Three people who made major contributions to the arts in Burlington recognized and placed in Hall of Fame

By Staff

June 24th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Performing Arts Centre’s Hall of Fame recognizes persons who have made significant contributions to the performing arts in Burlington (individual or group).

Recipients of this award demonstrate the diversity of artistic accomplishment that comprises the rich cultural tapestry of the City of Burlington. The Hall of Fame award is normally presented to the inductee at BPAC’s Season Launch events.

The Hall of Fame awards are designed by Teresa Seaton.

Boris Brott Lifetime Achievement

Boris Brott

Boris Brott, OC OOnt (March 14, 1944 – April 5, 2022) was a Canadian conductor and motivational speaker. He was one of the most internationally recognized Canadian conductors, having conducted on stages around the world, including Carnegie Hall and Covent Garden. He was known for his innovative methods of introducing classical music to new audiences. Over his career, he commissioned, performed, and recorded a wide variety of Canadian works.

Brott was the founder and artistic director of the National Academy Orchestra of Canada and the Brott Music Festival, both based in Hamilton, Ontario. He was the founding music director and Conductor Laureate of the New West Symphony in Los Angeles, and artistic director and Conductor of the Orchestre classique de Montreal (formerly the McGill Chamber Orchestra. He was a former Principal Youth and Family conductor with the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, where he conducted family and education concerts.

Don Allan is a 2022 Inductee to the Hall of Fame

Don Allan

The name Don Allan will ring a bell for many Burlington residents, especially those with ties to the Burlington Teen Tour Band (also inducted into the BPAC Hall of Fame in 2017). Many refer to Don as Burlington’s Music Man. After spending time in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a clarinetist, Don taught music here in the Halton District School Board and then became the Director of the Burlington Teen Tour Band and later the Burlington Concert Band. With over 40 years of bringing music to youth and taking them around the world to showcase the talent we have here in Burlington, we are pleased to announce that Don Allan is the recipient of the 2022, Hall of Fame Induction.

Gary DeGroote is a 2022 inductee to the Hall of Fame

From the right: Executive Director of the Performing Arts Centre, Tammy Fox, Gary DeGroote and his wife.  The art work was created by Teresa Seaton

Philanthropist, Gary DeGroote, will take a place in our Hall of Fame as our 2021 Inductee for his incredible contribution to the arts. BPAC’s existence was dependent on a lead gift, something to begin the campaign of raising the funds to build and establish a theatre for the entire community to enjoy. This lead gift was given by no other than Gary DeGroote. He also sat on the Campaign Cabinet as Co- Chair and used his leadership and passion for culture to drive the fundraising initiative which eventually culminated in the opening of Burlington’s world class theatre 11 years ago. Gary insisted the building not bear his or his family name and so it is with great pleasure that we induct him to our Hall of Fame to be recognized again for his contribution and commitment to the Arts.

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A musical powerhouse on stage at Performing Arts Centre - four Canadian talents: Murray McLauchlan, Cindy Church, Marc Jordan and Ian Thomas.

By Staff

June 24th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Lunch At Allen’s is a musical powerhouse comprising four remarkable Canadian talents: Murray McLauchlan, Cindy Church, Marc Jordan and Ian Thomas.

As individuals, they have written for or sung on over 25,000,000 CDs, penning hits for Josh Groban, Chicago, Bonnie Raitt, America, Santana, Cher and Rod Stewart, as well as Murray’s Farmer’s Song, Marc’s Marina Del Rey and Ian’s Painted Ladies, just to name a few.

These three artists have come together adding the incredible voice of Cindy Church (Quartette, Great Western Orchestra) to form Lunch At Allen’s. Attending their stage show is to embark on an intimate musical journey replete with laughter and personal anecdotes, familiar favourites and new material, fashioning an unforgettable evening’s entertainment …from their hearts …to your soul.

On stage at the Performing arts Centre June 29th.

