she finally heard about Team Canada and the chance to compete around the world, something she convinced herself she would be part of one day.

PERSONAL:   Family: Parents Daniel and Nancy Mills… Getting into the Sport: Started playing t-ball at age 4… She was on par or better than the boys and had a strong arm so stuck with it… Outside Interests: Earned her Bachelor of Arts in kinesiology and Bachelor of Education (primary/junior) at York University… Enjoys doing Crossfit, snowboarding, and going to Blue Jays’ games… Works as a police officer… Odds and Ends: Favourite motto: “Luck is the residue of hard work”… Admires smaller guys in MLB such as Dustin Pedroia who make big plays and hit the ball with power despite their size… Superstition: The ball must be on the ground before pitching; if someone throws it she puts it down, walks around the mound and takes a deep breath before picking it up… Has a good luck Pandora bracelet with baseball charms on her left wrist… Always travels with a lacrosse ball… Collects different Starbucks city mugs… Nickname: Millsy

Tyler Muscat
MuscatThe martial art of Taekwondo is fascinating to watch – two people in the rink, each lightly bouncing in anticipation of the other person’s hit while trying to calculate their own strike. The energy that flows between the two competitors when they dance around each other, throwing jabs and kicks when they see the opportunity, is tense and powerful.

“My first Nationals was when I was 12 years old. I ended up getting first place.”

Tyler Muscat is a confident 19-year-old Taekwondo athlete who knows the sport well; he’s practiced it for the past 13 years of his life and he doesn’t see a near end. At the age of 10 he got into the competitive part of Taekwondo and has been going to competitions and traveling the world since. “My first Nationals was when I was 12 years old. I ended up getting first place, and from then on it just got better,” says Muscat, who lives just outside Toronto in Burlington, Ont.

He is heading to Russia’s 2015 World Taekwondo Championships later this week with promising ambitions of making it to the 2016 Olympic Games – he’s currently ranked 10th in the world for his weight division.

His speciality is his speed. Muscat says that in his division, 54kg – the lowest in the senior category, many of his opponents are tall and do this move called the cut-kick. What saves him is his speed and technique, they give him an advantage that makes it easy to get around the move.

Muscat isn’t too worried about the Russian Games right now, he sees them as more of an opportunity to grab points and advance his world rank. His confidence stems from two practices a day, each an hour and a half, and from his trainer Carla Bacco. He met Carla in the beginning of his Taekwondo career at his school Kicks for Kids, and has practiced there under her guidance since.

Kicks for Kids has become his current University/College since he decided to postpone his post-secondary degree indefinitely after high school. “There’s a perfect time for everything,” says Muscat, “I’m trying to focus on the main things right now. School is always there for you.”

When he decides to return he wants to pursue a career in marketing (experience with interviews and advertising himself as an athlete is his first taste in the line of work) and complete his post-secondary education. “I don’t think I will ever stop Taekwondo, even if I was in school,” says Muscat.

A constant quirk of his that has followed him through every country and competition is his familial support; while he appreciates his family’s help and encouragement he doesn’t allow them to go to his competitions. “I get nervous,” he says, “even Nationals in Toronto, I didn’t let my family come out to support me just because I’m particular like that.”

But whether he goes alone or not, Muscat’s confidence is unwavering and his world rank can prove it – coming back home to his family to celebrate the wins makes them that much sweeter.

Kate Psota
Kate psotaKate Psota is a veteran of the women’s national team, having appeared in every IBAF World Cup since its inception in 2004. She has won four medals in six tournaments, highlighted by a silver medal in 2008. Psota was named national team MVP in 2009 and 2010. In 2010 and 2012 she was a World Cup all-star at first base. Psota played collegiate hockey for the Laurier Golden Hawks, winning five consecutive OUA championships from 2006 to 2010. In 2009 she was a CIS Academic All-Canadian.

PERSONAL:  Family: Parents Ed and Monique Psota… Younger brother Mike… Getting into the Sport: Started playing t-ball at age 4/5… Nobody in her family was involved in the sport, but when she was young she was obsessed with watching the Toronto Blue Jays and wanted to play baseball just like them… Outside Interests: Graduated from Wilfred Laurier University in 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in geography and kinesiology… Earned her Bachelor of Arts in education from Queens’ University in 2011… Enjoys going to the family cottage, boating, fishing, swimming, and gardening… Works at a garden centre… Odds and Ends: Worked and trained in Australia during the 2012 season where she developed friendships with their national team members… Nickname: Sodey… Tries to bring home something reflective of the culture wherever she travel.

Brady Reardon

BReardonrady Reardon is a second generation Olympian who was proud to have his father Jim on-site to watch him at Beijing 2008. Just like his dad at Munich 1972, Reardon competed in the K-4 1000m. Reardon has competed at every edition of the ICF World Championships since his debut in the K-2 1000m in 2007.

