Prowler in the Palmer Drive community in Burlington is also peeping – into your home.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  December 23, 2011  – Halton Regional Police have received reports of a prowler who is doing more than prowling along Palmer Drive near Guelph Line. The prowler’s actions suggest he was peeping into the homes.

The man is described as being in his forties 6’1, 220 lbs., wearing blue jeans, a grey sweater and grey hat.

There have been several similar incidents reported to the Halton Regional Police Service both in Burlington and Oakville dating back to early 2011. In these earlier incidents, the reports were of a suspect masturbating while looking into homes. Police believe that the same person is responsible for many of these acts.  There is no evidence that the culprit ever attempted to enter any of the residences.

The Halton Regional Police Service would like to remind residents to be vigilant in reporting any suspicious behaviour around their homes to police.   Additionally, police would like to hear from those residents who have experienced similar incidents that have previously gone unreported.  Further, police are asking that if residents encounter incidents of this nature, they DO NOT confront the culprit but immediately call 911.

Anyone with information in relation to these or any other crimes is asked to contact the Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905 825-4747 x2215 or anonymously through Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

 

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Halton police chief decides to ride off into the sunset – announces his retirement to start in June, 2012

By Pepper Parr

BURLINGTON, ON  December 15, 2011  – Gary Crowell, the Chief of Halton Regional Police is hanging up his pistols and will take retirement in June of 2012.  After 41 years of policing, which started with a stint with the RCMP, the chief, who has been with the Halton Regional Police Service since 1999, when he was brought in as Deputy Chief, is bringing a police career to an end.

Crowell was promoted to Chief in 2006.   Prior to coming to Halton, he served with the Peel Regional Police Service.

Police Services Board Chairman Bob Maich and other members of the Board commended and thanked Chief Crowell for his dedication to the Service, and to the community. “The Board is proud of the Chief’s many accomplishments attained over the years. Through the leadership, integrity and decisiveness of Chief Crowell, the Police Service team, the Region of Halton, and all community members have benefited from his contributions”, said Bob Maich. “The Board looks forward to his continued leadership through this transition period.”

Chief Gary Crowell has announced his retirement for June of 2012. Police Services Board gears up to find a replacement.

Chief Crowell thanked the Board for their incredible support and guidance during his six years as Chief. He also thanked the members of the Service for their dedication and commitment in making the Halton Police Service a very effective and professional organization. “With the excellence of the Service team and many volunteers, our community partners and Halton citizens, I am proud that Halton has been able to maintain its recognition as the safest Regional Municipality in Canada”, remarked Crowell. “I will continue my commitment to the Service through to June, 2012.”

Throughout his career, Crowell has been committed to the betterment of the Service and the community. He is a member of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Crime Prevention Committee, the National Child and Youth Protection Advisory Committee and the Halton Poverty Roundtable. He served on the Joseph Brant Hospital Board of Governors for nine years. He is also the recipient of the Police Exemplary Service Medal, the Order of Merit, the Gold Medal for Excellence by the Human Rights and Race Relations Centre, and the Ontario Women in Law Enforcement’s first President’s Award.

Officer Wendy Moraghan is one of the group of women in the Halton Regional Police Service that Chief Crowell wanted to see in the service as it expanded. Here she works on some equipment with a techie as they prepare for a community presentation.

Crowell was responsible for some significant changes in the number of female police in the Halton service.

The Board will meet early in the New Year to consider the process it will undertake to appoint a new Chief.  The Halton Regional Police Services Board is a seven-member civilian Board that governs the Halton Regional Police. Under the Police Services Act, the Board is responsible for the provision of adequate and effective police services to the citizens of Halton Region. The Halton Regional Police Service has an authorized strength of 925 staff, a net budget of $122.2 million.

The Police Services Board is going through a budget for 2012 that looks as if it will require a tax increase of 3.2%

Among the people that will certainly be in line for the top job is Deputy Chief Bob Percy who is currently as Deputy Chief Operations responsible for all front line and investigative policing. Halton Regional Police Service Operations under his command include:  District Policing, Emergency Services, Intelligence Bureau and Regional Investigative Services.  This task set is the guts of policing – the reason we have men and women in police cars with guns on their hips.

Prior to his promotion to Deputy Chief in May 2008, Deputy Chief Percy served in a wide variety of uniform patrol duties, including as a Coach Officer, Tactical Rescue Unit officer, patrol supervisor, and District Superintendent.