“You would be hard pressed to find another Canadian ensemble with more collective depth of influence over Canada’s musical landscape than Lunch At Allen’s.” – The Beat Magazine

Dates & Times

Wed Jun 29, 2022 at 7:30pm

Venue – Main Theatre

Ticket Prices

Regular: $67.50 (All-in)

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Some very pointed questions from well informed people on the Bateman High School property. Why is city hall making this so difficult?

By Pepper Parr

June 21st, 2022
BURLINGTON, ON
The Procedural Bylaw determines what you can say and how you must say it when you are delegating before city council.
They like it that way.  I will come back to that Bylaw later.
It’s a little different when citizens can put what they are thinking and feeling about the plans to purchase Bateman emails/questions posed
The following are questions that were sent to the city by residents.

Why is the business of purchasing this property proving to be so difficult – it is really about one pocket of public money being put into a different pocket of public money.

1. Hi there,
I would like to give feedback on the project. Hope this is the correct forum.

I have lived in Burlington my entire life, I have been a volunteer in various areas from
sports to mental health.

My family [Greg/Andrea] Howard has been recognized for work in the community.
Today I am 45 years old – the last two ice arenas that have opened were Mainway in
the 1980’s / then Appleby in the 2000’s.

Our population continues to grow, our recreational infrastructure for ice sports / indoor
events does not.

Youth hockey is growing, girls and women’s hockey continues to grow, adult programs
are growing.

Arena’s are destinations, and I would bet besides the sound of music festival and
soccer fields – more visitors come to these arena’s / rec. centers than other place in
Burlington.

The “Skyway” rec center project is now used to hold city arborists equipment. We have
now reduced arenas, not grown them

The city of Burlington needs to look at this project with the inclusion of an arena. The
youth deserve it.

Hope someone can acknowledge this.
I’m happy to discuss more.

Thanks, Justin Howard

2. Turn the available land into a much needed full ice and training facility for our
youth. Ice availability in our City is not sufficient for the demand. Our youth are
shortchanged when it comes to ice sports!

Do something to make our residents proud without turning it into another pier
disaster! Dave Guluche

3. Why did the city not have a public engagement plan in place from when it decided
to pursue the acquisition of the property? Jim Thompson

4. When will the traffic studies be complete?
5. What is the plan for removing the asbestos on the site?
6. What is the plan for removing the asbestos on the site? (see above, in the
FAQs)

7. When will the traffic studies be complete?
CM-17-22

8. “What regulation prevents the release of the cost information? The city offer was
accepted by the school board so why the need for secrecy?”

9. Good Morning, I’m glad to see and very much support the proposed adaptive
reuse of Robert Bateman High School by the City of Burlington for a combination
of community and educational uses. I am particularly happy to see the relocation
of the New Appleby public library branch to a more appropriate long term home.
Thank you to city staff and council for your leadership in making this happen.

10. Why is the city rushing engagement – how much is this going to cost the city
taxpayer?

11. Why is the city not answering any questions regarding this project – who wrote
the FAQ.

12. How can a survey that was only up for one day and an information that only
lasted 90 minutes be considered as adequate public engagement?

13. There are outstanding questions that needs to be answered.
who provided the money to purchase the property in question?

who provided the money to build the school sitting on the property?

In both cases it was the TAXPAYER. Therefore the TAXPAYER should receive
the money back, NOT have to “PAY AGAIN” for the City to obtain the property &
building.

We TAXPAYERS would like these questions answered!!!

Some additional questions from the Gazette.

Why is this engagement business being handled so badly?

Is anyone in the Communications department even listening?

And that Procedural Bylaw – it gets written for Council based on what they want the bylaw to be – why isn’t this an election issue?

Why isn’t there a group people (10 or so is all it would take)  to go over the document, re-write and then lobby the members of Council and put together a petition and press council until they make changes to the document.

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Dance Academy - Year End Event - Together Again

By Staff

June 21st, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Dance Academy is presenting their year-end performance “Together Again”. From our youngest dancers to our graduating students our show is certain to entertain every one of all ages!

At the Performing Arts Centre June 25th and 26th

Serving Burlington for over 60 years, Burlington Dance Academy is the most tenured dance school in the community.

The fully qualified and accredited faculty’s goal is to provide a love of dance as well as excellence in dance training for students of all ages and abilities.

