Burlington photographer's work part of a juried exhibition

By Staff

May 10th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Frank Meyers took to photography a number of years ago. He happened to have a good eye and taught himself how to fram what he was looking through his view finder. There were some surprising results.

This year he decided he would enter some of his work in major exhibitions. Frank had grown beyond the Burlington market

He has four prints in the Forms, Faces and Spaces juried exhibition. It’s an official venue of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

A production of Studio by Design, the show is located in the parish hall, 16 Adamson St. S., Norval, Ontario.

Hours are Thursday to Sunday from noon to 4:30pm until May 29.

If you’re looking for one of those nice drives in the country – this will be one of them.

Part of a juried juried exhibition. It’s an official venue of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

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The Port Nelson Park is going to get an upgrade - and the Green Street Window on the Lake will get the attention it needs

By Pepper Parr

May 10th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Progress!

We wrote about the Windows on the Lake last week as the result of an inquiry from an area resident.

Link to that story is HERE.

Ward 2 Councillor Lisa Kearns dropped us a note bringing us up to date.

From the Councillor to a resident:

Thank you for reaching out to the City to inquire about the status of the Green Street Window-to-the-Lake. The City is in the process of awarding the shoreline construction contract for execution this summer. This contract includes the rehabilitation of both the water’s edge at Green Street and Port Nelson Park. Work is anticipated to start in early July. As you can appreciate, the shoreline must be complete to provide stable conditions for park/window development. Construction of each park will follow in 2023.

A saw mill operated at the Port Area. Burlington used to ship tonnes of lumber to Europe. Some may have arrived at the Port as logs that were cut and loaded aboard what would have been sailing ships.

Something has always struck me about the waterfront and that area between St. Paul and Port Nelson Park a spot that was once the location of the largest port for what is now Burlington.

When I look at the property and the drop to the water level I can’t figure out just where the wharf or jetty would have been.

Anyone out there that knows? Might make some time to mosey along to the Historical Society and look through their archives.

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Impact of COVID19 on 131,624 Halton caregivers: what were the lessons learned? Not very many

By Staff

May 9th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Part 2: Caregivers.

This Community Lens, the second in a two-part series on caregiving, will draw from the findings of a 2021 survey on the impacts of COVID-19 on caregivers.

The survey was carried out by the Ontario Caregiver Organization (OCO) deep into the second year of the pandemic, between September 24th and October 12th, 2021.

Released in November 2021, entitled, ‘Spotlight Report, The Impact of COVID-19 on Caregivers: Year Two’ , it is the second pandemic caregiver survey undertaken by the organization. Its first pandemic survey, ‘Spotlight on Ontario’s Caregivers COVID-19 Edition’, was released in December 2020.

Former Burlington MPP Eleanor McMahon speaking with seniors at a meeting in the Library.

The OCO defines caregivers as “ordinary people who provide physical and/or emotional support to a family member, partner, friend, or neighbour”. Funded by the Government of Ontario, the OCO is a nonprofit that was created in 2018 “to support Ontario’s estimated 3.3 million caregivers”.

In publishing this Community Lens, CDH intends to raise awareness of the experiences of caregivers, in our view, an increasingly important, but often overlooked, area of life for many people and families across Halton.

COVID-19 Impacts on Caregivers
Since the OCO’s first pandemic survey in December 2020, the findings from the 2021 survey indicate that many of the negative and difficult personal caregiver experiences deteriorated further. There were 801 “self-reported caregivers” aged 16 years and older who participated in the online survey between September 24 and October 12, 2021. As part of its research, the OCO also conducted a series of ten in- depth interviews alongside the online survey.

In the second year of the pandemic, caregivers reported increases in “feeling tired, anxious, overwhelmed, trapped, frustrated and unappreciated”. In fact, according to the 2021 survey findings, caregiver burnout was at record high levels.

While one in three caregivers in the 2021 survey reported that they had “no one to ask for help” if they needed a rest or if they became sick.

The climate of heightened anxiety around COVID-19 transmission, among other factors, impacted caregivers and care recipients, with 56% of caregivers reported worrying about “managing care recipient’s anxiety due to Covid-19”.
COVID-19 caused significant service and care support disruptions, which would have been felt disproportionately by caregivers who were already overstretched, such as those with smaller family and friend networks.

Mary Alice St. James talking to seniors during an election campaign.

The increased pressure on the healthcare system during the pandemic impacted 75% of caregivers who were required to take on “responsibilities that would otherwise go to a personal support worker or nurse”. Overall, caregivers reported that more time was spent caregiving during the pandemic, “61% say the hours they spend providing care has increased”. According to the 2021 survey, almost one in five carers (18%) were “caring for more than one person”. The pandemic not only created additional complexity for that group, but for many caregivers, 59% of whom said their responsibilities were more difficult in 2021 “than before the pandemic”.

The top three reasons that caregivers gave were:

“Being at home all the time, the care recipient is unable to get important social interaction (38%) Difficulty accessing the doctors and/or other healthcare professionals (36%)

Delayed/cancelled appointments require more time and effort in rescheduling (33%)”.

Enhanced health and safety protocols in hospitals and long-term care facilities, introduced to keep the most vulnerable safe from COVID-19 transmission, were nonetheless difficult experiences for many caregivers and recipients, particularly those that were already isolated and lonely pre-pandemic. Due to enhanced COVID-19 health and safety rules, “26% [of caregivers in the 2021 survey] had to send the care recipient to the hospital alone”.

Canadian caregivers also reported worse personal pandemic impacts than their global counterparts. A survey by Embracing Carers, released in 2021, found that, “70% of Canadian carers say that the pandemic has worsened their emotional/mental health, compared to 61% of the 12-country average” and “61% of Canadian carers say that the pandemic has worsened their physical health, compared to 46% of the 12- country average”.

Burlington has a very strong network of seniors who have clout that spreads throughout the Region of Halton. This crowd was focused on transit while the MP, Karina Gould and then ward 2 Councillor, now Mayor Burlington, Marianne Meed Ward look on.

Post-Covid Financial Pressures: Rising Living Costs to Impact Caregivers
Financial hardship exists among caregivers, just as it is experienced by individuals and families across our communities. The OCO 2021 survey reported that, “20% of caregivers took out a loan or a line of credit to help pay for the expense [of caregiving], up from 17%” in the 2020 survey. 9 It found that 45% “experienced financial hardships [in 2021], compared to 41% in 2020”, an increase of 4% during the two pandemic surveys. Perhaps a more concerning trend was that the 45% of caregivers experiencing financial hardship in 2021 was up 13% (from 32% in 2019). Moreover, the 2021 level of self-reported financial hardship (45%) is more than double the 22% reported in the 2018 survey.

