Joan Gibb 'I got the first hug. It was smelly, mind you'. She convinced Terry to change the route of his Run: Joan Gibb

terry-fox-running-across-from-monument

Terry Fox running along LAkeshore Road in Burlington, July 13th, 1981

The Terry Fox Run for Cancer Research, an annual event in Burlington since 1981, won’t take place this year in its usual form. The physical distancing rules due to the COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t permit large gatherings. And Terry Fox events are very large gatherings

This isn’t just in Burlington, but runs across the country. Volunteers from this outstanding community have worked hard for 39 years to grow the event to the point where it has raised $2.2 million for cancer research.

They were not prepared to just let the event dribble away – it was going to take more than a pandemic to close them down.

After the Foundation announced that the 40th Terry Fox Run would be a virtual event, the Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee decided to take a creative approach to informing the community and telling parts of the unknown story.

Profiles of the people who got the event to where it is today appear on the Terry Fox Lives in Burlington blog and are being republished by the Gazette with permission.

By Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee

July 11th, 2020,

BURLINGTON, ON
Joan Gibb
While Joan’s story focuses on Oakville, Ontario, she was part of the bigger picture. Before there was a Terry Fox Foundation, Terry Fox was collecting donations through the Canadian Cancer Society, due to the fact that they represented all types of cancer. In 1980, the beginning of Terry’s run was rocky. Not everyone understood the magnitude of what this young man from British Columbia was trying to accomplish, and his donation numbers reflected that.

Gibbs front page Beaver

Joan Gibb with a front age from the Oakville Beaver and a photograph of Terry Fox in the background.

Terry’s original plan was to take the Transcanada highway the entire time – from Newfoundland to BC. This would have meant that his run through Ontario would have mainly been in the sparsely populated northern regions. Through my conversation with Joan Gibb, I learned that the Canadian Cancer Society knew that skipping Southern Ontario would be a missed opportunity to raise some serious dollars for the cause.

Joan, having been a longtime grassroots organizer with local Canadian Cancer Society offices (first in Montreal, and later in Oakville) and an employee with Bell Canada, was asked to join the national board. Her involvement with Terry began when she was one of only six national board members who stepped up to help out with the GTA grassroots volunteers should Terry make it to Ontario.

During our chat, Joan made sure she mentioned the name Harry Rowlands, Executive Director and Ontario Chair of the Canadian Cancer Society in relation to Terry’s Marathon of Hope, along with Barbara Kilbert. He was instrumental in getting Terry to change his mind and go off course to include parts of Southern Ontario in the run. He flew to the Maritimes to connect with Terry, and brought with him a young man – Bill Vigars. Bill joined Terry in the van and was not only a liaison between the Cancer Society and Terry, but became a good friend and confidant.

“We showed him [Terry] how much we make in Ontario,” recalls Joan, “…he changed his mind. That’s a huge part of the story.”

It is a huge part of the story, because without Harry Rowlands, Barbara Kilbert, Bill Vigars and board members like Joan Gibb, Terry might not have come to the GTA.

Our Chair, Craig Gardner, reached out to Bill Vigars to let him know about our conversation with Joan and Bill was delighted to hear her name.

“We spent so much time working together,” explained Vigars. “She played a major role in influencing the Society to get behind Terry. She was amazing.”

For Burlingtonians, July 13, 1980, was the day Terry ran through our city. It was also the day he ran through neighbouring Oakville. Joan filled me in on what it was like leading up to this day and what happened on the day.

Oakville cancer cheque

Note how the amount of the cheque climbed – $113,000 an impressive number for 1980.

For starters, the Canadian Cancer Society had trouble securing volunteers. Terry’s run through the area happened during the height of summer, when many people were away on holiday. Joan knew there were going to be gaps along the route. None the less, she took on the task of organizing something in her hometown of Oakville.

In 1980, no one had cellphones. This made it harder to coordinate meet-ups, photo ops and accommodations. With a big novelty cheque ready to go, Joan set out to find a place for Terry to greet the community.

Joan ran around trying to gather the media and get a crowd to one spot to greet Terry. The only way she could communicate with the van was through a radio, which is how she learned how far along Terry was in his run. And after all that work, she was rewarded with a memorable greeting.

“I got the first hug. It was smelly, mind you,” recalled Joan.

To remedy the situation Joan had arranged for a cold hotel room where he could shower, and dinner was arranged for that evening. Joan, Terry, the team from the van, some Cancer Society members and a young woman who had given Terry a rose earlier that week dined together.

Gibbs presenting cheque

Terry Fox accepting a cheque from Joan Gibb

The next morning, Terry woke up early to leave Oakville. It was here that a photographer for an Oakville newspaper snapped an iconic image of Terry running at dawn, back-lit by his police escort’s headlights. That photograph went on to win national awards. Joan Gibb is fortunate enough to have an original copy of it.

Message of Hope
To conclude our conversation, we asked Joan to share some words of inspiration for those of us struggling with how we will raise funds this year under such strange circumstances. Her message was simple…think of Terry.