The Academy believes in developing co-operation, teamwork and self-discipline. – life skills that transcend dance. They offer instruction in Classical Ballet, Pointe, Jazz, Tap, Lyrical, Hip Hop, Contemporary, Acro and Creative Movement.

Dates & Times

Sat Jun 25, 2022 at 2:30pm
Sun Jun 26, 2022 at 2:30pm

Venue

Main Theatre

Ticket Prices

Regular: $40 (All-in)
Child (under 2 years): $22 (All-in)

Also offering fantastic summer camps!

Visit them at www.bdacademy.ca

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If you ever wanted to know what footloose really means - It will all be on stage at the Performing Arts Centre this week

By Staff

June 20th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Footnotes Senior Performing Troupe  –  Gotta SING, Gotta DANCE will be on stage at the Performing Arts Centre Tuesday and Wednesday of this week.

Our apologies for the delay in getting this information to you.

This is a bunch of ladies who like to get out of the house, without their husbands and laugh it up.  And do some pretty fancy footwork.

They are a scream – worth the time.

Tue Jun 21, 2022 at 2pm

Tue Jun 21, 2022 at 7pm

Wed Jun 22, 2022 at 2pm

Gotta SING, Gotta DANCE! is an exciting tribute to the art of staying young showcasing music, comedy and dance. It’s a lavish production featuring a brand new line-up of upbeat and fast paced entertainment presented by the inspiring talents of the 50+ generation.

Ticket Prices

Regular: $34.50 (All-in)

Child (12 and under): $19.50 (All-in)

Group of 20 or More (Visit or call the Box Office at 905.681.6000)

Group: $31 (All-in)

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A parade -what a great way to let the city look at itself

By Denis Gibbons

June 20TH, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Mayor struts in the parade

Faraway fields look green for some Burlingtonians who fork out their hard-earned cash to travel to Caribbean destinations for a holiday.

They’re leaving a venue just as beautiful right under their noses.

Breezes at the Spencer Smith Park waterfront Saturday rivaled the West Indies as bright sunshine created a marvelous vista for the Sound of Music Festival.

Spectators filled the stands on Brant St. in front of city hall.

Some parents brought their children to the tiny beach. Yes, that’s right – a beach right at the foot of the city’s main street. How many towns and cities envy that ?

Boats even conveyed passengers over from Hamilton through the Burlington Canal to enjoy the festival.

On Saturday morning the Burlington Teen Tour Band and Top Hat Marching Orchestra led the Grand Festival Parade, with Mayor Marianne Meed Ward dancing along the way. The mayor walked the entire route, rather than riding in a car.

Bringing up the rear was the massive Burlington Teen Tour Alumni Band, which got the loudest applause of all. It was fascinating to see musicians who marched as teens 40 years ago still able to play their instruments and keeping up to the beat of the drums

The Burlington Teen Tour Band

 

Some fans listened to the music from their boats out in the lake. They were short far too many life jackets.

 

The British are back!

 

Gymnasts performed in front of Scrivener’s on Brant Street. Above the BTTB Alumni

The Naval Promenade was packed on a sunny Saturday afternoon

COGECO-TV Channel 23 and 700 HD will show a replay of the parade on Tuesday, June 21 at 2 p.m.

There could be other replays as well. Viewers should check COGECO listings on the web.

All photos by DENIS GIBBONS

 

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Concerts in the Park begin today. Teen Tour Band to perform

By Staff

June 19th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The outdoor concerts at the Band shell in Central |Park begin this evening and will continue through to the end of August.

The season will start with performances by Burlington Teen Tour Band, Burlington Junior Redcoats, BTTB Alumni

The program is sponsored by the city and the Rocca Sisters Team, a real estate agency.

Bring a chair and a blanket this evening – starts at 7:30 pm

The Burlington Teen Tour Band playing on the Naval Promenade in Spencer Smith Park

 

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SoM crowds described as fantastic - weather cooperates. Parade on Saturday

By Denis Gibbons

June 17th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Hot weather accompanied the opening of Burlington’s Sound of Music Festival at Spencer Smith Park Thursday night. The Promenade along the waterfront was jammed with people, with more taking in the rock music from their boats out in the lake.

