Jazz on the Patio - now an established annual event - August 13 to 14

By Staff

August 11th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Probably the best summer offering in the city.

The Performing Arts Centre has been pitting on their Jazz on the Patio for at least five years – it might be seven.

The talent they bring in is usually super.

JAZZ ON THE PLAZA – Four different acts over two days – taking place on the Performing Arts Plaza – all free – just get there early to get a seat.

WEEKEND OF AUGUST 13-14, 2022

Every summer, BPAC presents some amazing Jazz performers as part of our annual Jazz on the Plaza. This free outdoor event is attended by over 1,000 people annually.

Amanda Martinez will perform on Saturday August 13th at  4pm; Shuffle Demons will perform on the same date at 6pm

On the 14th Clerel will perform on Sunday August 14th at  2pm and Laila Biali will perform at 4pm

Amanda Martinez

Saturday,  August 13, 2022 at 4pm

Approx. 75 mins. No intermission.

Amanda Martinez a Toronto-based singer/songwriter whose music exultingly blends her unique Mexican and South African roots with flamenco soul.

Amanda Martinez is a Toronto-based singer/songwriter whose music exultingly blends her unique Mexican and South African roots with flamenco soul. Her solo CDs have garnered her multiple nominations for Latin Jazz Performer of the Year, and her songs have appeared on three Putumayo world music collections: Bossanova Around the World, Latin Dreamland and most recently, Cafe Latino. Her third and latest CD “Mañana” was helmed by GRAMMY-winning producer Javier Limón and is set for release in 2013. Limón, whose production credits include acclaimed singers such as Buika, Mariza and Diego el Cigala, hails Martinez as “one of the greatest voices in the world.”

Martinez has headlined at the legendary Blue Note jazz club, at the 2010 FIFA World Cup Festivities in South Africa, and at the 2011 PanAmerican Games in Guadalajara, and is now honorary co-chair of PanAm 2015’s Ignite program. She will be performing in a series of countdown concerts to the 2015 Games, as well as speaking at events connecting athletes and sports fans with musicians and art lovers.

“She captures the raw emotion and passion of Latin Music making us sit up and listen” – CBC Radio

SHUFFLE DEMONS

August 13th – 6 pm

These “demons” are energetic and move around when they perform. Lots of sound.

The Shuffle Demons are a high-energy Canadian band that blends virtuosic jazz and funk playing with eye-catching costumes and over the top stage antics to produce an incredible show. A hit at festivals all over the world, the Shuffle Demons are a crowd pleasing, full-on musical group that backs up wild stage antics with phenomenal playing by some of Canada’s most talented musicians.

The electrifying musical fusion that The Shuffle Demons brought to life almost 30 years ago has entertained audiences around the world with their genre bending sound. Saxophones, upright bass, and wild percussion backed up by incredibly solid musicianship and a highly entertaining show will leave you wanting more!

“It’s not every day you hear a band with three saxophones plus bass and drums with such solid energy that this band can serve.” – The WholeNote

CLEREL

Sun Aug 14, 2022 at 2pm

Approx. 75 mins. No intermission.

Clerel: A beautiful fusion of instrumentation layered with melancholic lyrics

Although he grew up singing with his grandmother, Clerel did not learn how to play an instrument until he was in University. We are thankful he picked up that guitar as he is now bringing us breezy and soulful music that earned him a spot on Stephen Colbert’s Late Show.

Living in Montreal, Clerel is Camaroonian born, a cultural influence heard and felt in his music. His music is also heavily influenced by American soul and jazz with deep roots in his experiences as an African immigrant living in the West. Experience the African drum beats coupled with guitar and trumpets in songs such as Lonely Dance. A beautiful fusion of instrumentation layered with Clerel’s melancholic lyrics.

LAILA BIALI

Sun Aug 14, 2022 at 4pm

Approx. 75 mins. No intermission.

Laila Biali – “ability to meld traditional jazz with contemporary pop so effortlessly that neither style seems out of place on the same record” – Spinner Magazine

Laila Biali takes the best of pop, rock, classical, world and soul, informs it with her expertise in jazz, and weaves it into her musical arrangements and original songs. Laila has presented her music at prestigious venues spanning five continents including the North Sea Jazz Festival, Tokyo’s Cotton Club, Peru’s El Festival Internacional de Lima, and Carnegie Hall in New York City.

The talented Biali is a multi-award-winning Canadian singer-songwriter and pianist and has toured with Chris Botti, Paula Cole, Suzanne Vega and recorded with and supported Sting. Her accolades include “SOCAN Composer of the Year” and “SOCAN Keyboardist of the Year” at Canada’s National Jazz Awards.

“It’s not every day you hear a band with three saxophones plus bass and drums with such solid energy that this band can serve.” – The WholeNote

 

 

Return to the Front page

Registration for fall recreation programs opens August 20

By Staff

August 10th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If we think Fall – will the Summer change?

Is city hall giving us the “bums” rush – talking about the fall recreation program while we are enjoying wonderful summer weather.

The City of Burlington’s fall recreation programs will open for online registration on Saturday, August 20.  Adult program registration begins at 9 a.m. and swimming and youth program registrations begin at 11 a.m.

All programs are currently available for viewing online at burlington.ca/recreation.

These two are pleased as punch with their effort.

Adult programs include sports, games, fitness, craft and art activities, social events, discussion and learning options and more for adults of all ages and skill levels. In-person and virtual courses are offered.

Aquatics offers a variety of programs including youth, adult and private swim lessons and leadership courses. There are also preschool, school age, youth, or leadership programs.

If you are interested in joining the Junior Redcoats or Burlington Teen Tour Band, email bttb@burlington.ca for more information.
Programs open for non-residents to register on Friday, Aug. 26, at 9 a.m.

Assisted Registration
Residents who need extra support or do not have online access to register for programs, can call 905-335-7738 for staff-assisted telephone registrations.

The customer service team is available through email at liveandplay@burlington.ca or 905-335-7738, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and weekends 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Recreation Fee Assistance
Recreation is for all, regardless of financial situation. Recreation Fee Assistance is funding made available to Burlington residents or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreation programs. For more information, or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance.

Two thins of concern:

The registration assistance – it is no longer a one on one situation – the help is at the end of a telephone line and getting through is said to be a challenge.

Add to the the price increases: No mention that the increases are steep.

 

Return to the Front page

Finding a way to recognize those that truly serve the community - city hall wants your ideas.

By Pepper Parr

August 10th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

 

The City of Burlington has amazing residents that do incredible work to support the  community.

Through the years, the City has had a variety of programs designed to celebrate and recognize community champions. In 1965, a program called Civic Recognition was started and evolved most recently into Burlington’s Best, where individuals were nominated by the community and recognized in several categories. A volunteer committee assisted in evaluating the nominations and determining the recipient of the award in each category.

As the City continues to evolve, we are looking for your input about the best way to celebrate and recognize the significant contributions of those who do work to support our community.

The city administration is looking for community input on what this new initiative could look like.

Click HERE to get the survey. Share your thoughts and ideas. It will take approximately five minutes.

Having monitored and attended these events for years the Gazette would like to make the following suggestions.

Parents should not be allowed to nominate and have their children accepted as worthy of recognition, the person nominating cannot be related tto the nominee.

The event should be free.

There should be a lot of food available.

It should be held in a location where hundreds can show up

Don’t have members of council involved in the decision making process – let them approve the program and then get out of thee way – Oh – maybe a photo op if they insist (they will) and let it go at that.

Gordon Schottlander – D Day landing survivor who came to Canada at the end of the ward and has served his community ever since.

The closest event we have seen that got close to what can and should take place is the recent Jubilee awards that were handed out to 73 people.  The problem there was people asked others to nominate them and a lot of people that seem to “collect” awards were once again recognized.  At the Jubilee event there was a single standing ovation given to 104 year old Gordon Schottlander .

Everyone who stood knew what they were standing up for – it was a wonderful moment.

These events are important but they should not become stepping stones into a political life.

For those who do complete the survey – think about what can be done.

Return to the Front page

The curtain will rise and the Season will begin - a SOLD OUT event in the first 30 days

By Staff

August 9th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The announcement today from the Performing Arts Centre  must have taken a lot of weight off the shoulders of people who have had to sit and wait for the lock-downs to be lifted.

There have been events at the Performing Arts Centre but it was far from the “show business” they were supposed to be doing.

The curtain for the Season will rise on September 15th.   Air Supply will be first on the programme.

The announcement read:  “After a long couple of years of pandemic closures, re-openings, and restrictions, The Burlington Performing Arts Centre (BPAC) is thrilled to be reopening our doors and sharing our 2022/2023 Season which begins September 15th, 2022.