Deputy Chief Bob Percy has handled some tricky situations in Burlington while he did his best to bring competitive cycling to the Region. He currently runs the Operations side of the Regional Police Service.

Percy worked closely with the city of Burlington while they tried to work out a series of problems related to the potential for competitive level cycling that would be part of the selection of members of the Canadian Olympic Team.  The problems proved to be insurmountable in large measure to the cost of police services to handle traffic control.

A couple of months later Chief Crowell appeared before Burlington city council to tell them that Burlington was doing OK from a policing point of view.  The city had not seen the chief for some time.  During that visit Superintendent Joe Taylor took part in the reporting event.  That was another first for some time.  Supt. Taylor proved to be a man with a sense of responsibility laced with a bit of a sense of humour.  That wasn’t a personality trait evident in most senior police officers.

Police Services tend to look within when there are changes in the top levels.  They tend to look for people who are thoroughly familiar with the community and know everyone in the chain of command.

Another candidate that will get a very close look for promotion is Deputy Chief Andrew Fletcher who began his policing career with the Halton Regional Police Service as a Cadet in 1984. He oversees Community Policing Administration as the Deputy Chief responsible for Community Policing Support, Human Resources, Training, Communications Bureau, Information Services, Courts Services, Records, and Administrative Support Services.

Deputy Chief Fletcher currently runs the Administrative side of the Halton Regional Police Service.

Deputy Chief Fletcher is a strong advocate for community policing and public safety. He is dedicated to building relationships with the community through a number of proactive policing and crime prevention initiatives.

Deputy Chief Fletcher also represents the HRPS on a number of provincial policing committees and liaises with the Governments of Ontario and Canada, and other police and emergency service agencies to ensure Halton remains as safe tomorrow as it is today.

In his spare time, Deputy Chief Fletcher enjoys spending time with his family and is actively involved in the community, including spending most of his spare time on local soccer fields as a coach with the Burlington Youth Soccer Club.

Halton Regional Police Service Community Policing Administration functions under his command include: Community Policing , Human Resources, Training Bureau, Communications Bureau, Information Services, Court Services, Records and Administrative Support Services

Deputies Fletcher and Percy came to the Halton Regional Police service at the same time in 1984.    Has there been some rivalry between these two men ever since they came out of the police academy and put on uniforms with the same shoulder patch?

Whoever the new police chief is – that person will face a community that is seeing criminals from Toronto and Hamilton slip into Burlington where they sense the pickings are a little easier.  There was an LCBO break in during the early hours that required more than twenty minutes for a patrol car to arrive on the scene.  Maybe some tightening up within the ranks on the street is needed.

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Thief looking for cash – leaves fish and chip shop empty handed – gets his picture taken.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  December 15, 2011  Here’s a criminal who might have thought he had an easy score but after some  effort he had to leave the scene of his crime empty handed – but he did get his picture taken.  If you know this bandit call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes)

If you know this thug - call Crime Stoppers.

This all started just after 2:40 a.m. on December 5th, when a male suspect pried open the back door of Thistle Fish and Chips located at 3455 Fairview Street. Once inside, the suspect pried open a locked cash register and a desk drawer to search for cash. The suspect eventually left empty handed.

The suspect was captured on surveillance video and is described as a male, white, 5’7” tall, heavy build, short brown hair, and wore eyeglasses. He was wearing a green undershirt with a beige hooded sweatshirt, a blue jean jacket, black pants and black running shoes with a white emblem.

Assuming the police catch this one, the picture they take – the mug shot – will be a lot clearer.

 

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Handgun thefts and home break ins have Regional police busy.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  December 8, 2011 It was just after 1:00 am when three masked men burst through the front door of a Faversham Avenue home and stormed the bed room of one of  the residents demanding money and drugs.  The resident said there were no dugs in the house and the thieves left.  There were three other residents in the home at the time.

The suspects are described as follows:

White, 5’4” – 5’5,” 120 lbs, wearing all black clothing and white running shoes.

White, 6’4,” thin build, dressed in black.

Black, 6’3” – 6”4,” 150 – 160 lbs

The police would like to find these three. Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to contact the Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905 825-4747 x2315, Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-TIPS(8477), through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting ‘Tip201’ with your message to 274637(crimes).