With the beautiful Burlington skyline as a backdrop, folks listen to the music. Burlington’s version of front row seats

Members of the Honeymoon Suite group signed autographs for fans at the west end of the park after they performed. The midway and concession stands were doing a booming business. Freshly squeezed lemonade, hot dogs, hamburgers and candy floss were among the treats being offered.

The Grand Festival Parade starts at 11 a.m. Saturday, starting at Central Park, heading west on Caroline Street to Elizabeth, south to James, west to Brant and then north to Burlington Central high school.

The Sound didn’t go over that well with some people; one Gazette reader reacted to a story we did with this:

It was great sounds coming out of big big bass speakers.

For the record….not everyone thinks that the Sound of Music is “soothing”.  The noise from the bass was so loud last evening I sent an email to Lisa, and the by-law officer.  I can only imagine what Don Fletcher was dealing with.  His windows must have been shaking.  There is no need for the bass to be that loud under any circumstances.  A friend who lives on Smith Avenue told me the noise was awful.

 

All photos by DENIS GIBBONS

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Sound of Music soothes the city - lyrics by Three Days Grace might have been an omen

By Denis Gibbons

June 17th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Normal, normal and more normal with the sound of the bands laying in the background and hundreds upon hundreds of people strolling along.

The weather was perfect for much of the day – seeing people out and about was just wonderful.

Darron Repton with Jessica Genereaux

Darron Repton, an aspiring rap artist who performs under the stage name ‘Talk Sic’, attended Thursday night’s performances with Jessica Genereaux, who operates her own beauty spa ‘Browzamore’ in Burlington.  Repton has been enjoying the festival since he was five years old. It was the first for Genereaux, who just moved here from Waterloo. Talk Sic has toured all over Canada. Repton also has a job at Tamarack Lumber.

Jim Corbett, who enjoyed the music Thursday night with daughter Abby, a Grade 10 student at Assumption high school..

Saturday’s parade will go right past the office of chiropractor Jim Corbett, who enjoyed the music Thursday night with daughter Abby, a Grade 10 student at Assumption high school. Jim was born just down the street at Joseph Brant Hospital and has been in practice for 22 years. He used to play a little guitar with a buddy, but not in an organized band.

Wowie Lon Toc of Mississauga and Mary Bolla of Hamilton

Wowie Lon Toc of Mississauga and Mary Bolla of Hamilton were surprised to find the festival when they met for dinner at Spencer’s On The Waterfront.  They decided to take an after-dinner stroll and were glad they did. Both trace their roots back to The Philippines and sing in the choir at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Mississauga.

Azadeh Newrozi, son Farbod and little dog Leo.

It was the first festival for Azadeh Newrozi, son Farbod and little dog Leo.  The family hails from Tehran, the capital city of Iran, and has been living in Burlington for the last three years.

Diana Vinski

A chemical engineer with Metrican, at Appleby Line and Mainway, Diana Vinski particularly liked the music of Three Days Grace, last week, and was at Spencer Smith Park on Thursday night to listen to Skid Row.

Originally from Oakville, Vinski said the festival is “1,000 times better than the Oakville Waterfront Festival, held annually at Coronation Park in that town. She made the statement, even at the risk of never getting a job at Tourism Oakville!

 

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Burlington Farmers Market Open on Canada Day

By Staff

June 14th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Celebrate Canada Day Friday, July 1 while shopping for fresh Market Products at the Burlington Centre parking lot. (Prospect St east of Guelph Line).

Bring the family. Free cupcakes for customers at 10:00 am, while they last. Fire truck on display.

Chat mid-morning with MP the Hon. Karina Gould, Minister of Families, Children & Social Development.

Burlington Mayor Marianne Meed Ward will also attend.

Saturday, July 2 is the alternative if Friday is cancelled by bad weather.

The Market, in its 64th consecutive year, features 43 vendors from all over Southern Ontario to serve you.