Russell Hitchcock and Graham Russell’s mutual air zodiac signs, spent a decade at the top of the charts and released nearly an album per year for almost 20 years

September 15th Air Supply, the iconic Australian pop band that was founded in 1976 is back in Canada and kicks off our 2022/2023 Season. The band that was named for both Russell Hitchcock and Graham Russell’s mutual air zodiac signs, spent a decade at the top of the charts and released nearly an album per year for almost 20 years leaving a long legacy of love songs. Russell and Hitchcock will be gracing our stage, performing hits such as “All out of Love”, “Lost in Love”, and “Without You” on Thursday September 15th at 8:00pm.

September 20th, We are excited to welcome Tom Cochrane with Red Rider back to BPAC again this year on Tuesday September 20th at 8:00pm. Cochrane’s contribution to the Canadian music scene is immense and spans over 4 decades. Even after releasing 17 albums over the course of his career, filling larger arenas, theatres and festival stages, Tom Cochrane says those early days that built character and helped him find the content for many of his songs that he performs to this day, never leave him.

Tom Cochrane

Tom is one of only 3 male singer songwriters to have a diamond certified album in Canada, selling over a million copies. Songs such as “Life is a Highway” and “Lunatic Fringe” have made it to the international charts and will possibly be performed on our stage next month!

Johnny Reid

Our first SOLD OUT show of the Season is Love Someone – An Intimate Evening with Johnny Reid. Performing on Thursday September 29th and Friday September 30th at 8:00pm, there are only a few single seats available for purchase online. What a wonderful sign for the performing arts that everyone is ready to be back in the theatre!

Glass Tiger

Rounding out our first month of the Season is Glass Tiger on Friday October, 14th at 8:00pm. Enjoy iconic cuts like the 1986 release “Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” to their recently released album “33”. The new album takes the classic Glass Tiger sound with a new, raw, maturity that the band says is them coming back to their original roots of picking up a guitar and starting a band!

This is a show not to miss!

 

Return to the Front page

All Guilds annual exhibit ends on Saturday at the Art Gallery - fascinating place.

By Staff

August 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We all know how hot it is – and we might be running out of places we can visit where it is cool.

Apply COOL to the All Guilds annual exhibition that celebrates the guilds who make, learn, share, and teach at the Art Gallery of Burlington

There is the Burlington Fine Arts Association,

Some work done by a member of the Burlington Sculptors and Carvers,

Burlington Handweavers and Spinners Guild,

Latow Photographers Guild,

Burlington Potters Guild,

Burlington Hooking Craft Guild,

Burlington Sculptors and Carvers,

and the Digital Arts Guild of Burlington.

AGB Hours

Tuesday & Wednesday 10 AM – 9 PM
Thursday – Saturday 10 AM – 5 PM
Sunday & Monday CLOSED

 

Return to the Front page

Last week Council went for a $39million spend to build a new Skyway Arena - Stolte chose fiscal prudence and voted no.

By Pepper Parr

August 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

This is a long article.  It focuses on one new arena but sets out how this council is going to spemd to provide the infrastructure it thinks the city needs.  See it as a cautionary tale.

Council met on Thursday to decide if they were going to go forward with the construction of a new Skyway arena in ward 5.

Referred to as the Skyway Arena – the structure in place now was taken out of commission WHEN because it no longer met the rules related to Freon.

The rink was small.

The city did a lot of planning on this project – it was to be carbon free, solar panels on the roof, two regular size ice pads, pickle ball courts, community rooms and a walking track.

The new Skyway arena will be to the north of the proposed 6 story Lakeside Plaza development. Not a word was said about the development plans during the decision to spend $37 million

Way back when Councillor Paul Sharman was first elected he tried, in vain at the time, to get in touch with the owner of the plaza that had seen better days. It took a couple of years but eventually there was a development proposal that included eight structures.

During that time the Burloaks Park was completed – it is one of the better parks in the city that is seldom crowed that way Spencer Smith Park is.

The community amenities will include pickle ball courts, meeting rooms and a Walking Track.

This is the background behind the decision to spend twice as much as was originally planned on the Skyway arena.

The decision was to a contract for the construction of the new arena to Norlon Builders London Limited for $37,021,769.55

Staff asked that Council

Approve the revised total budget of $39,433,100 with revised financing proposed.
Authorize the additional funding of $2,000,000 from Tax Supported Debt; $403,000 from the Corporate Accessibility Implementation Project and $4,710,100 from the infrastructure renewal reserve fund.

Significantly looking structure for an arena – walking track, community meeting rooms and pickle ball courts make it more of a community hub. Something badly needed in the community.

What makes the development awkward is that it is a 1.4 km and a quarter away from the Bateman high school site that the city is in the process of buying – the public will not know much about the cost until sometime in September when the deal is expected to close.

The figure of $500 million was mentioned by Councillor Stolte, who was sanctioned by the Integrity Commissioner for revealing information that was discussed in a closed session of Council. The figure Stolte made public was, as she explained it, an approximation.

The Bateman and the Skyway arena are all about creating more in the way of space for a growth in population that will add three new communities to the city around the GO stations.

The Bateman and the Skyway development are in the south east sector

Lisa Kearns Councillor for ward 2 asked a procurement question, wanting to know how far into the process was the tender?

Staff had already decided who should be getting the job – all they needed was approval from Council to go forward.

Jennifer Johnson on the left, listening to a resident when public feedback was being gathered about the residential plans.

Jennifer Johnson, the staff member who oversaw the redevelopment of the WHICH ONE explained that three compliant bids and were ready to give the contract to Nolan for $37 million plus.

Given that Councillors are in the middle of an election Kearns wanted to be seen as being on top of everything said: “I’m looking to understand or hear what within the bid tender document and or agreed upon by those compliant bids would potentially help the city in a situation where the vendors work fell short or compliance with specs was not met. Those types of things. I want to understand what our insurance plans are, so to speak, so that we can be very much guaranteed that we have the best quality for our you know, the best quality when this work gets undertaken?

Johnson explained that “through our pre-qualification, we went through two rounds for general contractors where we asked them to qualify, electrical, mechanical and landscape because those were a very big component of the project. So they actually had to name the consultants they were using and had to close the bid with them. So through the pre-qualification process, we knew who those trades were, they were local trades, good trades. And basically, we pre-qualified five general contractors prior to even releasing the tender documents.

Solar panels on the roof will cover a lot of the electricity costs?

“Our specifications were very tight, because we tried our best to include designs that were all locally sourced. We also went through a review process with the consultants to ensure that all the equipment that we included in the design and specifications were still able to be sourced without you know, extended lead times. Contractors, are obligated to fulfill their contract under that lump sum.

The Skyway arena is in ward 5, Sharman territory. He said: Just slightly more than half of this cost is more than the city expected, but this is not a unique situation- that’s happening to everything. The question raised from time to time is should we wait for things to get better? The Staff report concludes that it’s going to be at least five years before the current pressure on costs decreases.This is not going to get better. If we don’t do it now.

It’ll just get worse and where does that leave us? It raises all sorts of concerns about improving the infrastructure in the city and increasing the infrastructure in the city. And we’ll have to cross that bridge when we come to it. But for now, I believe that we’re doing something that is badly needed by the city. We need the ice pads and the community rooms and the walking track.

Bateman won’t solve the ice pad problem, it won’t provide the walking track for the seniors who live in the immediate arena. And the pressure to build the pickle ball courts. So we’re going to be there. This is a wonderful addition to our recreation facilities in Burlington. Much needed, much appreciated. And we can just hope that cost isn’t going to be with us as a problem for ever.

Ward 4 Councillor Shawna Stolte took a much different position. “I’ve certainly brought up concerns before about the commitment to projects located 1.4 kilometers away from each other. We’ve made a huge commitment to debate and project and I just feel very uncomfortable with as Councillor Sherman has brought up the increasing cost of this which I know is realistic. I know that costs are going up across the country. We’re all aware of that. But the reality is too is that by utilizing the limited funds that we have available to us and the limited room that we have in our debt capacity limit, we’re committing most of our eggs into two baskets that are in the southeast corner of Burlington and I’m just not convinced that that’s an appropriate decision for us to be making at this time.

That walking track and a community rooms would be nice. I think that we could scale this project back to ensure that we have the ice rinks and I think that we could make sure that we have transportation options available to seniors to get them up to the proposed community rooms that we hope to have at the maintenance project. And that would leave us some funding available to ensure that we are able to take care of other infrastructure projects and that we have other opportunities to use our debt capacity limit because there certainly are a lot of a lot of other projects around the city that need attention. I wasn’t in support of this before. I’m still not. I know that it would be a great project if money were no object, but money is an object and I won’t be able to support this today.

Ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan said: “This is a higher price than we anticipated. No doubt about it. We’ve made the Skyway a priority for a long time. I believe we can still pursue upper level government funding and I’m sure we will but we can’t just bring everything to a standstill.