The current rise in living costs being witnessed across the country will only serve to increase the financial hardship of many caregivers. In “January 2022, Canadian inflation surpassed 5% for the first time since September 1991”. 10 In February 2022, national average prices climbed further. Canada’s inflation level for February 2022 sat at 5.7% (12-month average, compared with February 2021).

Staple food items are increasing faster than the 5.7% inflation level. In February 2022 (compared with February 2021), fresh or frozen beef prices were up 16.8%, chicken was up 10.4%, and “dairy products and eggs were up 6.9%”.  These macro economic price trends support the personal reflections of caregivers in the OCO 2021 survey: 47% of whom said that “there have been more costs related to providing care” during COVID-19.

Councillor Sharman has held two public sessions with Senior’s as part of his effort to understand their needs and develop policy that Council can put in place to serve this vital community.

Caregivers fortunate enough to have access to a motor vehicle are experiencing much higher price increases than the 5.7% inflation level. In February 2022, Canadians “paid 32.3% more at the pump compared with February 2021”. 14 Such fuel price increases are likely to put caregivers under increasing financial pressure, disproportionality impacting more rural and isolated caregivers and those with inadequate access to public transport. The associated tasks around providing caregiver support, some of which are heavily reliant on transport, such as attending doctors’ appointments, prescription runs, buying medical and care supplies, are now more expensive post-Covid.

Conclusion
This Community Lens showed that the negative experiences of caregiving during COVID-19 were exacerbated by a pandemic that affected service provisions, contributed to increased anxiety and burnout, impeded crucial social interactions, and increased financial pressures on caregivers.

Unfortunately, the post-COVID economic climate is unlikely to offer much respite for struggling caregivers in the months ahead. Gas and essential food item prices are fast outpacing Canada’s 31-year inflation high of 5.7%, which was announced for February 2022. 15 These post-COVID price increases, caused in part by higher “input prices and heightened transportation costs,” come on top of already increased costs that were associated with caregiving, as reported in the 2021 OCO survey.

If there is to be a positive takeaway from the pandemic it may be, as the CEO and board chair of the OCO put it in their opening remarks to the 2021 survey, “the expanded understanding of what caregivers do and why they are essential partners in care”. We hope this Community Lens series has contributed, in a small way, to this understanding, and helps shine a light on the role that an “estimated 131,624 Halton caregivers” play in supporting families, friends, and the wider healthcare and social system.

Further Resources for Caregivers
If you are a caregiver, or know someone who is, and would like further information around resources and support, we recommend visiting the Ontario Caregiver Organization website:    https://ontariocaregiver.ca

As always, if you have any feedback about this Community Lens or about any of our other social policy and planning work, please reach out to data@cdhalton.ca

Community Lens is prepared by Community Development Halton to disseminate and interpret important community data as it becomes available. For more information please contact us at data@cdhalton.ca or 905-632-1975

Community Development Halton 3350 South Service Road
Burlington, ON L7N 3M6
905-632-1975 www.cdhalton.ca

Caregivers:  Part 1

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Jim Thompson ask some pretty direct questions: How did the LPMA manage to spend a reported $97,000 on legal costs.

By Pepper Parr

May 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Today is the kind of day the boaters would have been out washing down the decks of their boats and preparing for the launch.  Will there be a launch this year – not something anyone can be really certain about.

The LaSalle Park Marina with a rendering of the wave break in place.

Jim Thomson delegated before a Standing Committee and gave Councillors some background on the problems with insurance coverage for the LaSalle Park Marina.

Jim Thomson – asks a lot of questions

Thomson is not a boater, he is not a member of any of the associated clubs.

His only involvement with the marina was a complaint he made back in 2016 when he had a complaint about smells coming from the docks which in those days were hauled out of the water every year.  The shellfish had accumulated – he called the city – got nothing and decided to call the health department – guess what – the city responded.

Jim was just as  direct with Council. Thomson knew that the law suit that was impacting the renewal of an insurance policy was something the city knew about the day the claim was made – the city was originally a party to the claim.

Somehow the city got themselves removed from the claim but that doesn’t detract from the fact that they knew..

Slip and falls tend to be in the $10,000 to $40,000 range – how do you spend $97,000 on legal fees and still not have a settlement?

Thomson believes that the claim – a slip and fall event, has eaten up $97,000 in legal fees.

The only people who know who filed the claim is the LPMA Board and of course city hall.

Thomson said that slip and fall claims tend to be between $10,000 and $40,000 with few being at the high end.

The slip and fall claim was served early in 2019 – the most recent operating agreement with the city was signed later in the year.

Thomson wonders was the matter of the insurance was not brought up at that time – where is the proper due diligence Thomson asks.

If the city was able to get itself off the claim that would suggest the accident took place on one of the links between the rows of boat slips.

Is this a pace city hall can work at?

A lot of questions – not many answers at this point.

City manager Tim Commisso – commenting during the Marina delegations.

Thomson has an interview being set up with City Manager Tim Commisso – no date yet.  It will be a telephone interview; tough to present an argument that way.

Thomson had an issue with an item being on the agenda with no report that people could read before taking part in the meeting.  Burlington is at a point in its pandemic evolution where people can delegate in person.  Thomson was very much in person.

He told Council it needed to “act instantly or boaters will lose their season.

He told Council that “Staff doesn’t know what’s to be done” and that “Staff has no idea of the problems”.

Thomson also said:  It’s hard to delegate on a report that arrives late on the agenda adding that “a verbal update” doesn’t leave any room for community comment at the committee stage.

Where, Thomson wanted to know is where was ” the transparency we’ve all been hearing so much

Thomson filled in some of the information holes:

LPMA Claims history has caused current insurer to cancel.

Rick Craven, a former ward 1 Councillor identified two outstanding claims as slip-and-fall lawsuits.

Are there other claims that have been settled? Has the City reviewed the claims history?

Is this where the slip and fall took place?

Are the docks un-safe?

Do they need modification to reduce slips/falls?