Firearms theft has police worried:

Dangerous weapons stolen from Burlington home. Ammunition was left behind.

The Halton Regional Police Service is investigating the theft of several firearms after thieve(s) broke into a home in the area of Sherwood Forest Park, Burlington.  The break-in occurred on December 5th between 6:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. The front door had been forced open. The suspects stole five firearms, all of which were properly licensed and stored by the owner.

Missing are:

• Beretta, 92FS – 9 mm semi-automatic handgun

• Beretta, 90 TWO – 9 mm semi-automatic handgun

• SIG Sauer, SP2022 – 40 Calibre, semi-automatic handgun

• CZ75 – 9 mm semi-automatic handgun

• Bushmaster, XM15E2S, .223 Remington Shot – semi-automatic rifle

Ammunition for the weapons wasn’t taken.  The weapons were in the premises under a licence and are reported to have been properly stored.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call the Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905 825-4747 x2315, Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-TIPS(8477), through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting ‘TIP201’ with your message to 274637(crimes).

 

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A quick quiz and a $1 off coupon for a burger purchase; part of the Halton police high school RIDE program.

By Pepper Parr

BURLINGTON, ON  December 7, 2011 – Nelson High School students got a chance to learn just what happens when there is more alcohol in your system than the legal limit and a police officer asks you to walk a straight line.

Part of the training session included a quick quiz that was set out in a different news story that you can find at: https://www.burlingtongazette.ca/?p=5920

Two Nelson high school students do their best to stay on the green line wearing Fatal Vision goggles during a Halton Regional Police RIDE program.

Here are the answers to the ten questions the students were asked:

Question 1      False

Question 2      False

Question 3      True

Question 4      False

Question 5      False

Question 6      False – A G1 has to have a qualified driver with them – and being drunk means you’re not qualified – bit tricky that one.

Question 7      False

Question 8      False

Question 9      False – the licence is suspended for a period of 90 days

Question 10    True – but if you’re drinking and driving and the police have the evidence – there isn’t a lot your lawyer can do for you.

The students will have had problems with some of those questions – the media officer we went to for the answers had to look up the answer on more than one occasion.

Male students at Nelson High had just as much difficulty as female students trying to stay on the green line while wearing Fatal Vision goggles.

They also got a very up close experience with a breathalyzer and came away with a firm understanding of what the police do if they pull you over and ask you to blow.  And in the quick quiz the students did later in the training session they got to learn what they knew and didn’t know about the rules in place to control driving if you’ve been drinking.

It was a bit of fun and they got to laugh at their friends while they tried to walk the green line set out on the gymnasium floor.  None of them could stay on the line and most were nowhere near the line.

The day was part of the Regional Police RIDE program that had police officers at several regional high schools as well as being out on the streets with their cruisers pulling drivers over to politely ask if the driver had been drinking.  If there was any concern on the part of the police officer – the driver would be asked to breathe into a breathalyzer and perhaps try to walk a straight line.  Failure to do either of the requests and they are placed in a cruiser and taken to a police station.

The vast majority of people have not been drinking, although this year on the first day of the program in Burlington, three people were charged with driving while under the influence of alcohol.

For those that are clear the police hand out a small card, created by grade four and five students in regional schools.  The card does drive the message home.

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High school students get to see what happens when driving while under the influence of alcohol. Wasn’t pretty.

By Pepper Parr

BURLINGTON, on  December 7, 2011  – Nelson High School students – all 1500 of them were in the hands of the Halton Regional Police for a good part of Tuesday morning.  They were being taken through some “experiential training” on what happens to a person when their drinking has gone over the legal limit.

The experience was a bit of a shock to many of them.

This is the one thing you do not want to see should you be pulled over by the police. The smile on Cst. Mike Korda is nice enough - but that little grey box is not good news. If you don't drink and drive Korda will be your buddy.

Halton Regional Police have been attending at Halton high schools and showing students what breathing into the breathalyzer was all about; what happens to their bodies when they have consumed alcohol and are asked by a police officer to step out of the car and attempt to walk in a straight line and then to write a short quiz on what the rules are when it comes to drinking and driving.

Many of the parents of these students can remember a day when it was very common to say to a guest at a house party to “have one for the road” which meant you threw back a drink, thumped your chest and got behind the wheel.

Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) brought a very painful and realistic look to what happens when people drink and drive and as a result of their efforts we see programs like the one at Nelson High School.