Ward 1 Councilor Kelvin Galbraith said: “I’m in support of this. I am part of the ice user group that knows there is a big need for another ice rink. It’s the ice users have been hurt for the last couple of years now that Skyway has been taken out of the inventory and replacing it with a full size rink is very important and will be very valuable to the ice user groups.

“I think the city needs more of these type of facilities and the longer we wait, the more expensive it will get. I think the time is now and I’m prepared to support this today.

Lisa Kearns put her financial concern, chase down the details spin on the building of a new arena.

Lisa Kearns joined what was now a majority of Council and said: “I think the whole conversation we’re having here is really reflective of the petulance that I’m starting to see around some of these really, really big ticket items. We know that we’ve already committed to prioritizing Skyway community centre and it feels a lot like this is one of those projects that we’re so far into that is difficult to turn around in, in response to escalating prices. Now, in my view, there are two things to look at here. One is of course the community value which we can’t put a price tag on it’s clear we do need more ice rinks. And in fact, we need the type of ice rinks that can host and hold tournaments and things of that nature so that we can really capitalize on those additional tourism dollars especially in light of having our municipal accommodation tax now ushered in so we do need to look at this really big picture.

“It’s one thing to award a tender. It’s another thing to award a tender with really strong terms that despite escalating costs still puts the city in the driver’s seat around ensuring the diligence used around those funds. Those are many types of causes like clawback clauses, there’s the dispute resolution, there’s payment terms certainty of terms limitations of liability. I want to be really really sure that when we are embarking on projects this high visibility and this high of a price tag we have covered all our bases.

The table below shows the change to the Total Project Cost over the last three years. The lowest compliant bid has resulted in an increased construction cost to $36.7 million, including soft costs, and project contingency, the new total project cost is estimated at $39.4 million (including the parks revitalization component). This is an increase of 22% from the Class A, most recently completed in March 2022 or $7.1 million.

It’s really important that we don’t have bumps along the way from today’s meeting where we’re proving this to when we can actually open the doors and welcome our residents across the city into a facility like this. I do want to also put on record and echo the comments of Councillor salty in that I am worried about our debt limit and our debt threshold. We still have a really big ticket in very similar proximity that hasn’t even had its capital costs disclose to the public yet. And that will no doubt require some support from our tax base and of course from our infrastructure renewal reserve fund so that fun will quickly be dwindling and it’s I’m hopeful that they’ll be a lot left for some of the other areas where we are really putting a focus on growth.

I am supporting this today with caution. And you know putting everyone involved in this in this project on notice that we want it to be an absolute and true success and we want it to be handled with the greatest level of diligence as possible.

The project was short 7 million – they dug into reserves and pushed $2 million onto the backs of the taxpayers – by taking out a 15 years debenture at 4.5%. Don’t you wish you could get that interest from your bank

Councillor Sharman added later in the meeting before the vote saying he recognized that his comments about money were made the way they were said because I think that it’s just a fact of life that cost is increasing. The arena had to be closed because the Freon system became illegal. Otherwise, we would have continued to have Skyway arena open, but it was grossly inadequate. It was built in the 60s. It was no longer up to standard in terms of installation and efficiency and effectiveness and it was undersized so it needed to go. So it’s going to be built. I think that’s one point with respect to money or No, I have a fairly reasonable understanding of money and my view of the world is very oriented towards future cash flow and where it’s coming from.

Paul Sharman: “I have no concerns about money.”

“I have no concerns about money, it will be resolved and especially in Parkland dedication, even if I do think it’s a bit rich it’s going to pay for a lot of stuff. We will still be building within the urban boundary. We will have the cash to pay for the facilities we need for another 70,000 people in the course of the next 30 years. And if anybody’s thinking differently than I ask you to talk to me, because planning and cash flow forecasting is an important way of thinking and I have no concerns about the money. And that’s about it for me. I’m delighted that we’re getting on with this.

Mayor Meed Ward decided it was her turn to take a kick at the can. “I am really looking forward to the ground-breaking in October. We know that we need more community facilities for our growing population period full stop – we are at capacity, we are bursting at the seams. This will be a facility that is used and loved by people from across Burlington the ice pads the community meeting space the parkour out front and also it will be really the future of how we build community facilities in Burlington. It will have solar panels on the roof. It will be a low carbon building, that is the future and we are not done yet. Our community amenities our parks or community centers have not kept up with the growth that we have seen in population in Burlington – this is one more opportunity to not only refresh what was there before, but expand it. The Walking Track is was really important.

It’s not so much about what we spend, it’s what we spend on and this there’s no question in my mind that this has been a priority. And so we just need to get on with it. We need to because the price isn’t gonna get any cheaper. And the cost escalation that we have seen is due to factors that are outside of the city’s control for sure and there’s no time like the present to get going.

This will put us at 11% debt ratio, our city imposed ratio is 12 and a half so we’re still well below that. The province imposes a debt ratio of 25%. Tax supported debt is only one of many sources of funding. We have reserved funds – revenue from users that will come back to us. I know the pickle ball courts will be very well used and played.

We have just increased and really level set the development charges that we will be charging for new growth and our Parkland dedication fees we were way behind, leaving money substantial amounts of money on the table.

I’m enthusiastic about finally getting on with this centre and we will mean we need more we’re not done we are not done yet with parks and community centres. Because we still have a lot more growth coming and we still have some catching up to do. And we have the money. We have the money to do it.

We do need a recorded vote on this. So I will turn it over to our clerk to take the recorded vote.

Councillor Bentivegna had some interesting questions and concerns about what was going to happen to the taxpayer.  His views will be covered in a seperate article later in the week.

Councillor stuck to her guns; the only Council member to talk about fiscal prudence.

City Manager Tim Commisso sat in on the meeting – didn’t say a word

Return to the Front page

Freeman Station to be open on Saturday - posters on Lakeshore Road will be in place all weekend

By Pepper Parr

August 5th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Lots to do in the weekend ahead of us.

Station will be open on Saturday

The Freeman Station is going to be open from 10 am to 3:00 pm on Saturday.   They will be accepting Food items for the Food bank; keep that in mind when you do your shopping.

Heritage week is coming to a close – the collection of signs depicting the city’s past will be up all weekend – word is they might be around for part of next week as well.

When David Craig came up with the idea for the large posters few thought they would be so popular.

When awards are being handed out for the bright ideas one has to go to Craig.

One of the best ideas in some time. The public got to see the historical routes of the city.

 

Return to the Front page

Lakeshore Road, south side at entrance to Spencer Smith - now a history classroom

By Staff

July 31st, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A must see.

The Burlington Historical Society has installed a dozen or so poster board setting out just some of the history of the city.

How many of then did you know about?

Worth the time.  Be quick though – the 2 foot by 4 foot posters printed on thin sheets of aluminum come down August the 8th.  The mostly black and white photographs are courtesy of David Craig.

 

Installed by the Burlington Historical Society

Return to the Front page

Michael Coren to Lead a Panel Discussion on Working for Peace at the Performing Arts Centre on Monday

By Staff

July 31st, 2022

Burlington, on

 

Superb summer weather. Why would anyone want to be indoors?

Perhaps something that will give your brain a bit of a buzz. No – not THAT kind of a buzz.

One where conversation and thoughts and different points of view on a daunting but critical subject.

Peace.

One Burlington meets at the Performing Arts Centre from noon to 4:00 pm on Monday.

Tomorrow, Monday, at 12:15 pm in the Studio Theatre Rev. Michael Coren, known for his controversial history as a conservative journalist and TV presenter before his change of heart and subsequent ordination in the Anglican Church.

Coren will lead a panel of thinkers on the subject of “Working for Peace”.

Panelists come from a range of experience as faith leaders and educators.

Two Prayer Rooms are available for a little private time away from the crowd.

Return to the Front page

Kid's Mini Fest - August 13th at three different city parks

By Staff

July 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There a number of commercial organizations in Burlington that go out of their way to give back to the city in which they do business.  Of course the events they sponsor keep their name in the public eye with a favourable view.

Nothing wrong with that and we congratulate those that see their role as working with the public to make Burlington a better place.

A fun example of this Giving Back is:

THE ROCCA SISTERS PRESENT – KIDS MINI FEST!

Saturday, Aug. 13, 2022 – 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

At three locations:
Brant Hills Park (2255 Brant St.)
Cumberland Park (562 Cumberland Ave.)
Millcroft Park (4520 Millcroft Park Dr.)

 

Great picture!

 

Return to the Front page

Burlington Golf & Country Club ranked 61st on a list of 100

By Staff

July 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington has its name on a new list.

A panel of 101 golfers travelled across the country and judged golf courses on nine criteria.

They ranked 100 golf courses and said that the Burlington Golf and Country Club was # 61 on their list

The course opened in 1924.

Ranked 61st out of 100.

The judges noted that the removal of many trees has made a big difference to the original Thompson design

So much for the urban canopy.