Thomson quoting the the Burlington Boating and Sailing Club Commodore Scott Lowell: “It is now imperative that the City of Burlington assume direct management of what in the end is their marina (they own the wave- break and the docks) and move quickly to open the marina,”

Thomson doesn’t buy the imperative argument. “There is significant cost to the city running the marina; Not something the City should be rushing into

He added that the the City is in possession of a report on running the marina that would result in an  operating loss of $196,750 for the year 2022

The data in the 2019 report assumed the city would already have been operating the marina for two years. It also assumed that the city would have about 9 month to plan the take-over.

Thomson left City Council with these thoughts”

Is all the data, background information and history coming together to form a perfect storm?

The lease on LaSalle Park is up at the end of the year.

What happens next year?

The City needs a Master Plan for LaSalle

If the City wants a Marina do it right

Council and staff need to stop improvising

A lot more to come on this file.

Stay tuned.

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Are the politicians muddying the Marina insurance problem?

By Pepper Parr

May 7th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Social media is one of the communication channels that gets a bad wrap.

The politicians will complain loud and publicly that social media is misused and abused and then do just that – exploit what can be done with Twitter and a Facebook account.

These boats will stay where they are until the 17th – while the city scrambles to find a way to put insurance coverage in place.

Former American president Donald Trump was an artist with the way he manipulated messages and created a following of millions until he was banned from Twitter.

Last week the city was presented with a really messy situation at the LaSalle Park Marina. Boats could not be put into the water because required insurance could not be put in place.

Burlington’s Mayor is heavily invested in the marina issue. She chose to support the installation of a needed wave break and convinced the rest of council to go along with pulling $4 million out of the Hydro Reserve Fund to pay for the wave break.

The insurance problem was something someone should have been on top of – but that is spilled milk

The boaters need a fast response which may not be something the city bureaucracy can deliver – municipal government just doesn’t work that way.

Mayor Meed Ward put out a note on social media saying:

 

 

Ward 1 Councillor Kelvin Galbraith needs all the help he can get in his re-election bid. The Mayor will support him – returning the favours he has done for her.

That Tweet didn’t quite square with the recommendation that was debated at Council.  Someone at city hall has put out a more moderate message.

A more moderate message was posted about an hour later.

What the public doesn’t need is politicians exploiting a serious problem.

Director of Parks Recreation and Culture Chris Glenn did a good job of managing the issue during the debate.

Staff from Legal set out what the insurance problem is and what will have to be done to get insurance coverage in place.

There is a very real chance that the boaters may lose their boating season.

There are reports that some members of the LPMA have pulled out and are looking for a place to locate their boat.  The problem with that is – there isn’t that much capacity in the immediate area.

There are a lot of view points out there.

 

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Marina will not open as planned - new date cannot be set until insurance issues are resolved.

By Staff

May 6th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is an unfortunate situation that could have and should have been looked into some time ago.

City Council and senior staff are working diligently to solve the problem – some comments and background at a later date.

LaSalle Park – these boats might be stuck on the site for some time.

The boat launch which was to take place on the 15th is now delayed – a new date has yet to be determined.

The delay is due to insurance renewal issues. The City is aware of the LaSalle Park Marina Association’s (LPMA) expired liability insurance and difficulties finding a replacement insurer. The City is working closely with the LPMA to find a short-term and a long-term solution to open the marina.

At the May 5 Environment, Infrastructure and Community Services Committee meeting, City Council gave a staff direction which includes doing due diligence to identify and fully address the financial, legal, human resource and operating risk exposures to the City in order to operate the LaSalle Park Community Marina on an interim basis for the 2022 season based on a target date for opening of no later than June 15.

A key component is the interim Marina operation must be at no cost to the taxpayers of Burlington inclusive of City reserve funds. Early in this term of Council they approved taking $4 million out of the hydro reserve fund to pay for the wave break that was desperately needed.

City staff will report back to City Council on May 17, 2022 and at the June 9, 2022 Environment, Infrastructure and Community Services Committee.

The community marina is a key feature that the City values and wants to keep open, as is evident by the $4 million investment in the floating wave break that was installed in 2020. Proper insurance is required for operation and options are being explored. The closure of the marina also means the Burlington Sailing and Boating Club and the Able Sail program cannot operate from the marina and the boat launch will remain closed.

About the LaSalle Park Community Marina
Through an agreement with the City, the marina has been has operated by the LPMA for 41 years. The City owns the wave break and the marina.

The wave break is in place – now insurance issues will keep the boats out of the water.

The Marina is in a decent location.  Parking is an issue and the site could use a decent restaurant. Marina has 219 docking spaces and is protected by a new floating wave break that was installed in 2020.

The Burlington Sailing and Boating Club and the Able Sail program offer sailing programs at the Marina. In addition, the City has a public boat launch at the Marina that is protected by the floating wave break.

Without a solution the marina will not be able to open. As it is many of the boaters will want to look for a new location – and there aren’t many of them in the immediate area.

This could end up being a black day for a lot of people.

Chris Glenn: Director of Parks and Recreation and Culture.

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture said during the Standing Committee earlier this week that: “The City of Burlington is committed to working with the LPMA to find a short-term and a long-term solution to keep the marina open for residents and tourists. We know the marina is a key feature for many people. We are exploring multiple options to get it open for the 2022 boating season and beyond. Until a solution is found, the marina and boat launch will remain closed and further update will be shared with the public as available.”

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City to receive $1 million plus donation for park improvements

By Staff

May 6th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington is about to receive a very generous donation in the way of funding for  us recreation and park infrastructure amenities that will be managed by the Parks and Recreation department.

The gift to the city is from the  Patrick J McNally Foundation,.

The McNally Foundation contributed to the development of this parkette.

The City of Burlington and the Patrick J McNally Foundation  have worked together  in recent years  and have partnered on the design and construction of various recreational facilities throughout the City.

In 2018, the Foundation funded a water service and splash pad for Bolus Park as part of the KABOOM! community project. They also financed a new water service for the Francis Road community garden.

Most recently the Foundation financed the reconstruction of Valley Inn pedestrian bridge and 100 sheets of artificial ice. Both contributions support year-round outdoor recreational opportunities. The artificial ice provided a much-needed outdoor activity during the pandemic.

The Foundation has now committed to donating $1.125 million over 2022 and 2023 for the design and construction of new park amenities.

2022 Projects
Central Park

$150,000 Accessible multi-user swing This multi-user swing will accommodate mobility devices and up to four people at once. No wheelchair transfer will be required. This will be the first in Ontario.

Sweetgrass Park
$60,000 Medicine Wheel/Healing Garden To coincide with the renaming of the park, work will include a park identification sign and interpretive signage. Details and scope of this project will be determined in consultation with the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation.