HRPS Cst. Mark Vegso holds the "Fatal Vision" goggles students at Nelson High experimented with earlier this week. It was a strong lesson.

Each year the Halton Regional Police roll out their RIDE program – this year HRPS arrested three people for drunk driving on the first day of the program.  Seems like we have some distance to go yet before we rid ourselves of this menace.

The police take their rotating RIDE crews around the Region and stop traffic, ask drivers if they have been drinking, and if they suspect any use of alcohol they invite the driver to breathe into the little grey box and see if they can walk a straight line.

If the driver can’t – their car is impounded and they get taken to the police station.

Cst. Mark Vegso is one of the Regional police officers who is assigned to a high school, in his case it is a school in Oakville, where he handles small discipline situations, trespass problems and is in the school regularly to keep an eye on things and to also serve as a contact for students who want to talk to a police officer but don’t want to go to a police station.  Cst. Vegso also teach some law classes in the school.

Failure to provide a breath sample is also a criminal offence.  The police officers doing the training make the experience very, very realistic – there is little doubt in the mind of the student just what they are being asked to do and why.  Many of the students must have walked away from the breathalyzer table shuddering with the thought if they are ever asked to blow into the little grey box – they are in serious trouble.  The objective is that hopefully they will look for a lift before getting behind a wheel if they’ve been drinking.

The goggles used to experience what it is like to be asked to walk a straight line with alcohol in your body.  The goggles, which are made in Mexico and referred to as “Fatal Vision” goggles cost $1000. each.  But they do the job.

Staying on that green light with goggles that simulated an alcohol level over 70 was not quite as easy as this young lady thought it was going to be.

The students found that they could not walk a straight line – more frightening to all of them was that they couldn’t really see the line – it was just a blur and kept moving out of their field of vision.  The goggles used to simulate a situation where the user was slightly under the legal limit resulted in a scary experience.  The goggles used to simulate situations where the user was well over the limit – like 2.0 and up – made it very clear that driving with that much alcohol in you would result in your death or that of someone else you ran into.  And there was no doubt – you could not operate a car effectively or safely with that much alcohol in your system.  It was a pretty blunt message.

One wonders what these students said to each other as they gathered in the cafeteria for lunch with their lap tops open in front of them.  The Regional police  wondered and at the end of the training sessions – they left hoping they’d done the job.

Part of the training session included a quick quiz on drinking and driving.  Test results and more on the RIDE program are at: https://www.burlingtongazette.ca/?p=5937

 

1: The legal limit of alcohol to be present in your blood while behind the wheel of a motor vehicle is 100.  T/F

2: The legal limit for a G1 or G2 driver is 50.  T/F

3: A person can be charged with impaired driving after smoking marijuana.  T/F

4: It is acceptable for open alcohol to be inside your car. T/F

5: It is not a criminal offence to be intoxicated in the driver’s seat.. T/F

Friends look on a Nelson High student tries to keep his feet on the green line while using "driving under the influence of alcohol testing goggles".

6: G drivers who are accompanying G! drivers can be intoxicated while in the passenger seat. T/F

7: A person charged with Over 80 must always be charged with Impaired Driving. T/F

8: A person can refuse to provide a legally demanded breath sample and not be charged for refusing to provide a breath sample. T/F

Nelson High students write the ten question quick quiz. How would you have done with the test? Try it.

9: Upon being charged with Refusal or Over 80, a person’s driver’s licence shall be suspended for a period of 30 days. T/F

10: A police officer shall read you your rights to counsel upon arrest for Over 80. T/F

 

Being charged with any kind of a drinking related offence and found guilty will impact your driver’s licence – which is nothing compared to what it is going to do to your insurance rate.  While you may be allowed eventually to drive again – you may not be able to afford to – and if the car you were driving belonged to your  parents – they are not going to be very sympathetic.

Drinking is not a crime – just do so responsibly.

 

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Police record third traffic fatality in the Region for 2011

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  December 5, 2011  Burlington recorded its third traffic fatality for 2011 when Henry John Grasso of Brantford, Ontario was pronounced dead at the Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital after being taken their by Emergency Measures Services after being struck by an automobile at the intersection of Appleby Line at Harrison Court, just north of Dundas Street.