The SCOREGolf Top 100 courses in Canada.

What began as a grading of the country’s top 15 tracks in 1988 grew to a list of 25 in 1990, to 50 in 1994 and 100 by 2000.

Initially the ranking was completed by a small group of mostly golf professionals. Today the ranking is done primarily by public players or private club members.

The list is released every two years.

The Hamilton Golf and Country Club ranked #4

Return to the Front page

That neighbourhood party Meed Ward and Bentivegna attended - the rules were clear - no alcohol.

By Staff

July 27th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Gazette asked for some comment on the street party that was partially funded by the city and attended by the Mayor last weekend.

Here is the response from Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture:

“Love My Neighbourhood is a program that has been running for several years. It provides a one-time per year grant of up to $500 per neighbour, resident or street section, condominium, or apartment group in Burlington.

“Not all applications require the full $500 support. These funds support the neighbourhood with nominal costs associated with insurance coverage, equipment rental fees and entertainment with the neighbours also contributing to the overall event.

“Organizers must agree to provide a free and inclusive event or activity to their community. Invitations are often sent by the organizers to their local councilor or all members of council.”

There is a list of what is what is and is not covered by funding.

The information on the city website is crystal clear on alcohol and cannabis:

Is that wine in those glasses – maybe it’s water.

Is alcohol or cannabis permitted?
“The City will not fund or permit the purchase of any alcohol beverages, tobacco or cannabis products. Alcohol or cannabis products are not permitted at Love My Neighbourhood events or on public property.”

Here is the link to the rules for those applying for a grant – they are lengthy and they are very clear.

Director Glenn said: “To date, we have approx. 70 applications for 2022.”  And adds: “Hopefully this helps clarify.”

To some degree it does.  We will ask now if there is a procedure in place to recover the grant and will Glenn advice members of Council individually what the rules are?

The one thing this incident has done is raise the profile of the program.

Return to the Front page

New volunteer program launched to centralize all City volunteer opportunities

By Staff

July 25th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City has launched a new centralized volunteer program to better serve volunteer needs.

You can now access City volunteer postings in one place to learn how to get involved. All volunteer opportunities with the City can now be found at burlington.ca/volunteer.

Michelle Dwyer, Manager of Engagement and Volunteers doing a little volunteering of her own.

As volunteer postings are shared year-round, residents will be able to apply for opportunities in areas such as:

Adult Programs
Advisory Committees
Animal Shelter
Aquatics
Child, Youth and Family Programs
Festivals & Events
Skating
Student Theatre
Tyandaga Golf Course

Recruiting for fall program volunteer opportunities will be posted in August. We encourage residents to check out the fall positions for the Animal Shelter, Child, Youth and Adult Programs and Swimming.

People can create a profile through burlington.ca/volunteer to receive email updates on new opportunities as they become available. Each volunteer posting will include requirements for that opportunity which may differ depending on the scope of work.

Michelle Dwyer, Manager of Engagement and Volunteers said: “Our residents make a positive impact volunteering in our community every day. The City felt it was important to bring together all of the City volunteer postings shared across different platforms into one easy to find location. Our new volunteer program is intended to be helpful for everyone from students looking to complete volunteer hours for school to the active seniors giving back to Burlington.”

What Dwyer didn’t say is that the city also saves a bundle on staffing costs when volunteers take on the work.

Our understanding was that Volunteer opportunities were handled by Community Development Halton for the four municipalities in the Region where two Heather’s: : Johnson and Thomson were running a Regional wide program.

 

Return to the Front page

How far into the public trough will candidates shove their snouts ? Using neighbourhood program funds to throw a party for the Mayor seem to be Ok

By Pepper Parr

July 24th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

What would we do without attentive, sharp eyed readers who know the smell of dead fish when it gets near their nose ?

Here is what came in today:

Are you aware of this? This is from the Mayor’s Facebook page.

What a great way to campaign on the taxpayers dime and look like a hero at the same time.

Why are the taxpayers of Burlington funding private street/block/condo parties? So I can plan a party at my condo building and the city will help pay for it?

Our taxes are already high enough. Is she going to attend every one of these parties along with the sitting councillor for the area?

The timing of this seems very questionable. I discussed this with several people – they were all dumbfounded.

Would love for you to investigate and report on. I keep thinking that I must be missing something.

Why Mayor Med Ward thought this was acceptable – taking part in an election event that was paid for with tax payer dollars ?

It wasn’t just the Mayor that was sucking on the public “teat”; ward 6 Councillor Angelo Bentivegna was in their as well.

What the reader is referring to is a city program that was put in place to give neighbourhoods and opportunity to get to know one another better and to improve parks, playground, spruce up the ravines.

The deal was, the last time we looked at it was the people applying had to come up with half of the amount they wanted to spend.  That half could be “in kind”.  The purpose of the grant, in the past at least, had to be spelled out and reviewed by Parks and Recreation.

Sparks will fly on this one.

It was a good program.  I doubt very much that this version of the program as it played out was approved.

I expect bot the Director of Parks and Recreation, the people who run the program and the City Manager will be making phone calls on Monday.

The stunning part is that the Mayor was quite alright with seeing tax payers dollars used to pay for a campaign event.

You wonder sometimes just how far a politician will put their nose into the public trough?

The purpose of the Love My Neighbourhood program is set out pretty clearly on the city web site:

Director of Parks and Recreation Chris Glenn has this to say about the program: “Now more than ever, we need to build our sense of community and connections with our neighbours. This program is designed to help remove some barriers and build stronger connections among neighbours and communities by putting people together and having fun.”

Return to the Front page

It became clear to a packed room at the Art Gallery that something wonderful had taken place - the best in us was on display

By Pepper Parr

July 22nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Part 2: Queen’s 70th Jubilee celebration

Half way through and Karina Gould calls for a break – asks people to mingle, get some coffee, juice, maybe a cookie.

This crowd didn’t need any coaxing.

What the room experienced, and by this time the extent of what was taking place was very clear.  The city was getting a look at people who have made the city what it is.  Gould explained that the 150 word descriptions were written by the nominators – Gould’s office just typed it out.

Everyone knew some of the people who were recognized but I don’t think anyone knew all of them.

The whole was greater than the sum of the parts and we could see it – it was in the room with us.

The list of those being called forward continued..

William Leggitt
Bill has led many local and international projects through the Rotary Club, including the development of vegetable and fruit gardens in Guatemala, providing latrines to communities without water, and enabling clean water projects. He regularly participates in local food drives, fundraisers, and had worked to support the sponsorship of refugees. Bill always gives the best of himself to make his projects successful.

Lisa Lunski working with a volunteer at Wellington United Church

Lisa Lunski
Lisa has been the leader of Friday Night Community, a community service organization that has provided no-cost meals as well as clothing, snacks and so much love and care to people in the Burlington community. During the pandemic, she pivoted to support the community with pickup and drop off meal options.

John MacMillian
Born in Cape Breton, John joined the Canadian military and became a paratrooper. After moving to Burlington, he started his own company which grew to include 65 employees. John has been a leader in community AA groups for over 52 years and has mentored and counselled thousands as they overcame their addiction to alcohol, enabling them to return as healthy members of their families, workplace and our community.

Nick Manz
Nick has been the President of the Burlington Centaurs Rugby Club since 2017. Through his volunteer efforts and leadership, he has raised the rugby club from the lowest branch division to one of the top clubs in the Province with the Men’s team competing in the highest level of representative competition. Nick has increased the rugby club’s community involvement with a focus on the youth by growing the sport at the grass roots level. He actively supports women in sport in leadership roles and has recently created the Mixed Ability Rugby program, and inclusive sport program for the community.

Brian Mather
Brian had a major stroke while he was a university student. Since then, he has been involved in Burlington Stroke Recovery, and has been the President for 25 years. He also started Halton Stroke Fellowship, and during the pandemic, he regularly made calls to all members, to check in on them. He also happens to have a beautiful singing voice!

Jim McDonnell
Jim has a genuine interest and energy for helping others. He is the current President of Able Sail, a 45 year volunteer at the Sailing and Boating Club, an active Rotarian, an usher at his Church, and a member of the Burlington Seniors Centre. He didn’t let COVID slow him down, and worked to ensure he gathered friends for safe outdoor exercise, and remained fundraising for important local and international causes. His ‘formula’ for thriving as an older adult is “stay connected, stay curious, and keep moving as you help others every day.”

Blair McKeil
Blair has been deeply involved in marine transportation for most of his life, and lead his family business McKeil Marine, growing it to one of Canada’s largest marine transportation companies. Although no longer involved in the day-to-day, he provides support and mentorship. He supports countless organizations in youth, education, arts, innovation, environment, hospice care, business and much more. Blair’s focus and personal sense of duty to his community is evident in all that he does.