Leighland Park
$450,000 Ball hockey/basketball combination court
Fitness equipment loop
Shade structure w/picnic tables

The park amenities included here will be added to the larger park renewal project that is currently underway.

All these additions are requests from the public but could not be accommodated within the park capital program.

2023 Projects
Lansdown Park
$400,000 Splash pad
New water service This splash pad will be a new feature to the park and designed/constructed as part of the larger park renewal.

Port Nelson Park

Port Nelson Park
$65,000 New water service
Drinking fountain with bottle filler This feature will support this lake-side park and users of the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail, supporting active transportation.

 

The Foundation’s wanted to have the work done within the next 6 to 15 months. Current staff workload and the risk of building new park amenities without associated operating budget, the approach for the current funding is to enhance already active park revitalization projects. The new park amenities will have a positive community impact and associated operating budget can be captured in the 2023 budget process.

Staff considered other parks and needs in the community but given timing and existing workloads, it was decided to focus efforts on park projects currently underway to have most opportunity for success.

Staff also considered the option to not accept the donation. However, with a willing donor and strong community interest in parks and park amenities, staff felt it was important to pursue this opportunity.

Total donation to the City is:

• $660,000 in 2022
• $465,000 in 2023

Except for the proposed work at Sweetgrass Park, all of the proposed donations will be included in the larger capital revitalization projects currently underway.

Human Resources
Additional staffing is required to operate and maintain these amenities; particularly, the expansion of assets at Leighland Park. This work will require two seasonal staff, one temp and one student, which amounts to $46,500.

Utilities
The $30,000 listed for utilities is specifically related to the splash pad at Lansdown Park to cover this service.

Labour/Materials/Purchased Services
With new assets being installed, additional costs to maintain these items through the year are required. This includes work such as required inspections, litter/debris pickup, infrastructure repairs, keeping surfaces clean/safe, grass cutting/trimming and regular annual seasonal-specific maintenance.

Source of Funding
These estimated operating impacts will be phased in over the 2023 and 2024 budgets as the associated assets are slated to be completed. The City’s multi-year budget simulation will be updated to reflect these estimated impacts.

So who was Patrick McNally and where did the money come from? That is a separate and remarkable story that you can read HERE

 

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Freeman schedule

By Staff

May 6th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

With life getting back to normal you will want to know what is open and what the hours are.

The Freeman Station on Fairview has become a go to place, especially for parents with children who want to take them to places that are fun.

The display in the basement of the building, called a diorama, tells the story and the roll rail played in the city’s growth.

Parents will learn even more than the kids.

Related articles:
The model set up in the basement of Freeman Station

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STOP the SPRAWL: the growth taking place and what is in the works adds to the climate emergency

By Staff

May 5th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The provincial election that began officially yesterday is about climate change.

Your life and the quality of the life you live in the next three to five years is going to be decided on who you elect on June 2nd.

Stop the Sprawl a group working across the province is doing there best to set out the issues and give you a chance to take part in this vital exercise.   Send them your thoughts: Stop Sprawl Halton – stopsprawlhalton@gmail.com

On April 14th 2022, Bill 109, the More Homes for Everyone Act hurriedly received royal assent a scant two weeks after it was introduced. Bill 109 formalized a provision that would allow the Minister to refer Official Plan Amendments to the Ontario Land Tribunal (OLT) if the Minister is not satisfied with the submission.

Beausoleil, the structure on the left in this rendering was approved at the Ontario Land Tribunal level – city council was not in love with this one.

This is an unacceptable shift from the long-standing process whereby provincial and municipal planning staff work collaboratively to achieve consensus on Official Plan submissions. Simply pitching submissions to an arbitrator that allows a single individual the authority to accept or deny Official Plans converts municipal planning to an adversarial process that will unnecessarily cost municipal taxpayers millions of dollars.
Official Plans and local autonomy threatened

In November 2021, Hamilton City Council voted to accommodate all expected future growth within its current urban boundaries, rather than sprawling outward onto precious farmland, woods and wetlands because the mandated market-driven housing mix CAN be accommodated.

It is unacceptable, therefore, that Ontario Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing Steve Clark stated in the legislature that Hamilton’s refusal to expand its urban boundaries was unacceptable to the Ford government, and that he was considering referral of the matter to the Ontario Land Tribunal (OLT) for a decision. Hamilton’s approved plan was in compliance with all provincial policies.

In February 2022, Halton Regional Council also directed their staff to prepare an Official Plan with no urban expansion for the next 20 years, recognizing they have enough vacant land within the current urban boundary to accommodate all mandated growth to 2041. Halton also elected to delay approving its plan for accommodating growth to 2051 until the province reveals its response to the Affordable Housing Task Force Report. Halton fully intends to be compliant with Provincial legislation once the new rules are known.

Many other municipal councils are still completing their Official Plans. Will their deliberations be subject to the Minister’s whims too?

Referral to the OLT: double jeopardy for Councils and taxpayers

The problem in the Region of Halton is the same problem Hamilton is fighting.

The threat of referral to the OLT, with its significant price tag, will surely influence decision- making as councils struggle with the cost of a potential OLT court case. Councils understand that there is always the threat of going to the OLT to defend their decisions from challenges from land speculators. But they should not have the province also threatening the same challenge. What, in effect has happened is that the challenges expected from speculators will now be paid for by the people of Ontario via the Province’s intervention.

It is an affront to democracy to reject the planning decisions made by elected councils, when they have followed provincial legislation and made their decisions following due process, consistent with local priorities.

Ontario’s Stop Sprawl Coalition calls on the Province of Ontario to repeal sections of Bill 109 that deal with referrals to the OLT.

We have a climate emergency: plan for it!

The climate has changed – the sudden floods in 2014 caused this flooding in Burlington

Ontario’s Stop Sprawl Coalition supports:

• Ending exclusionary zoning to allow for gentle density in existing neighbourhoods
• Growth through sustainable, more efficient use of land
• Ending sprawl as a means of accommodating new population
• Designing complete, walkable, transit-supportive mixed-use communities
• Saving farming, not just farmland
• Rethinking employment areas for efficiency of land use
• Protection of natural assets, including watersheds, water sources, sensitive lands and biodiversity
• Broad community consultation including Indigenous voices

The Places to Grow Act (PGA) was introduced in the Province of Ontario in 2005. This provincial legislation provided new guidance for how municipalities accommodate growth. It was introduced specifically to address the alarming loss of prime agricultural farmland in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) and the negative consequences of sprawl such as increased commute times, traffic congestion on provincial highways, loss of productivity, increased greenhouse gas emissions and the unsustainable increasing costs to the taxpayers for servicing sprawling growth.