An initial investigation has revealed that the pedestrian, a 51 year old Brantford man, was walking eastbound in the north crosswalk when he was struck by a northbound Nissan Maxima.  The operator of the Nissan, a 25yr old Burlington man and his passenger, a 22 year old Oakville woman were not injured.  The woman however was treated at the scene for shock by paramedics.

Due to this being a fatality, members of the Collision Reconstruction Unit (CRU) were called in to take carriage of the investigation.  The intersection was closed for over 5 hours while Reconstructionists collected evidence and measured the scene.

This is the 15th traffic fatality to occur on roadways patrolled by Halton Regional Police for 2011, and the 3rd to occur in the City of Burlington.

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You need to be careful about what you do in the back of that cab. Surveillance Footage is part of the fare.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 28, 2011  –  Three youths got a bit of a surprise when they learned their pictures may have been on their Facebook page but it was also captured by a taxi driver who one of the three punched in the face hard enough to require hospitalization..

The  three hailed a taxi-cab in the area of Cumberland Avenue and New Street, Burlington and were driven  to their destination in the area of New Street and Appleby Line.  The taxi driver asked for payment.  The passengers became belligerent and it was apparent that they were not going to pay the fare.  The taxi driver turned his head to speak with the passengers in the back seat and was  immediately punched in the face by one of the passengers.  All three passengers then fled on foot.

With video surveillance in taxis now - they get to see the bad stuff and the funny stuff and if you're up to funny stuff - who owns that image?

The cab was equipped with video surveillance equipment that provided footage of all three suspects. The footage assisted police in identifying the suspects.  On November 25th, a 17-year-old Burlington youth was arrested and charged with:

• Assault Causing Bodily Harm

• Transportation Fraud

• Fail to Comply with YCJA Probation

The remaining youths, 15 and 17 years of age from Burlington, are being investigated for Transportation Fraud.   That footage will be shown in court – it will not be a pleasant day for the youths.

In this case the video surveillance helped solve a crime – but it appears as if the thing is on all the time.  Care to guess what the cab drivers will be watching when they get together socially?

[face]

 

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Halton police busy investigating the drug business in the community. It isn’t pretty.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 27, 2011  The Halton Regional Police Drug and Morality Unit initiated an investigation into the trafficking of cannabis marihuana and oxycodone in the City of Burlington during which they observed a person who has now been accused of trafficking in drugs  meet with another female in Burlington for the purpose of trafficking.  After the meeting was concluded the female was arrested. Investigators recovered a small quantity of the drug at that time.

The police then obtained a search warrant under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to search the residence of the accused.  Police came up with approximately 40  grams of cannabis marihuana, 24 grams of cannabis resin, 200 oxycodone pills (Percocet and oxycontin), indicia of trafficking and $425.00 dollars in Canadian currency.  The approximate street value of the drugs was $5175.

Marie VANDONGEN, 47 years, of Burlington was released from custody on a Promise to Appear and an Undertaking before an Officer in Charge. She had been charged with: Trafficking in Cannabis Marihuana, Possession of Cannabis Marihuana for the Purpose of Trafficking, Possession of Cannabis Resin for the purpose of Trafficking, Possession of Oxycodone for the Purpose of Trafficking

The laying of these charges suggests there is an active drug user community in the city.

Police are busy investigating and laying drug charges in the city. Is there a serious drug problem and should there be a different approach to handling drug offenses? And who is buying the stuff?

Halton Regional Police also initiated an investigation into a person residing at a Burlington area motel.  Police had earlier arrested a man after stopping a vehicle in central Burlington. The man was in possession of a half ounce of cocaine and several oxycodone tablets.  When police executed a Criminal code Search Warrant at the motel room where the suspect was residing they seized 1.5 kilograms of cannabis marihuana, a prohibited weapon (flick knife) and numerous pieces of suspected stolen identification.

Steven FENTON, 25 years, of Burlington has been charged with Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking (cocaine), Possession of a Controlled Substance (cannabis marihuana – over 30 grams), Possession of a Controlled Substance (oxycodone), Possession of a Prohibited Weapon, Fail to Comply with Prohibition Order, Possession of Credit Card Data (three counts), Identity Theft (five counts)

Tia MCCULLOUGH, 24 yrs, of Burlington was also charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance (cannabis marihuana – over 30 grams), Possession of a Prohibited Weapon, Possession of Credit Card Data (three counts) and Identity Theft (five counts)

These arrests are indicative of an active police effort to arrest drug dealers – and also tells us that there are people in the city buying the stuff.  All the drug dealers are doing is meeting a demand. Illegal, yes – but doing more to plug the demand side will lesson the supply side – and it is the supply side of the drug business that is really foul and dangerous.  The weapon found by the police was meant to hurt people.