In 2012 he began racing K-1 internationally and won a silver medal in the first K-1 500m race of the World Cup season. A longtime training partner of Burloak clubmate Adam van Koeverden, the two focused on the K-2 1000m in 2013 and won a silver medal at the third World Cup stop in Poznan. In 2014 Reardon teamed with Andrew Jessop in the K-2 1000m at the world championships and recorded one of Canada’s best results of the competition with their seventh place finish.

PERSONAL:  Family: Parents Jim and Danny Reardon… Older brother Tucker… Getting married in September 2015… Getting into the Sport: Grew up in the sport because both of his parents paddled… Outside Interests: Enjoys mountain biking, DIY projects, being outside with his dog Banditt… Has a degree in kinesiology from McMaster University.  Volunteers with KidSport.  Odds and Ends: Always drinks a Guinness before race day.  Always keeps his racing numbers.

Favourite motto: “When you think you’re going as hard as you can, toughen up and go harder”…

 

Return to the Front page

Province's lottery and gambling arm are hoping to secure up to $375 million in additional profits in the next five years

News 100 blueBy Edmund Anderson

March 6, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

For many sports and gambling enthusiasts, new games and new ways to win big are now being offered . In Ontario, betting and gambling are overseen by OLG and PlayOLG is the brand new official site where residents of this province can do all their online gambling including sports betting. It is secure and legal and perfect for those that want to gamble from the comfort of their own home.

OLG offers a number of online gambling options and they are set to add more in the future including peer-to-peer poker, bingo, sports betting and more. This brand new site opened its doors in early January 2015 and it provides the government with another opportunity to expand their revenue from gambling.

Play OLGBy launching this brand new online gambling website, the OLG is hoping to tap into the estimated $400 million that Ontario gamblers are spending annually on international sites. They are hoping to secure up to $375 million in additional profits in the next five years. Ontario now joins British Columbia, Manitoba, Quebec and all of the Atlantic Provinces in offering online gambling and casino style games to their residents. Players at PlayOLG will be able to set their own wagering limits up to $9,999 per week. They must be at least 18 years of age and must be an Ontario resident and play within the province.

Sports Betting in Ontario
The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation is operated by the provincial government of Ontario and they offer the only legal Canadian based online sports gambling for residents of Ontario. Ontario is home to no less than four major league sports teams and Toronto is rumored to eventually be the host for Canada’s first ever NFL football team. The major sports teams are the Maple Leafs in the NHL, the Blue Jays in the MLB, The Raptors in the NBA, and the Toronto FC in the MLS. With this in mind, it is easy to see why sports betting is very popular in Ontario. The OLG has recently made Pro-Line betting services available online which is great news for sports betting fans who like to place their wagers online.

OLG’s Pro-Line online sports betting website is available to all Ontario residents over the age of 18 and here you will find all the days listed events, links to the sports offered and the lines for these events. The Pro-Line betting grid lists available betting options and you will need to make your selections and then print out your betting slip. The betting options available are very limited especially when you compare these to international online sports betting websites. The Pro-Line bets are comprised of picking 3-6 outcomes and that is it. They also offer Point Spread and Pro Picks but it still doesn’t compare to the international sites.

Canada’s Legal Sports betting Bill – C290
With current Canadian gambling laws, parlays are the only way that Canadian residents can place a wager. If you are a serious gambling this means you will be limited and it is why many sports betting fans choose to use international sites.

Here they can place whatever bets they want. The parlay rule has been subject to a lot of debate over recent years and many Canadians are hoping that the C290 bill will get passed. It has been tied up in the senate for a long time now and once passed this will remove the parlay wager rule and allow Canadians to bet on single game results and so much more. For sporting fans this will be a very welcome change as it will allow them to bet on single results such as the NFL final, football, and so much more.

So far we still don’t know when this bill will be passed or even if it will be passed and because of this, Canadians are doing their sports betting elsewhere and opting to use international websites that allow bets from Canadian gamblers. The downside to this, is that the government is losing out on massive revenues each year and this is the argument for the passing of the C290 bill as once passed, these revenues can be kept in Canada and pumped back into Ontario’s economy.

Legal betting and online gambling in Ontario is done through OLG and their provincially run website PlayOLG is for residents of this province only. There are advantages to this in that you know that everything you do is legal and the site is safe. The disadvantages of course are that you are only playing against residents of Ontario and the jackpots up for grabs aren’t as big as those offered by huge international websites. If you are planning on placing wagers on sporting events this year, including the NFL’s Superbowl final or this year’s Stanley Cup final, then like many others, you will be hoping the C290 bill issue is resolved sooner rather than later.

You can read about the NFL final predictions and what sites are offering the best odds so that you know where to place your wagers for the best return. There is also valuable information for those who will be placing parlay bets too.

Return to the Front page