The PGA for the first time forced all municipalities in the GGH to reduce their reliance on converting farmland to subdivisions and introduced mandatory intensification targets within built- up areas of the communities.

The Ford government updated the legislation in 2019 by walking back the intensification targets and by introducing a goal that would effectively require municipalities to approve more sprawl to accommodate growth. The key new requirement was to accommodate the future market for single family dwellings.

Since late last year, Stop Sprawl organizations have sprung up across the GGH in response to these changes which move the province in a backward direction. Municipalities have other priorities that will be thwarted if they simply comply by approving sprawl.

How we must grow during climate breakdown

The Green space we have left. In Burlington the Escarpment is protected – will a second term PC government keep that protection in place.

Ontario’s remaining green spaces are precious. They mitigate climate change and provide future food security. We applaud municipal councils that have chosen to accommodate growth within their existing urban areas and are diligently working on policies that will increase the supply of single-family dwellings without an urban expansion. They have chosen to grow by focusing intensification along higher order transit corridors and in commercial nodes. They have chosen to provide more opportunities for affordable housing to be built near services. They have chosen to plan for growing vibrant walkable, less car-dependent neighbourhoods. They have chosen to grow in a more financially viable way in contrast to accepting the escalating cost of growth through continuing expansion of their urban boundaries.

Stop Sprawl Ontario supports sustainable growth that integrates responsible land management , more efficient use of land, and focuses on creating walkable, livable, healthy communities for all residents in harmony with nature.

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Bingo returns - games will take place at the Polish Hall

By Pepper Parr

May 4th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Things are definitely getting back to normal.

Bingo is coming back.

The games will be played at the Polish Hall.

Polish Hall – new home for regular bingo games

It took city council hours of listening to deletions from two bingo game operators, who both wanted the Burlington market, which was described as prime by one of the bingo game operators.

When there is more time to write we will explain the complexities of bingo game operations – which are charity based.

A bingo operator must have sponsors from the charitable sector.

How much do they charities get – they get 45% of the proceeds.

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Mountainside is going to get some public art to brighten up the pool. The facility has undergone significant upgrades - a long time dream of former Councillor John Taylor

By Staff

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Community members needed to join the Mountainside Pool Revitalization Public Art Steering Committee

The city’s public art program is looking for community members to join the Steering Committee for the Mountainside Pool Revitalization Project public art mural.

Rendering of what the pool and the shade area would look like

The Steering Committee will provide input into project goals and themes, create a shortlist from the applicants and the winning artist.

The public art program is commissioning a professional artist to paint a mural as part of this project. This revitalization will create a new attractive, fun and welcoming multi-use outdoor swimming pool. The goal is to revitalize the Mountainside Pool so it is inviting and encourages participation through swimming and water play while fostering an active and healthy lifestyle.

Three artists will be shortlisted to create preliminary design concepts for the public review and comment. The community Steering Committee will evaluate the public feedback plus the technical proposal to select the winning artist.

The pool is heavily used.

Steering Committee Roles & Responsibilities
• Attend a project start-up meeting (online) to brainstorm project goals and themes
• Review and score artist proposals to select a shortlist of three artists
• Review design proposals and public feedback of three short-listed artists to select winning artist
• All scoring can be done remotely using an online submission system. Jury meetings will be held via videoconference

Honorarium
Steering Committee members will be given an honorarium of $200 as a token of appreciation for their time commitment and participation in the project.

Time Commitment
• Three meetings via videoconference
o Project Start-up: one hour
o Select Shortlist: two hours
o Select Winning Proposal: two hours
• Review and score artist submissions: this task can be done remotely using an online review system (approximately five hours)

Project Timeline
Deadline Activity

May/June 2022 Meeting #1: project start-up meeting (videoconference)
September 2022 Review and score artist proposals (online)
October 2022 Meeting #2: Select shortlist (videoconference)
January 2023 Public consultation
February 2023 Review and score shortlisted design proposals and public feedback (online)
March 2023 Meeting #3: Select winning artist (videoconference)
May/June 2023 Artwork installation and unveiling

Some art work would certainly help this entrance

How to Apply

Interested applicants should send:

1. Their name
2. Contact Information
1. address
2. phone
3. email
3. And a brief statement outlining why they are interested in joining the Steering Committee (250 words maximum)

Applications should be submitted to Kim Selman at kim@cobaltconnects.ca or at burlingtonpublicart.com/get-involved/jury-roster/ before Friday, May 6.

For more information, please visit www.burlington.ca/publicart.

Councillor Sharman speaking to Angela Paparazzo

Angela Paparizo, Manager of Arts and Culture explains what this initiative is all about.

“Not only is this a great opportunity for an artist to design and create a beautiful mural for the revitalized Mountainside Pool, it is also an exciting opportunity for residents to join the steering committee to help us select the right artist for this project. I welcome anyone who is thinking about applying to contact us with any questions.

Residents are encouraged to submit their applications before May 6. It is my hope that Burlington residents will get involved in this opportunity to choose an artist and evaluate the mural submissions for Mountainside.”

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Ontario Parks is expanding the Advanced Daily Vehicle Permit Service

By Staff

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

While we think Burlington has everything one could ever want in terms of places to go to get out and get some fresh air – there are parks scattered about the province that would love to see you.

Setting up the tent – now you know you are camping.

Advance day use reservations will be available at 33 parks this summer.  The booking service will allow visitors to guarantee a day-use spot up to 5 days ahead of their trip. Permits can be obtained online using the reservation service.

Paddling across the still water of a large lake – pure Ontario

Building on last year’s offering at 17 provincial parks, visitors will be able to reserve day use permits at an additional 16 provincial parks starting on May 16 for arrivals on May 20.

Ontario Park visitors loved this service last year. Expanding it to additional parks now gives visitors even more opportunities to book a stress-free visit to a provincial park and spend more time in nature.

 

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Ukraine needs our help now; take part in a fund raising event on May 14th.

By Staff

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

One Burlington, the group that celebrates faith, culture and embraces diversity. is hosting a fund raising concert for Ukraine

The event will take place at St. Christopher’s Anglican Church on Saturday, May 14, 2022 – 2:00 pm

The funds raised will go to the Canada Ukraine Foundation.