It is a long-term project of the Burlington Lions Club in service to the community and local vendors.

• Fruit/Produce/Cheese/Wine & Craft Beer/Flowers/Smoked Meats/Baked Goods/Honey/Preserves/Meat Pies.

The Market opens at 8:00 AM Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays until October 29th.

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City sets out how it plans to Celebrate Canada’s birthday at Spencer Smith Park

By Staff

June 14th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City of Burlington is excited to return to an in-person Canada Day celebration in Spencer Smith Park on July 1.

Fire works on the waterfront with the pier in the background.

This year’s event will start with an opening ceremony at 4 p.m. followed by evening entertainment on the main stage and the grand finale of a spectacular firework display presented by Bunzl over the lake at 10 p.m.

The event will also feature food and market place vendors.

For our early risers and active residents, a Canada Day Run and Yoga in the park will be held in the morning in Spencer Smith Park.

Other Canada Day Activities

There are plenty of fun options for the family this Canada Day throughout the city, such as splash pads and pools. All nine of the City’s splash pad locations are open and always free.

Nelson Outdoor Pool & Splash Park and LaSalle Wading Pool are open for swimming on Canada day (weather permitting). If you prefer to swim indoors visit Angela Coughlan Pool. For times of swims at all locations, visit burlington.ca/dropinandplay.

Canada Day is a great time to get outside, explore Burlington and get active. Take our Get Outside and Play Challenge, and complete 90 activities in 90 days. The challenge is on now until Aug. 29, 2022. Win great prizes!

 “It’s been two long years since we’ve had the Canada Day celebrations in-person and we are excited to bring this very popular, award winning event to our community. We are looking forward to a great evening with some spectacular fireworks” said a city spokesperson.

Links

burlington.ca/canadaday

burlington.ca/playoutside

burlington.ca/splashpads

 

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Boats will go into the water on the 16th: LPMA members happy campers

By Pepper Parr

June 9th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There will be life at the marina.

The LaSalle Park Marina Association has secured the insurance they needed; a crane has been booked and the lift in is set for June 16th.

Boats will go into water on the 16th

The city hasn’t has had to put in as much as a dime. The LPMA paid for the services of a lawyer the city was going to bring in to oversee the joint venture loan agreements.  The LPMA is paying for the use of the waterlots that are owned by Hamilton and the LPMA is continuing to pay the fees that are part of the agreement they have with the city.

The thought that the city would have to take over operation of the marina – won’t happen.

They will be hoisting the pewter mugs with tots of rum when the lift in is complete.

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Sound of Music road closures June 11, 16-19

By Staff

June 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

It is that time of year – again.

The 43rd annual Sound of Music Festival is taking place over two weekends: June 11 and June 16 to 19, 2022.

The crowds pay a premium to gather at the edge of the stages.

To meet the needs of the festival and to ensure public safety, road closures are noted below.
Parade route streets will re-open as soon as possible after the parade on June 18. Vehicles parked illegally in the event area will be tagged or towed for emergency access.

Road Closures
Emergency Road Closures:
• June 11 and June 16 to June 18 nightly from 10 p.m. to midnight; and
• June 19 from 6 to 8:30 p.m.:
• Lakeshore Road from Elizabeth Street to Maple Avenue.

Streetfest Closures:
• Saturday, June 18 from 3 a.m. to Sunday, June 19 at 8 p.m.:
• Brant Street from Caroline Street to Lakeshore Road.

Parade Closures:
Saturday, June 18 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the following streets will be closed:
• Baldwin Street from Hurd Avenue to Brant Street
• Brant Street from James Street to Baldwin Street
• Drury Lane from Courtland Drive to New Street
• Caroline Street from Drury Lane to Elizabeth Street
• James Street from Brant Street to Elizabeth Street
• Elizabeth Street from Caroline Street to James Street
Parking Restrictions Posted
• Please do not park in restricted areas.
• See parking rules at each pay machine.

Traffic Supervision
Road closures will be managed under the supervision of the Halton Regional Police Service. Emergency access will be maintained at all times in the event area.
Event notices were delivered to all residences, religious centres and businesses affected by the event.