Investigators remind the public to utilize Crime Stoppers to report on any illegal drug, gang, or gun activity at 1 800 222-TIPS(8477), through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting ‘Tip201’ with your message to 274637(crimes).

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Major sports events creates need for better TV screen. Break in at Burlington commercial building.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 24, 2011 – Thieves forced the door at a South Service Road location last weekend and then broke into a main floor office at 5045 South Service Road  and made off with a 47” Samsung LCD TV and a Nintendo Wii.

Tiger Cats are out of the Gray Cup – wonder what else the thieves want to watch ?

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes)

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Halton Regional Police Service Launch Holiday R.I.D.E. Campaign. They’ll getcha.

 By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 22, 2011  – The Halton Regional Police Service have started their holiday R.I.D.E. campaign – and have once again partnered with local students, businesses and community organizations for the sixth year to offer “RIDE 101”, a program designed to educate drivers, particularly young and future drivers, of the importance and responsibility while driving and the consequences associated to mixing alcohol or drugs and operating a motor vehicle.

R.I.D.E. is the acronym for Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere and was started in 1997 as a program to get control over the then increasing number of drunken driver fatalities on highways. There was a time when Christmas parties in private homes frequently had the host saying “Have one for the road”.  Like ashtrays – that phrase has disappeared but drinking drivers have not – R.I.D.E. will be out there in force.  If you’re dumb enough to drink and drive – keep your lawyer’s business card in your wallet – you will need it.

High schools from across the Region will be participating in the program.  Burlington’s Nelson High will be the participating school December 6th.

Amazing picture, amazing headache, amazingly stupid - a drunk driver.

The official launch will take place at Iroquois Ridge High School, 1123 Glenashton Drive, Oakville, where Halton Police RIDE 101 officers will team up with students from Iroquois Ridge to distribute RIDE 101 educational information, provide students an opportunity to test roadside screening devices and put all students through a series of simulated ‘road side’ sobriety tests during a fun, yet educational format.

The night component will entail members of the student council assisting designated officers in speaking with drivers of stopped vehicles during a R.I.D.E. spot check and distributing ‘Think of Me’ cards and information pamphlets on the consequences of impaired driving.  The ‘Think of Me’ cards are hand-drawn and coloured by grade four, five and six students and reflect on that child’s perception of drinking and driving.

The daytime component will be held within the school from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the spot checks will be conducted from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. out front of the school.

The Halton Regional Police are grateful for the community partners who are supportive of this worthy endeavour, including:  the Halton Catholic District School Board, the Halton District School Board, Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (M.A.D.D.), McDonald’s restaurants and Tim Horton’s.

 

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Openings still available for those interested in community police support training.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 21, 2011  –  Are you interested in learning more about the Forensic Identification Unit, the Tactical and Rescue Unit, or the Collision Reconstruction Unit? Are you curious to know what it’s really like to be a police officer? Want to know about fraud and identity theft prevention?

The Halton Regional Police Service still has spots available for the upcoming session of the Citizen Police Academy.  This informative and innovative program runs from 7-10 pm every Tuesday night for ten weeks, between January 24th and March 27th.

Each week participants are given presentations on various aspects of the Police Service. Just a few of the areas of the Police Service that are covered include Recruiting, Hostage Negotiations, Major Crime Investigations, Diversity, Police Training Unit, Polygraph, Morality/Drugs, and the Communications Bureau.

Halton Regional Police offering community, police support training. Application form on the web site

This voluntary program is designed for anyone who wants to improve their knowledge of their local Police Service, and policing in Canada in general. Preference is given to persons who reside in, work in, or own a business in the Region of Halton.

Sergeant Kim Hill, Community Policing Support, is the driving force behind this effort.  She can be reached at  905 825-4747 x4901 or be in touch with Wendy Gzechowski, Community Policing Support, 905 825-4747 x5042

There is more information on the HRPS web site along with an application form.

www.haltonpolice.ca – click on Community Policing/Public Safety & Education folder.