Members of the Ukrainian community filled Civic Square awhile ago – things in their country have not gotten any better. Continued support is badly needed.

A suggested donation of $20 per person would be appreciated. For those who might want to donate in advance the CU Foundation website  A tax-receipt will be issued.

Several professional artists are donating their talents for this important cause.

Charles Cozens  has more than 150 CD’s in circulation.

Jeff Madden, tenor, will be performing uplifting material from the American musical theatre songbook. Mr. Madden starred as Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys and Kevin in the ensemble cast of Come From Away.

Charles Cozens and Colin Maier are the duo, JoyRide.

Cozens is a renown accordionist, Maier plays numerous instruments in this dynamic duo.

Andrea Battista is a violinist with the Burlington Symphony Orchestra and Chair of the Burlington Arts and Culture Council of Burlington. She will accompany Jeff Madden and entertain us with a solo performance on the piano.

There are several performances by local groups as well

GuZheng Group presents young people on the Chinese Zither, a harpsichord-like instrument. Dressed in traditional costumes, this ensemble is amazing to watch.

Several Ukrainian churches have pulled together a choir to perform. .

A Bandura duo will perform on this traditional Ukrainian lute-like instrument. The closing act will be a presentation by the young company of the Tyrsa Ukrainian Dancers.

Tyrsa Ukrainian Dancers.

Fabulously dressed in embroidered shirts, bright red skirts and pants and ribboned caps, these young people will raise spirits and smiles as well as funds!

One Burlington is organizing this event in co-operation with the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Holy Protection of the Mother of God.

One Burlington has been presenting events since 2017. It is dedicated to bringing people together to learn more about each other to create understanding and acceptance.  Their website is at  oneburlington.net

There is a desperate situation in Ukraine – they need our help now – be as generous as you can.

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Freeman Station, closed during the pandemic has re-opened - lots of painting and upgrading done to the station

By DENIS GIBBONS

May 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Freeman Station, Burlington’s historical gem, was celebrated Saturday at a Grand Reopening following a lengthy restoration by volunteers with the help of an Ontario Trillium Foundation grant, resulting in a sparkling new edifice.

New panels were installed, as well as new flooring, painting was done, the ceiling restored and the original windows, including the distinctive Jane Irwin oval window at the end of the room, reconstructed.

Ed Keenleyside, president of the Friends of Freeman Station,

Ed Keenleyside, president of the Friends of Freeman Station, said the Grand Trunk Railway Station is 100 per cent operated by volunteers. He outlined a three-way, five-year legal agreement which has made the project possible.

“Solenis Chemicals (an adjacent plant) has been very good to allow us to use this land,” he said. “The building is owned by the City and all artifacts by the Friends of Freeman Station.”

The wooden station, named after Freeman village founder Joshua Freeman, was originally located on the CN rail line near the corner of Brant Street and Plains Road. In 2005, it was moved, in order to save it from demolition, when a third track was installed.

Lifted off the blocks it had perched on for a couple of years the station got hoisted by a crane and lowered into it new home that had a full basement.

It’s the only building in the city whose historical and architectural significance has been recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Culture and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

This station was built in 1906 to replace a previous one destroyed by fire.

While it looked like a taxi – it was a full time inspection vehicle that could use railway tracks to inspect the condition of the rail bed,

Motorists driving by might have noticed a bright yellow old-time car in the front of the station. It’s a Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo rail inspection car. Currently, it’s in a shed but will be brought out again as soon as necessary adjustments are made.

Roger Ryan, whose wife is the niece of Stan Roskovich, the last person to work as station agent before it closed in 1988, showed up with a bag of memorabilia.

VIA Rail and GO Transit trains still were using the station up until then.

R. Paul Johnson, 88, plays the role of station agent. Photo by DENIS GIBBONS

Eighty-eight-year-old R. Paul Johnson, whose grandfather Alfred Johnson once operated the swing bridge for the railway over the Burlington Canal, posed as station agent for the day.

There are 12 tour stops at the Freeman Station. Among them are the station master’s office, baggage room, waiting room, a giant caboose and boxcar and a memorial to Burlington’s fallen military heroes who left from the station to defend their country in war. Some never returned and are buried in European cemeteries.

The waiting room will be available as meeting space for use by small groups.

Sitting on some “cribbing” with a sign badly in need of several coats of paint, the Freeman Station gets ready for its big move.

Before the location beside Burlington Fire Department headquarters on Fairview Street, between Brant and Maple Avenue, was settled on, Burlingtonians listed Beachway Park directly across from the Joseph Brant Museum as their first choice.

It has a significant historical context because the Hamilton Radial Railway and Hamilton & Northern Railway used to run right past it parallel to Burlington Beach.

Passengers from Toronto used to disembark at a nearby station for dinner and dancing at the old Brant Inn.

The Freeman station got moved around a number of times while the city figured out what it wanted to do with the thing. When city council failed to come up with a solution citizens did.

Central Park and Maple Park also were considered and Aldershot resident Bill Fasullo recommended Hidden Valley Park where it could be rented by the local model railroad club and second to move it close to the Aldershot GO train station, which is on the same rail line it used to service.

The Burlington Sports Hall of Fame had earlier indicated an interest in using the building. The City of Toronto also had asked about using the old station as a gift shop at its Toronto Rail Heritage Centre.

Future open house dates include May 21, June 11, July 1 (Canada Day), August 8, September 10 and October 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

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Unaffordable housing is bad for everyone: many don’t want to discuss real solutions

By Connor Fraser,

April 28th ,2022

BURLINGTON, ON

OPINION

 

Everyone is keenly aware of how unaffordable housing has become in our community and across other regions of the province. Many young people are now facing the reality of never being able to own in the region where they grew up. They are making tough decisions to live farther and farther away from work, and endure gruelling commutes that will impact their mental health and the environment. Darrell Bricker of Ipsos Public Affairs observed in a recent interview for the Ontario 360 Initiative that the outlook of Ontarians (and in particular young Ontarians) for their futures, has darkened, driven in large part by declining housing affordability.

While on the surface it may seem like just another issue, unaffordability has been created by diverse and complicated factors. Its costs are moreover sinister and threaten the future quality of life for all Ontarians.

There are very few locations where new single detached homes are being built – it is all high rise for Burlington going forward.