Road Closures or Traffic Control Information
Event Liaison, City of Burlington, 905-335-7600, ext. 7704
Burlington Transit Delays and Information
Bus route detours in effect for Routes 2, 4 and 10.
Minor delays in the downtown core should be expected on all festival dates.

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How do butterflies relate to Climate Change? Encourage your child to become a Butterflyways Ranger and they will tell you.

By Staff

June 8th,  2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

They fascinate almost everyone – the 7 to 11 age group wanted to hold them in their hands.

You may not have heard about the Butterfly Project – but you have certainly heard about Climate Change.

How do you explain Climate Change to children between the ages of 7 and 11?

The older children get it and often become champions.

For the 7-11 set it’s a different situation. However they are the demographic that tends to be fascinated by Butterflys.

Gloria Reid and her pal Sharon Clark who are now officially Butterfly Rangers and have brought the David Susuki led initiative that started with five Canadian cities in 2017 to Burlington..

The Butterflyway Project is a volunteer-led movement that’s bringing nature home to neighbourhoods throughout Canada, one butterfly-friendly planting at a time.

They recruited a team of volunteer Butterflyway Rangers in each community. Their mission was to plant native wildflowers in yards, schoolyards, streets and parks to support bees and butterflies. The goal was to establish local “Butterflyways” by planting at least a dozen pollinator patches in each neighbourhood or community.

Over the past five years, they have recruited and trained more than a thousand Butterflyway Rangers from hundreds of communities. They’ve connected with neighbours, schools, city agencies, businesses and community groups. To date, they’ve helped:

    Get 85,000+ butterfly-friendly wildflowers into the ground.

    Create 6,000+ pollinator patches for wild bees and butterflies.

    Establish official Butterflyways in 75 communities and neighbourhoods.

Gloria Reid and her pal Sharon decided to grow a Ranger Group in Burlington.  They expect to show that a small group of residents can make a big difference. Rangers make their communities greener and healthier. They create opportunities, connect people and champion fun ideas.

Apply HERE to be a Butterflyway Ranger

You can also apply at this address.

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Connor Fraser: travelling around Burlington on a bicycle is inconvenient and borderline dangerous.

By Connor Fraser

June 8th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A significant portion of my life has been spent cycling around Burlington. During high school, my commute often took me along Plains Road. On weekends, my friends and I would find our way to Spencer Smith Park and the beach. From a young person’s perspective, safe cycling options go a long way towards cementing a lifelong commitment to healthy behaviour.

Lanes dedicated to cycling – some want to see barriers in place to protect cyclists.

If my experience has taught me one thing, it’s that travelling around Burlington on a bicycle is inconvenient and borderline dangerous. Bike lanes along major streets such as Plains Road are intermittent and full of potholes. Connecting lanes between neighbourhoods – such as the Lakeshore Road QEW underpass – are non-existent. Under such conditions, cyclists are forced to dismount and walk long distances, or take their chances in live traffic.

Thankfully, a number of large-scale cycling projects are about to break ground in Burlington. In 2022, Plains Road between Waterdown Road and Spring Gardens Road will be resurfaced and buttoned up with protected cycling facilities. In 2025, Prospect Street and the remainder of Plains Road are scheduled for installations.

While these projects are likely to cause short-term disruptions to residents’ lifestyles, they should be welcomed with enthusiasm and open-mindedness. Aligning near-perfectly with the city’s strategic goals, cycling is both an environmentally sustainable method of transportation, and one that promotes long-term physical and mental health. As much as bike lanes are a short-term investment to enable diverse forms of mobility, they are also a long-term investment in environmental health and preventative healthcare. People who are empowered to cycle more often due to the presence of a convenient cycling network are more likely to remain healthy and happy throughout their lives.

City photo op to promote cycling to work. Several very senior people in this picture even owned a bike.