Nancy McKenzie
Nancy began a unique initiative during COVID called Meals of Hope, which now runs five shifts out of Port Nelson United Church. They supported Wellington Square and Gore Park Community Outreach Program. She is an active participant in a Winter Clothing Drive and supports the LGBTQ2+ community through Affirm Ministry Group.

Linda Simmons conceived of and launched Writing the Rollercoaster – Stories of Riding Out the Pandemic in Burlington. She is proudly wearing her Jubilee pin.

Sylvia McNicoll
Sylvia was a part of Writing the Rollercoaster – Stories of Riding Out the Pandemic in Burlington. She helped to record videos, offered free writing workshops, read submissions, and edited stories. Writing the Rollercoaster launched in September 2021 to the delight of the authors and readers. The book was also offered free of charge to the public at various locations throughout Burlington.

Raffick Rennie Mohamed
Raffick has been involved in the community for 50 years. He has had many roles at McMaster University and Humber College, was on the St. Mathews Committee for English for Immigrant Mothers, and has been involved in the Burlington Mundialization Committee, the Halton Islamic Association, HMC Connections, and the Syrian Refugee Sponsorship Committee.

Sam Muia
Sam is one of the most energetic and positive volunteers at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. He is always smiling, enthusiastic and willing to help in any way he can. He is a strong presence in the warehouse and donation area when he is volunteering. Sam is always happy to chat with donors and let them know why their support is so key to our success, and he never steers away from heavy lifting.

Dr. C. Rajasekara Murthy
Dr. Murthy has made contributions, nationally as well as internationally, devoting over 35 years as a Senior Research Scientist at the Centre for Inland Waters and Professor at McMaster. One of his major achievements was the establishment of the Karnataka Environment Research Foundation, an NGO in Bangalore, India. Dr. Murthy represented Canada in several international Scientific and Technology transfer initiatives through UNESCO/UNDP/ UNEP, and the WHO. As Scientist Emeritus, he is still very active in mentoring, visiting professorships at major institutes and conducting international lectures.

Louise Paddock
Louise volunteers at her church and within apartment building’s community. She has created the Three C’s Program at her apartment, Crafts, Cooking, and Conversation, which has been a bright light for many residents. She also helps with grocery delivery, and bake sales, fundraising for local charities.

Brent Paszt
Brent has been involved in Rotary for many years and has chaired Ribfest numerous times, garnering lots of support for the community. A previous Board Member at the Carpenter Hospice, he chaired the Hike for Hospice. All this while raising two lovely daughters.

Stephan Pichocki

Stephan Pichocki
Stephan is a key figure in the Ukrainian community in Burlington. For 17 years he has been the President of the Tyrsa Ukrainian Dancing school, and a member of Holy Protection Parish Council. He is also a member of the Downtown Business Association. Since the war in Ukraine began, he has worked to support Ukrainians at home and abroad. He has organized a rally, cochaired a fundraiser concert, acted as an interpreter with HMC, collected monetary and physical donations, and helped refugees settle.

Connie Price

Connie Price
Connie is a prominent figure in Aldershot and advocate for seniors. Within her active involvement at St. Matthew’s Church, she has participated in a number of initiatives including food collection drives and providing free masks to the public. Connie works with Parks and Recreation to provide senior outdoor exercise areas around the city, has pushed for park upgrades, and works to ensure seniors in the community stay informed.

Janice Skafel

Mae Radford
Mae has had an extensive nursing career. She was as a volunteer manager at VON Hamilton and oversaw multiple community health support services. She also served on Burlington’s Advisory Committee on Violence Against Women, the Ontario Human Rights Commission, the Board at Joseph Brant Hospital, the Carpenter Hospice, and the Rotary Club. In Mae’s words… “As a nurse, my interest has been to care for people, to help them achieve comfort and relief from any pain, physical, mental, emotional or spiritual”

Shirley Robinson
Shirley has served so many in need in Burlington. She was an outstanding volunteer at the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, St. Patrick’s Conference, the Catholic Women’s League, and the Compassion Society. In her many roles, she has paid social visits and acted as a listening ear, delivered food, and run food drives.

Nancy Romic
Nancy manages Shifra Homes, supporting young pregnant woman and mothers. She has turned this wonderful home into a sanctuary for women and their families to come to rely on. A mama to many, her generosity and kindness, her ongoing commitment to these young women and their children’s futures is inspiring and deserves recognition.

Amy Schnurr
Amy is an environmental leader in our community as the Executive Director of Burlington Green. Amy is a shining example of community contribution and does so without a public spotlight. She has nominated so many other volunteers for awards over the years and her tremendous contributions are also worthy of recognition. She has also served as the chair of the Save General Brock Park Committee.

Gordon Schottlander

Gordon Schottlander

Gordon is a WW2 and D-Day veteran, who fought alongside Canadian soldiers. He has given his time to the Chamber of Commerce, the Burlington Planning Board, the YMCA Planning Committee, the Knights of Columbus, St. Gabriel’s Church, the Moon in June Race, and was founding chairman of the Burlington Family YMCA, and much more. He is a family man (he has 15 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren!) a businessman and has received the key to the city.

This one was special.  With his certificate in hand Gord stood during an extended standing ovation.   Proud, grateful this 104 year old soldier stood tall.

Rene Schuster
Rene is the founder and leader of the Burlington Dad group, which serves a pivotal role within the community of Burlington. Under Renes leadership the Burlington Dads have raised over $400,000 for local charities and families in need. Without Rene this couldn’t have been done, not to mention his community group has a following of over 5000 members now. Rene with the Burlington Dads hosts several events a year for the community of Burlington.

Dennis Scott
Dennis has dedicated his life to fostering inclusion within his community. As the Chair of the Halton Black History Awareness Society, he ensures that Black history is taught as Canadian history. He also supports the arts community through the Halton Freedom Festival. Through his dedication and perseverance, Dennis worked to ensure that Burlington was the first city to declare Emancipation Month in North America.

Elaine Scrivener
Elaine has served with the Burlington Volunteer Bureau, Burlington Downtown Business Association, Junior League of Hamilton-Burlington, Boards of Joseph Brant Hospital and Foundation, Burlington Art Centre, Burlington Downtown Partnership, Community Development Halton, and the Burlington Museums Foundation. Elaine recognizes the importance of her role as mentor, and sustainer and actively steward new volunteers into community engagement alongside her husband Bernard.

Lynda Simmons
Lynda Simmons conceived of and launched Writing the Rollercoaster – Stories of Riding Out the Pandemic in Burlington. Lynda worked to create writing videos, offered free writing workshops, read and edited submissions, and planned a launch event. The book launched in September 2021 to the delight of the authors and readers. Copies of the books were also offered free of charge to the public through the library system and businesses across the city.

Janice Skafel
Janice Skafel has been a tireless supporter of refugees assisting more than four families to come to Canada and settle here over more than twenty years. She worked within St. Luke’s Church to form the Burlington Downtown Refugee Alliance and has acted as chair. She also organizes Advocacy Breakfasts which brings in guest speakers. An invaluable leadership skill is her ability to encourage and enable others to bring their own unique talents and abilities and to contribute and lead.

Richard Slisinski
Richard has been involved with the Polish National Union of Canada for 27 years, having held positions as President, VP, Treasurer and more. He has never ended energy and devotion and is constantly fundraising for events. He has also volunteered with Halton Region Youth Soccer for 20 years as a coach and mentor, acting as a shoulder to lean on for many youths.

Murray Sutherland
Murray Sutherland has been the Colour Guard Commander with the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 60, in Burlington, and is now the current president. He has spent countless hours organizing Remembrance Day parades for the last 15 years and has acted as a mentor for many members. His write ups have been used in books, he has spoken at the US Department of Energy, and was invited by the International Energy Agency in Paris to present his take on the emerging energy scenario. He has also taught Oil, Geopolitics and the Middle East at McMaster University.

Rashid Husain Syed
Rashid is a global energy expert, having writing extensively and spoken around the world. He is a regular columnist in the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail, Arab News, and other outlets, and has had his work featured in a book. He has chaired several global industry conderences and also occasionally teaches at McMaster University.

John Tait
John was President of the Burlington Rep Hockey Club, the Eagles from 1997 – 2020. John has consistently stressed the importance of not only skill development, but the personal growth of the athletes as people. During his time as President of the Eagles, he fostered the growth of the Gift of Giving Back, which has since raised millions of meals and hundreds of thousands of dollars in financial support for local beneficiaries such as the Salvation Army, The Burlington Food Bank, Food for Life, the Compassion Society, Halton Women’s Shelter, the Carpenter Hospice and the ROCK.

Joseph Tassoni
Joseph is a leading member of the downtown Burlington community and innovative fashion designer. All of his product in locally and his nominator can be quoted as saying “I have seen him late at night cutting and sewing away!”. He supports the Joseph Brant Hospital Foundation, the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation, and the Halton Women’s Place. Joseph is a great resource for other businesses owners, always encouraging and supporting them.