Since the 1960’s municipal zoning bylaws have set us on a collision course with this problem. Vast tracts of land are “locked up” with low-density, single-detached designations. Any attempt to introduce higher density (even modest 3 or 4 storey multi-units) are met with arguments of “neighbourhood character preservation” and ferocious opposition from existing homeowners. While “NIMBYs” perpetuate the problem and are convenient scapegoats, they are not responsible for decades-old zoning bylaws.

I am genuinely concerned that we have not learned any lessons in Ontario. Low-density urban sprawl continues at breakneck speeds. New development must be encouraged, but with an eye for much higher density and transit-oriented communities.

This connects with the second and perhaps most sinister and intractable cause of unaffordable housing: Significant numbers of Ontarian’s want low-density housing. The Anglo-American mindset romanticizes fierce independence and individualism. Unless you’ve got a driveway and your own tiny patch of grass, you’re not successful. Ironically, many of my friends who complain about skyrocketing prices are adamant in their desire to own a single-detached house. It’s understandable that many keenly aspire to a goal that was attainable for older generations – but I think it’s more important to realize that those goals may have been unsustainable. Regretfully, convincing so many that fulfilling lives may still exist within higher density settings (take Quebec as a good example) is a politically suicidal task.

The costs of unaffordable housing are immense. The future economic growth (and in turn quality of life and government services) of Ontario and Burlington relies upon attracting top employees and firms. Many investments have been made to transform Toronto and the GTA into a technology hub and take advantage of the intangible economy. Expensive housing and long commutes threaten that transformation. They are major obstacles to those considering whether to make Ontario their home. If you’re someone opposed to urban intensification in Burlington or elsewhere, consider that in 30 – 40 years you’ll likely need and want timely and effective healthcare services. Who’s going to pay for it if those who would’ve lived here and created value with their talent, have been driven from the province by unaffordability, thereby crippling the tax base?

Pierre Poilievre: targeting his message to people who are angry.

Rising home prices also open the door for populist leaders on the fringes of the political spectrum to gain power by capitalizing on anger. Under normal circumstances, such individuals would never be considered for public office. The federal Conservative leadership race has already seen examples of candidates trying to exploit anger over house prices and inflation for political gain.

I don’t see this problem being resolved in the near future. The composition of infrastructure changes very slowly, many aspire to live in low-density settings, and there are limited options for English-speaking young people in Canada: This is a slight simplification, but all the best jobs are in Toronto or Vancouver.

At the very least, the province must intervene by overriding municipal zoning bylaws to promote “missing middle” 3-4 storey multi-unit housing. Furthermore, the province could become more aggressive with mandating that all new development be higher density and transit oriented.

Could Perth, ON close to Ottawa with a lovely idyllic setting be made a larger community? The locals wouldn’t buy it

Other options that should be explored include actively building out secondary urban centres within Canada, and making these locations attractive to live. Even within Ontario, there are many regions that might be targeted for significant growth, such as Windsor and Thunder Bay. With a limited number of serious economic hubs compared to the United States, we risk over-concentrating demand for housing to an extent that local actors cannot solve.

The ultimate solution to this problem is compromise. On one hand, those in existing neighbourhoods should reflect that low-density housing was always an unsustainable, exclusive and very costly goal. Moreover, young people and those hoping to start families should reflect that remaining attached to an unsustainable ideal is going to make their lives unnecessarily difficult and unhappy. For the simple reason that many are unwilling to compromise, unaffordable housing is here to stay.

Connor Fraser is a post graduate student at the University of Toronto enrolled in the dual Master of Global Affairs and Master of Business Administration program.

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Ward 4 Councillor broadcast to her constituents and tells them about a new program from city hall.

By Pepper Parr

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Asked if she would run again Coun. Stolte cited her “disappointment and frustration had overwhelmed her on the day but that she was waiting for the results of this  coming weeks reports regarding the in camera closed meetings. Coun. Stolte expressed her sincerest gratitude for the many constituents, larger community members and staff that have been very thoughtful and encouraging 

Getting people to take part in a ward meeting is a tricky business. Council members can promote the event but it is up to people to actually get out to the meeting. Covid has limited what people are prepared to do.

City technical types basically set up a broadcast studio in the Community Room at Tansley Woods. From there they can broadcast out, allowing Councillor Stolte to speak to people participating in the room remotely and bring in people who are participating from their home or office. Theoretically this could have been an international event if there were people in the United States or the UK who had some experience helping people to get to know their neighbours.

Lisa Kearns was the first Councillor who managed to set up a hybrid meeting and make it work. The live people in the AGB, where Kearns holds her meetings had less than eight people first time out.

Ward 4 Councillor Shawna Stolte

Ward 4 Councillor Shawna Stolte, who announced during the Integrity report delivery and debate that she was not cut out for this kind of work and that she would not run for office again in October.

Glenn Nicholson, served as a community focal point on his street when many of his neighbours were flooded in 2014

A potential candidate showed up at the ward 4 meeting Wednesday night along with eight others and 30 people taking part on line.

Taking part on line requires the creating of what amounts to a small broadcasting studio to capture what is being said by those who participate on line and those in the meeting room, which in this case was in the Tansley Woods community centre.

Stolte went one step further than Kearns when she had a city staff member taking part virtually and talking about a city program we had not heard about before.

Burlington now has a small collection of “connectors” – people who help other people connect to others in their neighbourhood.

Sounded like a really good idea that seems to be working. Something to follow up with for more detail.

At this point here is what we can tell you.

A connector “self-selects” – they do that by getting in touch with Jennifer Spence at City Hall

Spence meets with the person, often over a cup of coffee and talks about what the person would like to do, what they know about the program and then explains in detail what the program is and how these self-selected connectors can do their thing.  You can reach city staff running the program at:  communityconnects@burlington.ca .

Mary Alice St James, a retired elementary school principal and a candidate for Council in ward 5 during the last municipal election, identified herself during the meeting as a “super” level connector, which is something that would be hard to argue with.

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How Not to Get Mad at Loved Ones: 6 Ways to Manage Emotions

By Kate Brown

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Everyone experiences negative emotions from time to time. You may have been taught as a child to suppress them, but it’s natural to be angry. The main thing is not to let your feelings become the reason for quarrels with other people. You can learn to control anger by understanding what causes it and expressing it in healthier ways.

Imagine the situation: you boil when the boss asks you to do extra work. Perhaps it’s not the first time it’s happened because another employee has again failed to complete his duties on time. You’re fed up and feel like you’re about to explode. Then you gather your coworkers and tell them what you think of them. Gradually your anger fades and you feel better, but you realize from the surprised looks on the faces of those around you that this was not the best way to deal with your emotions.