Unfortunately, Burlington’s recent past has been marred with hostility towards the concept of bike lanes. The New Street Bike Lane Pilot was removed in 2018 following the recommendations of a report entitled “New Street pilot project review and resurfacing.” While the report noted a common perception among residents that traffic along New Street became more congested during the pilot, the authors admitted that cause and effect was difficult to determine. For example, average westbound travel times between Walkers Line and Guelph Line increased by just 1.5 minutes during peak evening hours, while negligible travel time increases were noted for eastbound travel during peak hours. Moreover, when taking an average of datapoints over the entire day, impacts to travel times were minimal in both directions (+16 seconds westbound, +1 second eastbound). The report also found inconclusive evidence of traffic diversion onto adjacent roadways. Nevertheless, the New Street pilot was removed by council, setting back Burlington’s progress towards integrated mobility by several years.

Fast forward to the present, and conditions have changed such that all residents should be able to embrace, and also benefit from, upcoming cycling installations. Notably, the pandemic has enabled more people to work from home and avoid rush-hour traffic that some claim is aggravated by bike lanes.

Despite my above enthusiasm, progress towards building out the municipal cycling network is slow and suffers from critical underfunding. The New Street pilot project review and resurfacing report recommended (as a consolation) installing separated cycle tracks “for consideration in the 2019 to 2028 capital budget.” My sources at city hall informed me this project has been pushed until 2031 – a delay of at least 3 years. According to the 2022 Budget, several other projects that were listed as “high priority” by the 2021 Cycling Plan and initially targeted for completion by 2025 – have subsequently been pushed back. The Active Transportation Crossing of the QEW and Walker’s Line resurfacing will be delayed by 5-6 years and 2-3 years respectively beyond original timelines, documents suggest. We’ll see if anything changes once the Integrated Mobility Plan is released.

Is Burlington under equipped to make investments in public infrastructure and in particular cycling infrastructure? The media release page for the 2022 budget proudly displays how our municipal tax rate is significantly lower than other GTA municipalities (over 12.5% lower than the average municipality). If the consequence is that important projects must experience significant delays, it’s not a statistic to be proud of. We must be willing to pay for infrastructure upgrades, especially those that enhance quality of life to the extent that bike lanes will. Not only could there be noticeable upsides for property values (transit oriented communities are actually desirable for young people and young families), but the long term returns to personal, public and environmental health would be material and far outweigh any initial investment. One might argue that the above-cited delays are pandemic-related. However, our neighbours such as the City of Toronto used the pandemic as a catalyst for major expansions of their cycling networks.

The point is this. From my limited understanding, life is about compromise. That’s precisely what is happening here and why I hope to see uniform support behind city council and city staff. On one hand, Burlington is getting new cycling infrastructure. On the other hand, the projects have been delayed and will likely be completed incrementally over the next decade – keeping impacts on daily routines to an absolute minimum and allowing long periods for adjustment. Compromise.

I sincerely hope that most are enthusiastic about the upcoming cycling projects and are ready to eventually consider embracing cycling as a legitimate alternative to the automobile when it comes to getting around town!

Connor was born in Hamilton in 1997, is a long-time resident of Aldershot. He has volunteered for several local organizations and advocated to municipal leaders on building transit oriented, walkable communities.

 In 2020, Connor completed undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto, with a B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science and a major in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

  Connor has returned to U of T to enrol in the dual Master of Global Affairs and Master of Business Administration program.

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Community Development Halton Social Location and Systems of Oppression workshop rescheduled

By Staff

June 7th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Community Development Halton has rescheduled the Social Location and Systems of Oppression workshop to Wednesday June 15, 2022 at 12:30pm.

If you previously registered for the original date of May 31, you have received an email with instructions; if you missed registering earlier, you can register for the new date until June 13 at 5:00pm.

In this workshop you will walk away with:

• an understanding of your social location, systems of oppression, and common terms and how they relate to JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion;
• understanding and harnessing your power, holding power, and giving power;
• how to share power – where and how this is possible at all stages of the volunteer engagement cycle; and
• how to lead equitable volunteer programs regardless of your positional power within your organization and specific tactics to foster inclusion

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15, 2022
12:30PM – 2:00PM

Via ZOOM

Register Today at: CiviCRM | Community Development Halton (cdhalton.ca)

CDH Members: $15
Non-Members: $25

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This could be fun - probably one of the largest stick shift events in the Region.