David Vandenberg

David Vandenberg
David has served in volunteer leadership positions within over 10 organizations and helped raise over $350,000 for charities and non-profits. Recently, he helped lead the meal program at Wellington Square. He now is an Advisor for Canadian Tire Jumpstart where he manages the builds of their national inclusive play projects.

Peter John VanDyk
Peter is an incredible ambassador for Burlington, philanthropically and in the business community. He volunteers his time with the Sound of Music Festival, the Burlington Holiday Market, the Taste of Burlington, the YWCA Hamilton, and many more. No matter how busy he is, he always seems to find ways to support other businesses & include those left on the sidelines.

Roy Voorberg
Roy has been an Auxiliary Constable with Halton Regional Police for the past 25 years. Each year he has volunteered hundreds of hours assisting sworn officers on patrol, doing RIDE stop checks, at large scale community events like Sound of Music or Ribfest, managing traffic at road races, doing searches for lost individuals, canvassing for evidence, home safety evaluations for the public and a myriad of other community-safety oriented tasks. He has mentored dozens of new Auxiliary Constables over that time and has been a Sergeant for much of the last decade providing administrative support, training and moral & morale support for those reporting to him. Whenever there’s an issue, he’s the pillar we’ve turned to.

Sheila Waldron
Sheila is a volunteer with Crafts, Cooking, and Conversation. She has also given her time to arrange theatre visits for members of the group, promoted reading and walking, and helped out in the community garden. She remains a regular volunteer at Joseph Brant Hospital.

Dean Walker
Dean Walker has made immeasurable contributions to a more inclusive Canada, especially for Deaf Canadians. Dean founded the Burlington Association of the Deaf and has been an advocate and expert in equity and access. He has contributed to policy in provincial legislation and worked to accommodate deaf individuals in the justice system. He has volunteered with the Ontario Association of the Deaf, for 25 years, acting as Executive Director for 3 years. He has also coached the 1981 Ontario Deaf Olympics basketball team and was Head Coach for the Deaf Canada baseball team in the 2000 World Tournament.

George Ward
George is a longtime resident of Burlington and has been active as a volunteer in many causes throughout the years, especially in politics. George believes in getting involved w

Return to the Front page

Citizens recognized for their community work at the 70th Queen's Jubilee

By Pepper Parr

July 22nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The event was originally going to be held in Civic Square – extreme heat killed that idea – so it was held at the Art Gallery

73 citizens were going to be recognized for their contribution to making Burlington what it is – they were publicly recognized by Karina Gould, Burlington’s Member of Parliament and a member of Cabinet along with Mayor Marianne Meed Ward.

Names were announce and a 150 word – max – description was read and the person came forward.

The Gazette has been covering the city for more than ten – we knew many of the recipients – but there were many we did not know.

And some of the things they did were remarkable – all simple acts, done with little in the way of fanfare.

Some paused before they stepped up to the platform and did an ever so slight bow then stepped in between the Mayor and the MP.  Mayor Meed Ward presented the certificate which was bound in a vert attractive leather case.

Along with the Certificate was a pin signifying that the person was recognized as one recognized in the Queen’s 70 Jubilee.

MP Gould urged people to wear their pins.

The recipient are:

Robert Ankrett
Bob is a key volunteer at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 60, organizing many events and focusing what the Legion stands for. Some of Bob’s milestones at the Legion include memorializing 28 WW2 veterans, arranging anniversary ceremonies including Remembrance Day, bringing the veteran banner program to the city, and curating memorabilia for the Legion Museum.

Leslie Bell
Les served as the president of the Burlington Soccer League for almost 30 years, and Tournament Director of the Ken Bradwell Soccer Tournament for 4 years. He has also been running a series of trivia quizzes called “Let’s Get Quizzical!” to raise funds for Joseph Brant Hospital, Oakville Trafalgar Hospital and Juravinski Cancer Centre. Les is a great friend and naturally gifted spokesman and compere which was recognized during his work life at RBC.

Robert Bennett
Robert has acted as the managing director of the Burlington Teen Tour Band for over 40 years. Robert has provided outstanding leadership, direction, friendship and sometimes comfort to the members of the band. He always provides positive encouragement to the legions of youth who have passed through the band program.

Catharine Benzie
Catherine is a dedicated volunteer at the Burlington Public Library. Catharine has an inclusive and approachable leadership style and acts as the Chair of the Board. She has worked to make the library safe and welcoming for everyone and has contributed to the development of two BPL strategic plans. Catharine also volunteers at Pineland Public School, and makes Burlington a better place to live, play, and work.

Raj Beri
Raj had a distinguished career as a Hydrographic Surveyor and for 37 years has been the President of Arya Samaj Burlington. Under his leadership, Raj has facilitated donations to women’s shelters, homeless shelters, the Joseph Brant Hospital, the Carpenter Hospice, and food banks. He also organized church services and cultural and social events for the community to enjoy. He always promotes inclusiveness and acceptance.

Lesline Bess
Lesline is a retired nurse and has given her time to St. Christopher’s Anglican Church for many years. She tends their gardens, and packages donation barrels to send to St. Vincent for those in need.

Hilda Binns
Hilda is a decorated athlete, having medaled at multiple Paralympic and Parapan American games. She also acted as an ambassador for Canada at the 2012 Paralympics. Hilda was a founding member of the Ontario Wheelchair Sports Association and for several years Hilda was national membership conveyor for the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association. Hilda was successful in having Hamilton put in corner curb ramps and having Burlington lower walk signal buttons. She taught children about disabilities in schools, bringing her 58 medals for them to try on! She also volunteered at the Grand River Correctional Centre for Women and as a wellness checker for the community.

Marianne Bromley
Marianne has been a leader in Girl Guides for over 35 years. In that time, she led all the different age groups: Sparks, Brownies, Guides, Pathfinders and Rangers. This is a commitment from the heart as she was involved with Girl Guides as a youth and received the highest award in Guiding, the Canada Cord. She has travelled with different groups to The Chalet in Switzerland, Pax Lodge in London, Netherurd House in Scotland and several national camps in Canada.

Ken Brooks
Ken was one of the founding members of Friends of Freeman Station in 2011 and continues to be one of its most dedicated and hardworking volunteers. In the past year Ken has spent hundreds of hours helping refurbish a 1929 CPR caboose with his hands on carpentry skill while also leading a crew of other volunteers. This valuable artifact would not be available to the citizens of Burlington and the surrounding area without Ken’s amazing contribution.

Dorothy Brownhill
Dorothy has volunteered for over 25 years at St. Christopher’s Anglican Church, and has volunteered for all her life. Her current project is creating snack packs for those experiencing housing homelessness in Hamilton’s Gore Park. She and her group support around 300 people every single weekend.

Rick Burgess

Rick Burgess
Rick has a strong volunteer presence in our community. He has generously given his time to the Burlington Community Foundation, the Halton Police Board, the Chamber of Commerce, Tansley Woods, John T. Tuck Public School, the Burlington Holiday Market, Creative Burlington, the Burlington Museum Foundation, and many more. He is a committed and dedicated resident of Burlington and has received a number of awards for his contributions including a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Stuart Carrothers
For the past decade, Stuart has cared for some trees on the property of a public school that back on to his yard. He will prune the trees, water them, and repair any damage, all out of his own pocket. He says he does this as the school board may not have the resources and that it is good to care for and plant trees whose shade you do not expect to always sit. His son who nominated him shared that “I know it’s a small thing but sometimes the smallest things take up the most space in your heart”.

Ian Chan
Ian is the co-owner of Code Ninjas Burlington. Recently, he has been volunteering on the Six Nations Reserve to help older students and teachers learn how to code, so they can then teach younger grades in a culturally appropriate way. When the Mohawk language teacher was set to retire, Ian quickly found a way to integrate Mohawk into the coding curriculum. Ian also set up “teacher sessions” within Halton to teach basic coding to educators and started a program at Code Ninjas to match children living in poverty with community sponsors so that they can have the opportunity to learn.

Gabriela Covaci
Gabriela has worked to support newcomers to Canada since arriving from Romania in 2003. Gabriela is an amazing role model and mentor for anyone that came in touch with her, has been an active volunteer member in the community. She has founded a non-profit, mentored young women transitioning into technical fields, been an ambassador in the Halton for All Campaign, chaired the Halton Region Newcomer Strategy Project, fundraised for women in transitional housing, and authored books. She did not stop during the pandemic and pivoted to help support people.