Usually the cause of anger is an underlying problem. It’s possible that you’re tired of doing everything for everyone at work and it’s high time you built personal boundaries. You no longer want to take on the responsibilities of colleagues who are not up to the task. Anger and quarrels will not help change the situation, it’s much more productive to learn to express emotions in other ways.

How to Control Anger
There are several ways to control anger. By following the simple instructions on this list, you can activate your parasympathetic nervous system, which means you can calm down and relax. You’ll cope with anxiety and stress, your mood will improve, and your blood pressure will return to normal. Here’s what will help you not snap when you’re experiencing strong negative emotions.

Take a Break
Take time out and go for a short walk. This will allow you to reflect for a while before reacting to events emotionally. Go outside, feel the warmth of the sun, listen to the leaves rustling in the wind. Focus your attention on the world around you. Forget about the most pleasurable things, like gambling at a Canadian casino online or your favorite movie you’ve watched recently. This will activate your frontal cortex, and strong negative emotions will subside.

Awareness or Short Meditation
Close your eyes, slow your breathing, and allow yourself to calm down, relaxing your whole body. Take your mind to a place where you once felt happy. It could be the seashore, the mountains, or the arms of a loved one.

Writing a journal is an opportunity to put your feelings down on paper – you’ll be surprised how you feel when you go back and read them later.

Write a Diary
When you are angry, write an uncensored letter to the person who triggered your negative emotion. You can do this on paper or in your smartphone notes. Afterwards, reread the letter and try to figure out what experiences caused you to defend yourself through anger. Perhaps you feel humiliated or you are frightened by uncertainty. There is no need to send the letter to the addressee; it’s better to tear up the sheet or erase what you have written. This kind of practice helps you to structure your thoughts, find the true causes of your emotions, and cope with stress.

Deep Breathing
This method of anger management seems too simple, but it really works. The key is to start using it. If you are boiling over, but you cannot leave the room and need to continue talking to the person who provoked the negative emotion in you, turn away to breathe and count to ten. During this time, you will be able to determine the cause of your anger and outline a plan of action.

Exercise
If you are overcome by anger, do some simple exercises or swim in the pool. Exercise releases endorphins that make you feel better. It’s impossible to leave a workout with the same level of stress that you came to class with. Your anxiety level will decrease, making it easier for you to make informed decisions.

Anti-stress Accessories
The easiest and most affordable of these is a wrist expander. Squeeze and unclench the exercises in the palms of your hands. Monotonous actions will help to cope with stress and relax. Bonus – strong hands and excellent grip, the main thing – do not forget to change hands periodically. “I-affirmations.”

If you feel yourself boiling over, directly (but calmly) tell the person you’re talking to what you think about what’s going on. Use “I-affirmations” and don’t get personal. For example, you might say to your boss, “I’m puzzled by what you said.” My part of the project was done yesterday.” Such communication will provide new information and allow your boss to see the situation from a new perspective.

Speaking calmly and directly – takes the heat out of a conversation

Regardless of which way you choose to deal with your emotions, it’s important to identify the cause of your anger and recognize the difference between healthy and chronic stress. Understanding what makes you angry will help you deal with future outbursts of anger. If your anger is related to the other person’s actions, let them know how and why their actions affect you. The conversation should begin in a calm atmosphere – after you can pull yourself together. Together with the person, you are talking to, come up with a plan for how to communicate in the future.

Take time to get to know yourself better and develop emotional intelligence. If you learn to manage your emotions and stop snapping at others, you can strengthen communication and make your relationship healthier.

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Can Burlington do what Milton is setting out to do - rescue the citizens of the city.

By Pepper Parr

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If Milton can do it – Burlington certainly can.

The Milton Chamber of Commerce has partnered with Bell as a Community and are putting together what they will bring to an and this once-in-a-lifetime experience we have all been working through.

So many of us have been working remotely and not able to network and gather like we once did.
Milton is setting out to change that – Burlington has the capacity to do that.

Rotary managed to rescue and event despite COVID19 – how can Burlington create an event to rescue its citizensÉ

Rotary found a way to take over the Burlington Centre parking lot for their modified Rib Fest – perhaps the Chamber can do something similar.

The Milton Chamber is calling their event the ‘Welcome Back from Hibernation BBQ’ to network, see new and familiar faces, enjoy local food and drink, all while enjoying some music.

Watching and waiting to see what might come out of the woods in Burlington.

 

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Art Gallery Guilds - the foundation the AGB was built on - holding their All Guild Exhibit April 29 to August 13th

By Staff

April 26th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

One of the things that makes the Art Gallery difference and distinct are the Guilds.

They are the foundation on which the Gallery as it exists today was built

Friday the Guilds come together and show the public what they have been doing while the pandemic took away the opportunity to visit the Gallery and enjoy what it has to offer.

A day or so ago we were shown a photograph taken by Frank Meyers that has been accepted for the Exhibition that opens on Friday.

A Frank Meyer photograph that has been accepted for the All Guilds Exhibition that opens on Friday

 

Attend and see what else they have to share.

The annual exhibition celebrates the guilds who make, learn, share, and teach at the Art Gallery of Burlington.

Burlington Fine Arts Association,

Burlington Handweavers and Spinners Guild,

Latow Photographers Guild,

Burlington Potters Guild,

Burlington Hooking Craft Guild,

Burlington Sculptors and Carvers,

Digital Arts Guild of Burlington.

Exhibition runs through to August 13th

AGB Hours

Tuesday – Friday 12 PM – 5 PM
Saturday 10 AM – 5 PM
Sunday & Monday CLOSED

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Saturday night at the Opera - only in Burlington

By Staff

April 26th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Southern Ontario Lyric Opera (SOLO). We will be performing at the Burlington Performing Arts Centre on Saturday May 14th featuring two outstanding young Canadian singers.

Southern Ontario Lyric Opera (SOLO) Presents:
Encore!
Favourite Moments in Opera
Saturday May 14, 2022, 7:30 P.M.
Burlington Performing Arts Centre
Karoline Podolak, Soprano
Alexander Hajek, Baritone
Southern Ontario Lyric Opera Chorus and Orchestra
Sabatino Vacca, Conductor

Join them as they present a programme of operatic favourites featuring works by Mozart, Rossini, Verdi, and more!

For tickets please call the Box Office at 905 681 6000
Or online at https://burlingtonpac.ca/events/solo-encore-favourite-moments-in-opera/

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