 

 

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Plains Road hair and nail salons experiencing a break in streak – bad hair day perhaps?

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 11, 2011  Between August 29th and September 10th, five nail and hair salons on Plains Rd, in the area of King Rd were broken into. In each incident the front door was smashed to gain entry. Small amounts of cash ranging from $10 to $100 were stolen. In one of the break and enter, a 42 inch LCD television was taken.

This type of petty crime is often the result of drug addicts looking for something easy and can be a signal that there are concerns about safety in the community..  The police know how to handle this type of situation but they need your eyes on the street.  Be vigilant.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes)

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Armed robbery at popular restaurant and break in at LCBO store – crime getting serious.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  November 3, 2011 Halton Police are really interested in talking to the three suspects that broke into a Liquor Control Board of Ontario store on Appleby Line at 4:48 in the morning.

The suspects used rocks to smash the front window and gain entry to the store and then grabbed about 70 bottles of assorted liquor, loaded it into a waiting truck and were gone before police arrived.  Typical smash and grab..

Thieves decided to stock up early on their Christmas Cheer - broke into LCBO and ran off with 70 bottles.

There is video surveillance that depicts three fully disguised suspects committing the break-in. All three suspects are believed to be male, at least one of which is a white male.

A few days later an employee of Bombay Chutney Restaurant, on Dundas Street in Burlington, was robbed of the day’s cash receipts.

The victim and two other employees had just closed the restaurant and all entered a vehicle that was parked out front. The employees were about to drive away, when the suspect appeared at the driver’s door. The suspect spoke to the driver (victim) indicating that he required some assistance with a broken down vehicle, but then told the victim that he had a gun and demanded money.

The victim refused to give up the money; however the suspect reached into the car and grabbed a bag containing the day’s receipts and fled.

There were no injuries and no gun was seen.

The suspect is described as:  Male, dark complexion, 5’7” – 5’9,” wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, a mask covering a portion of his face, black pants and running shoes.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-TIPS(8477), through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637(crimes).

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Getting tough to be a thief in Burlington. Police snatch two in serial thefts at Burlington Wal-Mart locations.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON.  October 31, 2011  Loss Prevention Staff pounced on two thieves at the Wal-Mart store on Fairview Street yesterday at 5:30 p.m.

The lone male suspect was caught outside the store with approximately $560 worth of stolen merchandise stuffed into a shopping bag. Police were brought in and further investigation revealed an accomplice, and the discovery of a parked vehicle belonging to the suspects.  The vehicle was loaded with additional stolen property.

Retail store cameras catch every move a thief makes - they see you even if you're not a thief

The same two suspects were already being investigated for another Wal-Mart theft that occurred on October 15th at the Dundas Street location in Burlington. In that incident the suspects loaded up two shopping bags with shaving razors and blades totaling $6000.

Two from Toronto were charged with multiple offences:

Steven BENNETT, 38 years, of Toronto has been charged with Theft Over $5000;  Theft Under $5000 and possession of Stolen Property Under $5000  They got this guy coming and going – look for some plea bargaining on this one.

Hali SNOW, 32 years, also of Toronto has been charged with theft Over $5000., theft under $5000., possession of Stolen Property Under $5000 and fail to comply with a Probation Order (two counts)  Ms Snow is clearly not a nice lady.

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These robbers weren’t amateurs – Break and Enter at electronics store results in $30,000 heist.

By Staff

 BURLINGTON, ON  October 21, 2011  – On October 20th at 10:36 p.m. Halton Police got an alarm call from the Future Shop, 3060 Davidson Court, Burlington.  Thieves had broken into a vacant store next to the electronics store, broken through the wall and began stealing.

Suspects stole approximately $30, 000 in electronics, including Apple iPads (second generation), BlackBerry Playbooks, and Beats by Dr Dre headphones.

The following suspect descriptions were acquired from surveillance video footage:

 

Safe, confidential place to help keep your community crime free.

Suspect 1 – Male, wearing a blue jacket with a white vertical stripe on the arms, black hooded sweater with the hood up, jeans, and gloves.

Suspect 2 – Male, white, mid to late 40’s, dark hair, wearing a black baseball hat, black coat, white running shoes, dark pants carrying a hockey bag,

Suspect 3 – Male, white, wearing a dark jacket, dark jeans, dark shoes, carrying a hockey bag.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-TIPS(8477), through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637(crimes).