 Rick Craven
A former city and regional councillor, Rick is a strong advocate for Aldershot. Rick founded the Aldershot Community Council, as well as Partnering Aldershot and the Partnering Aldershot Newsletter. He worked to form the Aldershot BIA, to help drive local business improvement. He has inspiried others by being the initiator of so many projects, a community builder, energizer of the team, preserver of the history, a mentor to many, and true champion of the cause

Craven took Zoom; there wasn’t a chance that he would stand with the Mayor and receive his certificate

John D’Addario
John has been a member and leader of the Knights of Columbus service club for many years and seems to have boundless energy to serve. He is very much an “idea” man and comes up with all sorts of ways of fundraising for the community. Thank you for your years of generosity and teamwork, John.

Maria DiDanieli
Maria represents our health care industry at its best. Through her work at the Burlington Family Health Team, she serves the community selflessly. Her “people-person” nature shines through in in the amount of work she is doing to impacting people’s lives in a positive way.

Mary Dilly
Mary has a true compassionate spirit. She helps women leaving the Halton Women’s Place resettle with donated furniture that she collects. She has started a business helping seniors downsize and move into seniors’ residences around town. Mary helps to run a sit-down Christmas dinner for the community and has also fostered 13 service dogs!

That 13th dog took part in the presentation – didn’t bark

John Doma
John was appointed by the Slovenian Ambassador as Honorary Counsel for the Republic of Slovenia. John continues to wear this voluntary hat with honour, passion, commitment and respect. His main driving forces are to build bridges and collaborative sustainable relationships between the two countries. John is also the President of the Canadian Slovenian Chamber of Commerce and volunteers at free tax clinics, sport coaching, and supporting startup businesses.

Marilyn Fish
Marilyn has always taken care of the community. Always an advocate for safety, she had the speed reduced on the straightaway of her street and the bus stop changed to her front yard to see the children safely off to school. She was involved as a leader in Girl Guides, dragon boating, and is now involved in the Art Gallery of Burlington Weaver’s Guild, acting as the treasurer.

A proud daughter taking a picture of her father

Family members would walk to the stage behind the parent that was being recognized and take pictures

Leanne Forsyth
Leanne is a survivor of human trafficking and now an advocate for supporting survivors and raising awareness. Her strength and resiliency shine through in everything she does.

Roki Fukuzawa
Roki volunteers her time with the local Halton Breastfeeding Connection program which provides free mother to mother telephone support for breastfeeding mothers. This is very impactful to the new mothers as having support from a recent breastfeeding mother provides comfort that someone has gone through all the ups and downs of breastfeeding and can offer tricks and suggestions when problems arise. As Roki is fluent in three languages (English, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese) she is usually paired with new mothers who do not speak English or would prefer to have support in their mother tongue.

Lisa Garland
Lisa brings value to Home Suite Hope. Lisa is the Board Treasurer and has supported individuals as they move through the program. She is also involved with the gymnastics club and leads finance related Life Skills Modules and Income Tax sessions. Lisa has fulfilled her commitment to HSH and is now joining the Joseph Brant Hospital board.

Donna Gillies-Marson
Donna has been giving her time, talents and heart to many over the years. She recently retired as a teacher for Blind and low-vision individuals. She has served with the Children’s Aid Foundation of Halton, Burlington Meals on Wheels, and has helped to increase awareness for stem cell donations when her close friend’s lost their daughter to cancer.

Pat Gilmore
Pat began a unique initiative during COVID called Meals of Hope, which now runs 5 shifts out of Port Nelson United Church. They supported Wellington Square and Gore Park Community Outreach Program. She is an active participant in a Winter Clothing Drive and works to stock Port Nelson’s lending library with books.

Marion Goard

Marion Goard
Marion co-founded 100 Women Who Care Burlington, a philanthropic giving circle that supports a variety of charities and initiatives that serve the Burlington Community. The group has raised a collective total of over $192,000 for over 30 charities.

Eunice Gorman
Eunice makes time to help anyone in the community. She assists the community by removing garbage and keeping the streets clean and helps seniors stay active.

Barb Guilfoyle
Barb serves on the Dare to be You team as well as at Halton Women’s Place. Her kind and compassionate spirit to always lend a helping hand is unwavering. She never seeks recognition and has consistently and generously volunteered her time with numerous community organizations.

Darlene Halchuk
Darlene is the Community Coordinator for Special Olympics Burlington who exemplifies leadership and inclusion in the community. She is responsible for the operation of 8 Winter Sports and 5 Summer Sports involving over 200 athletes. During the pandemic Darlene worked hard to ensure our athletes stayed connected with each other and were supported. Darlene works hard to reduce barriers to participation and is always encouraging athletes, coaches and parents to live their best lives.

Ancilla Ho-Young with her certificate

Ancilla Ho-Young
Ancilla worked as a nurse and provided compassionate and non-judgmental care. She is heavily involved in the community on the Halton Equity and Diversity Roundtable, she leads the Burlington Caribbean Connection, was a part of the Burlington Inclusivity Advisory Committee, and is a member of the Board of Community Development Halton and North Burlington Baptist Church. Ancilla has been instrumental in sharing Caribbean culture with our community.

Beverly Jacobs
Beverly has volunteered at the Carpenter Hospice, the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, and the Juravinski Centre. She has spent 30 years as a peer counsellor for breast cancer patients and was also on the board of directors for the Breast Cancer Network of Canada. Beverly also found time to volunteer at Freeman Station and in local and provincial politics.

Bozena Jokel
Bozena is very involved with the Polish National Union of Canada, volunteering her expertise as a CPA to help with accounting, taxes, grant applications, and budgeting. She was instrumental to ensuring that the Polish Centre in Burlington was able to make it through the pandemic, as well as a dedicated leader on the board and hardworking secretary.

Imran Kamal
Imran is an active community volunteer and organizer. He established Hamilton Lawyers Feed the Hungry, volunteers at a Men’s Live-In Addition Treatment Centre, serves on the Mission Services of Hamilton, the AIDS Network, the Burlington Housing Strategy Working Group, and numerous other organizations. Through his work, he is a strong advocate for the LGBTQ2+ community and Indigenous child welfare.

Ed Keenleyside. with Alan Harrington to his right and his wife on his left.

Ed Keenleyside
Ed is a dedicated Burlington community member, giving his time to Scouts Canada, the Royal Botanical Gardens, the Legion, the Bruce Trail Association, the Historical Society, the Friends of Freeman Station, the Burlington Teen Tour Band, and more. He is committed to preserving Burlington’s history and played a role in repairing and recognizing the Burlington Cenotaph on its 100th anniversary.

Mikael Kingo
Mikael is a young leader, actively supporting the hockey community. He raises funds and supports hockey players with new equipment, “Day on the Ice “events with NHL players, scholarships, and mentorship opportunities. He also volunteers at local hospitals and collects donation items for patients. He is a true role model in our community.

Joseph Daniel Lauzon
Dan has proudly served our country with the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions of the Royal Canadian Regiment and also with the Airborne Regiment. He has served in the Gulf War as well as in Somalia. Now retired, he volunteers with the Royal Canadian Legion Brach 60. Dan has held positions as the Colour Guard Commander, the Veteran’s Affairs Officer, and is now the Vice President.

The balance of the recipient are identified in part 2

The room was packed with those being recognized and those who had nominated and family members.

Return to the Front page

Burlington Student Theatre Performing Arts Camp Presents: JEKYLL AND HYDE July 28th - two performances

By Staff

July 23, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Student Theatre Performing Arts Camp Presents: JEKYLL AND HYDE

Music by Frank Wildhorn, Book by Leslie Bricusse

A gripping tale of a brilliant mind gone awry, featuring a thrilling score of pop-rock hits, Jekyll & Hyde is a 1990 musical loosely based on the well-known classic Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson.

The epic struggle between good and evil comes to life on stage in this musical phenomenon. An evocative tale of what appears to be two men – one, a doctor and the other, a madman – with a score that has mesmerized audiences the world over.

This is the occasion to see upfront and personal what the city has in the way of young people who may at some point in their lives become world class performers.

Every actor or actress started somewhere in a small town on a high school stage or on the main stage of the local theatre.  What Burlington has produces can be seen on the 23rd – two performances.

Dates & Times

Thu Jul 28, 2022 at 11am
Thu Jul 28, 2022 at 2:30pm

Venue: Main Theatre

The Main Stage – Burlington Performing Arts Centre

Ticket Prices

Regular: $26 (All-in)
Youth (18 and under): $20 (All-in)

Group of 10 or More (Visit or call the Box Office at 905.681.6000)
Group: $18 (All-in)

Early Bird Pricing (until Jul 19, 2022):
Regular: $23 (All-in)
Youth (18 and under): $18 (All-in)

Return to the Front page

The Model Parks and Recreation is Using to Serve the Seniors needs a re-think - soon.

By Pepper Parr

July 21st, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A heat warning has been issued by Halton Region beginning July 22, 2022.