By Staff

June 7th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This could be fun.

The event suggests that the Friends of Freeman Station are branching out and adding to the events that take place at one of the strongest destinations in the city.

 

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D Day - the sixth of June, 1944 Allied troops landed on the Beaches of Normandy

By Staff

June 6th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was the largest invasion ever assembled, before or since, landed 156,000 Allied troops by sea and air on five beachheads in Normandy, France.

It happened 78 years ago.

The names of some of the men who did not return are etched in the Cenotaph next to city hall

D-Day was the start of Allied operations which would ultimately liberate Western Europe, defeat Nazi Germany and end the Second World War.

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A Gazette reader has a question for you on the Bateman High School site that the city is in the process of purchasing

By Jeremy Skinner

June 5th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Much has been mentioned in the Gazette about the Bateman opportunity that is before us. I ask that each person who has contributed a comment thus far and are interested in the issue to respond by way of a comment to this article with your answers to the following two questions.

Question 1:
Do you believe that the City should acquire the Bateman property via a land swap which would enable the HDSB to acquire Wellington Park as part of their Burlington Central site?

If not, do you acknowledge the fact that the HDSB will likely be forced to sell the Bateman property to private as opposed to public interests? Note: Public access to Centennial Pool may be lost because it is owned by HDSB and operated by the City.

A lot of land and a lot of public interest.

Question 2:
(Answer only if yes to question 1. ) What do you believe that the Bateman property along with or without existing 220,000 sq. ft. 2 storey building should be used for?

Consider the fact that the City has received multiple offers from potential tenants seeking long term leases to reside in Bateman. These include:

– Brock University who wishes to relocate their Faculty of Education from Hamilton;
– HDSB who wishes to relocate their Burlington Gary Allan Learning Centre from 3250 New St.;
– Burlington Public Library Appleby Branch who wishes to relocate from Appleby Square Plaza (which will soon undergo redevelopment).
– TechPlace who wishes to establish presence in the East Burlington business community; and
– a City Community Centre complete with gym and pool facilities.

The long term leases from these tenants will cover most, if not all, of the one-time costs required to enable necessary maintenance upgrades required to host these tenants. Think of the financing to that of seeking a mortgage to repair an existing owned house which has a long term revenue stream from multiple tenants.

So is the Bateman situation a mountain or a molehill? Share your answers to the two questions above by adding a comment to this article.

When Jeremy Skinner sent this in we weren’t sure if it was a good idea – then thought that it might be a good idea to let the readers ask the questions and see how other readers respond.

Take it as one of our engagement initiatives.  We will work with what comes in and send it along to Council members.

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Citizens celebrate the Queen's Platinum Anniversary 70 years as Monarch

By Pepper Parr

June 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

At precisely 2:00 pm Thursday afternoon while citizens across the province were casting ballots Town Criers across the Commonwealth read the Royal Proclamation celebrating the Queen.

Queen Elizabeth’s anniversary of her seventy years on the throne was celebrated in Burlington.

David Vollick – Burlington’s Town Crier

The Town Crier, Dave Vollock, read his Proclamation in Civic Square to a “throng”  of people assembled there.

Ladies were each given a “fascinator” they could wear

Festivities continued at the Central Library where a display of the Queen’s hats was set up.  Now these were not the actual hats worn by Queen Elizabeth – but a collection of millinery very similar to what our head of state wears on her head.

Visitors who had RSVP’d ahead were treated to a tea – in a REAL porcelain teacup, along with tasty cake.

Ladies were each given a “fascinator” they could wear in their hair for the occasion. And a QEII 7O pin.

The Queen had her Silver Jubilee back in 1977 after just 25 years on the throne, and at that time, Burlington recognized the occasion with a brass marker on the King Edward VII Fountain at Veteran Square at City Hall.

That fountain (just restored last year) was festooned with Union Jacks for the day.

Some people are not excited about such an event, but our sovereign is a remarkable woman, and congratulations to her for her life’s work, after these long seven decades.

 

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