 

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Confusing crime scene and Crime Stoppers information that doesn’t add up.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  October 27, 2011  This is an odd one.  Sometime last week unknown suspect(s) smashed the front glass door to gain entry to A1 Transmission located on 4179 Harvester Road. It appears that the lobby and the office were entered, however no items were disturbed. Total loss of the damage glass door is valued at $300.

Here is what is odd about this: – the break in took place sometime between 1:30 p.m.  and 8 p.m. on October 22nd, a Saturday – in the afternoon to early evening.

Wouldn’t the shop have been open at that time?

Fuzzy information on this Crime Stopper request for help.

The police report says that shortly after the break and enter, (hold it – they have the time as between 1:30 pm and 8:00 pm – confusing) a small modified blue Honda car was observed exiting the driveway at a high rate of speed. The vehicle was last seen travelling westbound on Harvester Road.

The whole story obviously isn’t here – but if you know something both Crime Stoppers and the police would appreciate your help.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes)

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Black four door sedan – with a spoiler – do you know of one ? Police would like to hear from you.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  October 21, 2011  The police need your help in locating a vehicle that struck a 12-yr-old girl, at the intersection of Appleby Line and Lakeshore Road, Burlington early in October.

It was 4:30 pm. In the afternoon, the girl had just exited her school bus and was walking westbound across Appleby Line when a vehicle travelling west on Lakeshore Road, turned north onto Appleby Line and struck her.

The vehicle ran over the girl’s foot, causing her to fall to the ground and scrape one of her knees.  As a direct result of being struck, the girl sustained a fractured foot.

The driver of the vehicle stopped briefly, but subsequently left the scene prior to police arrival. The police are looking for a male, non-white, 45-55 years old, short black hair (spiky), wrinkly face, with a high-pitched voice.  The driver was wearing blue jeans and a jogging style ‘Adidas’ jacket.

The vehicle is a black, 4-door sedan, with a spoiler on back.

The driver of the vehicle knew what he had done – he could have and should have remained at the scene of the accident.  For failing to do so – he just may spend some of his time in a jail cell – that will only happen if he is apprehended – and that will only happen if you help.  Keep your streets safe – make the call if you know anyone who drives a black four dour sedan with a spoiler on the back.  Police will take it from there.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to contact Detective John Ophoven at 905 825-4747 x2307, or Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222 TIPS(8477), the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637(crime).

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This give convenience store service a whole new meaning – pretty close to take out.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  October 20, 2011  Halton Regional Police Service is still investigating the theft of cigarettes from a convenience store in Burlington.

Sometime between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on July 24th, unknown suspect(s) entered the rear storage area of the Big Bear Convenience Store located at 450 Appleby Line and removed several cartons of cigarettes.  The suspect(s) then exited through the back door leading into a laneway.

The store was open for business at the time of the theft.  What – is someone kidding?  No insurance claim on this one – and you have to know that someone who knows the a store and how it operates was the one who provided the information to the culprits that made off with the smokes.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes)

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More than 500 regional residents had unhappy discussions with police officer during Thanksgiving weekend.

By Staff

BURLINGTON, ON  October 17, 2011  –  While Thanksgiving weekend is a bit behind us now – it is a date that will remain on the minds of a number of people in Halton Region who had unintended meetings with a police cruiser or an unmarked police car during the holiday.

Halton Regional Police report that laid the following charges:

 

Impaired Driving – 9 charges

Roadside Suspensions – 14

More than 500 people got to see this crest up real close and personal on Thanksgiving weekend. More than 500 calls to lawyers made later in the day.

Distracted Driving – 79 charges(including 43 in relation to hand-held devices)

Aggressive Driving – 405 charges(including 340 for speeding)

Seatbelt Offences – 22 charges

Prohibited Driving – 7 charges

Dangerous Driving – 4 charges

These were part of a national road safety partnership called Operation Impact and they will certainly have an “impact” on those that were pulled over.  The goal of the program was to remind drivers that an essential part of traffic education and enforcement is to save lives and reduce injuries on our roadways.

Assigned officers focused on behaviour that puts drivers, passengers and other road users at risk:  impaired driving, seat belt use and all aspects related to aggressive/distracted driving.  The focus resulted in a total of 540 Highway Traffic Act charges being laid.  Great day for the lawyers.

 

 

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