When a heat warning is issued by Halton Region, residents can stay cool at all open Burlington Public Library branches.

Heat warnings are issued by Halton Region when temperatures are expected to be at least 31°C and overnight temperatures are above 20°C for at least three days or humidex is at least 40 for at least two days.

There are spaces that can be set up for sports that would involve seniors. There are those that would play the game and those that would watch.

We are seeing these media notices on a regular basis.

They look like they are going to be part of the new normal.

Where and who is doing the longer term thinking about how the city is going to meet the needs of the seniors?

This current weather is not going to stop – and this city has seniors who are not able to live decent lives – better to say existences.

Everyone is re-thinking their business model.

The city is no different.

Last year during the heat waves the Aldershot Seniors Group pressed the city to provide cool places where people could meet.  There was some space made available at Central but for just a few hours.

A flood of emails to city councillors brought about the decision to open up the libraries as cooling centers.  That was a good start – but a start is not enough.

There is space that can be used.

The city will say that there is no staff – and there is no staff – but if the city is ready to hire ten additional bylaw enforcement officers – then it had better get ready to hire just as many staff to provide what are really essential’s of life to people who deserve at least that much.

What can the Parks and Recreation people come up with in the way of program ideas?

The public meeting room at the Mainway centre is large enough to set up at least two – maybe three pickle ball courts.

There are a number of groups that would help with putting on some program for younger kids – and for parents.

It is going to take some ingenuity, some creativity and a willingness to look for ways to make it possible for people to have ways to cope with this heat.

This is something we will come back to in the weeks and months ahead.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

Return to the Front page

Arkells are approaching Hamilton Royalty - now part of the Walk of Fame

By Staff

July 20th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Arkells – that band from that city on the other side of the lake has gone and gotten themselves into the Canadian Walk of Fame.

Not enough that they have scooped up five Junos and now this.

This time they are being recognized and given the Allan Slaight Music Impact Honour in recognition of their positive impact on others and contributions to the community.

In no specific order: Max Kerman, Mike DeAngelis, Nick Dika, Tim Oxford and Anthony Carone

Not too shabby for the likes of Max Kerman, Mike DeAngelis, Nick Dika, Tim Oxford and Anthony Carone who have had a banner year since last August’s three once-in-a-return-from-a-pandemic history making nights that reopened the live music business at Toronto’s  Budweiser Stage.

Between the release of their latest chart-topping album, Blink Once and their forthcoming album, Blink Twice, Arkells headlined the 108th Grey Cup Halftime Show in December 2021, performed at the 2022 JUNO Awards (while winning Group of the Year for the 5th time), and made their mark in Hamilton with the return of their hometown summer festival event “The Rally,” of one of the biggest headline shows in the country.

Boys in a box car –

The 2022 edition of “The Rally” concert at Tim Hortons Field broke attendance records at the stadium, with $1 from every ticket sold benefiting Indwell, a local organization that builds and maintains affordable and geared-to-income housing in Hamilton.

“The Rally” has become a highly anticipated and celebrated community event, known to be more than just a concert. This year’s event included a special addition – the opening of the city’s brand new “The Rally Court” – a dazzling refurbished basketball court in Hamilton’s Ward 3 neighbourhood. Replete with brand new vibrant surfacing, glass backboards, bleachers and updated lighting, the court was spearheaded by the band, The City of Hamilton, and funded by Arkells’ friends in the basketball community:  The Nick Nurse Foundation, The Foxcroft Family, Superfan Nav Bhatia, and Canada Basketball.

Throughout the pandemic, many became familiar with Arkells’ “Flatten The Curve” music class, a headline grabbing, free daily music lesson that acted as a reliable outlet for fans all over the world, and helped raise $50,000 for the Food Band of Canada. The FTC Music Class simultaneously bolstered support, both financial and in kind for music programs in Southern Ontario. Their covid relief efforts raised over $15,000 to contribute to virtual programming updates for Hamilton’s YMCA, and their song “All Roads,” served as the soundtrack to #TogetherAgain, a national vaccine awareness PSA to combat vaccine hesitancy during the height of the pandemic.

Randy Lennox speaking for the Canada’s Walk of Fame board of directors said the “Arkells have become one of Canada’s most successful and beloved rock groups.

“When I think of Arkells, I think of unity, community, heart and sheer talent,” said Gary Slaight, President and CEO, The Slaight Family Foundation. ”

They lead with compassion and integrity and epitomize the values that my late father Allan had in mind for this special honour. They are an inspiration and deserving of this recognition.”

Hailed by The Globe and Mail as “the right kind of band for this decade,” Arkells are widely considered one of the most passionate, exuberant and in-demand live bands on the scene today.  As radio mainstays, sports-sync shoe-ins and curious students of culture, Arkells have remained ever present – building awareness and personal community experiences around their live shows and new music at every turn.  Arkells continue to release and tease new music in support of their chart-topping BLINK ONCE & hotly anticipated BLINK TWICE companion albums, while touring internationally.

Links:

@arkellsmusic
@CWOFame
web site: http://www.arkellsmusic.com/

Return to the Front page

City View Park is now officially open - well worth a visit

By Pepper Parr

July 17th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

With more than $1 million in city hall talent on site to officially open the new pavilion at City View Park, the ribbon was cut officially unveiling the new public art piece titled, ‘SOAR’. Mayor Meed Ward, Ward 1 Councillor Kelvin Galbraith, project partners and City staff helped cut the ribbon to the building and unveil the public art.

The pavilion is open for community use and all are welcome.

The entrance to the park is off Kerns Road

It was a Friday afternoon, lovely weather and a chance to get out of the office. Just how many actually work in city hall is an unasked question. Not a mask in sight.  L-R Angela Paparizo, Rich Trella, Scott Virgin, Chris Glenn, City Manager Tim Commisso, Ward 1 Councillor Kelvin Galbraith, Graham McNally, Patrick Tucker, Mayor Marianne Meed Ward, Paula Hamilton, Jennifer Johnson, Paul Swioklo, Wynn McDonald, Allan Magi.

City View Park Pavilion
The pavilion is designed to be environmentally friendly and features public washrooms, community space, covered terrace, a water refill station and seating.

It is a key feature for Bruce Trail hikers to meet or continue their adventure and a significant milestone towards the completion of the City View Park Master Plan.

The City View Park Pavilion is exceptionally well fitted out. This should become a much sought venue for events.

• The design of the building features sustainability, water and energy efficiencies and is a symbolic connection between new construction and the unique natural setting of the escarpment.
• Green building measures have been incorporated using a wood structure, an onsite well filtered for drinking water and onsite sewerage disposal system.
• The building does not use any fossil fuels in its operation. By using solar power, the building will achieve net-carbon neutrality: the roof-top solar panels produce the electricity the building uses.
It also has:
• Public washrooms;
• A community room open for casual use and organized sport tournaments;
• Indoor public gathering area that can be used by all park users;
• Exterior space with an outdoor, covered terrace;
• Accessible parking and drop-off area;
• Interpretive displays highlighting the unique park setting on a large display screen and two smaller information screens;
• Public art, SOAR, by artist Hooman Mehdizadehjafari.

Sheltered area – public washrooms are part of the structure.

When first opened the Park was exclusive to soccer players taking part in the Pan Am Games.  Two of the soccer fields had artificial turf – which was controversial at the time and probably would not have been installed if the decision were to be made today.

It is a very large park – closer to Hamiltonian’s than most Burlingtonians

The 17-foot-tall metal sculpture, created by artist Hooman Mehdizadehjafari, reflects the rich natural heritage of the region, in particular the Niagara Escarpment.

About the public art, SOAR
The 17-foot-tall metal sculpture, created by artist Hooman Mehdizadehjafari, reflects the rich natural heritage of the region, in particular the Niagara Escarpment. From the life-giving and mighty Niagara Falls, the iconic flora and fauna that gives special identity to the ecosystem of the region such as the Calypso Orchid, Southern Flying Squirrel, and Spotted Turtle, to the cedar forests and their immense, interconnected, underground root system.

The diversity of materials used creates a beautiful play of colours that can often be seen in nature and alludes to the diverse and united community of Burlington.

Somehow the people got in the way of the sculpture – hard to tell just what it looks like Mayor took up most of the photo op space.  L – R Allan Magi, Chris Glenn, Ward 1 Councillor Kelvin Galbraith, Mayor Marianne Meed Ward, Angela Paparizo, Jennifer Johnson

‘SOAR’ is a reflective mirror of the rich natural heritage of the site and celebrates the gracious and honourable ambition of appreciating and protecting the environment and ensuring its passing on to future generations.

The applied words THROUGH – NATURE – WITH – LOVE – WE – THRIVE in ‘SOAR’, create an infinite circulation that reflects the ultimate message of the artwork: by loving our nature, valuing and protecting it, we may grow and thrive within it peacefully.

Return to the Front page