Joan expressed that she’s never been one to say she can’t do something – but since Terry has become such an integral part of her life, she acknowledged that his message has been a guiding force.

If Joan could organize a Terry Fox event in 1980 with little technology and few volunteers, surely we can succeed with all the tools we have available to us today. When it feels hard, think of Terry.

Thank you, Joan for sharing your story with us.
Photographs provided by Joan Gibb from her private collection

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The Beachway will be the place to be - but it can only accommodate so many people

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 10th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

In her newsletter A Better Burlington, Mayor Marianne Meed Ward praises that jewel of a beach iin the Bechway part of the city – and then warns people of the traffic and parking problems.

Pay attention – she is trying to help.

“As the hot summer temperatures continue, the City of Burlington is reminding residents and visitors of some of the ways they can stay cool while continuing to protect the health and safety of the community and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

Beach aerial

It is an incredible stretch of sandy beach – it will be busy and there isn’t enough parking.

“Burlington’s beautiful waterfront at Beachway Park is a popular destination when temperatures are high, however, visitors to the beach are reminded:

“ The City of Burlington continues to be in a state of emergency due to COVID-19. Please continue to respect physical distancing measures at all times

“ Keep two metres away from others (e.g. the length of a hockey stick) sitting on the beach and in the water

Gather in groups of no more than 10 people who are part of your social circle

Move to the right on the Waterfront trail to make room for others to pass safely.

“The City will be taking some additional measures to educate residents and control parking around the Beachway. City of Burlington Park Ambassadors and Parking Enforcement Staff will also be in the vicinity to assist with these measures.

Additional signs will be placed informing visitors of:

Parking - municipal cash grab

He’s doing his job – probably grateful you gave it to him.

No parking zones, tow away zones
Cost of parking tickets on signs (where possible)
“Parking lot full” signs at street entrances
Physical distancing signs at more locations.

“Parking spaces at Beachway Park are limited and the lot fills quickly. Visitors are reminded to:

“Consider coming back another time if the parking lot is full, or parking their vehicle in an alternative location where parking is permitted and space exists on the beach to ensure physical distancing

Avoid parking illegally – City bylaw officers will be enforcing ticketing and towing to discourage overcrowding at the beach.

Outdoor Pools and Spray Pads

Splash pad LaSalle - swimming

Wading pool at LaSalle Park will be packed. Don’t hog the available time in the water

Beginning Saturday, July 11, the outdoor pools at Mountainside Park and Nelson Park will be open for lap and leisure swims. Spray pads throughout the city and the LaSalle wading pool are also open, since July 4.

In following provincial guidelines on the safe reopening of pools, online registration and pre-payment is required and available for Burlington residents only. No walk-ins are accepted at this time. To create an account and/or register, go to liveandplay.burlington.ca.

In addition to pre-registration, the number of swimmers allowed in each pool will be restricted to ensure physical distancing. Time-limits will also be in place to allow more people to enjoy the pools and for staff to disinfect the area for the next group of swimmers.

Important note for parking at Nelson Pool: Visitors registered to swim at Nelson Pool should note the parking lot is closed for paving and will reopen upon completion. Pool patrons are asked to park at the Pauline Johnson Public School parking lot at 4350 Longmoor Dr., access off Longmoor Drive.

Cooling Centre

Extended heat warnings are issued by Halton Region when forecast temperatures are expected to be at least 31°C and overnight temperatures are above 20°C for at least three days, or the humidex is at least 40°C for a minimum of three days.

During COVID-19, when an extended heat warning is issued, the City will open a cooling centre in the auditorium in Central Arena, located at 519 Drury Lane, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Community members can use the facility for one-hour increments and will be screened for COVID-19 when they arrive. Measures will be in place to ensure physical distancing and visitors are encouraged to wear a non-medical face covering. Please stay home if you are ill and always practice physical distancing (2m).

Meed Ward - tight head shot

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward

“Our Beachway Park is a gem in Burlington and a destination not just for our community but others across the GTHA. While we look for ways to cool down during these hot summer days, we need to remember we are still in a pandemic and COVID-19 is still very much a part of our lives.

I’m grateful to our City staff for putting together so quickly a strategy to mitigate overcrowding at our beach and illegal parking, while encouraging everyone heading down there to follow safety and health guidelines. Our beach can be a great escape during these tough times – let’s ensure everyone who uses it has a positive experience.

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Now that we are really politically correct do we take the Joseph Brant name off the hospital and never erect a statute in his name?

opinionred 100x100By Joseph A Gaetan

July 10th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Christopher Columbus, Abraham Lincoln, Sir Winston Churchill, Sir John A MacDonald, Henry Dundas-1st Viscount, Peter Russell, Hector Louis Langevin, Joseph Brant and Samuel Hatt, all have something in common, all were honoured in some way, some with statues, some by having cities, museums, hospitals, streets, or schools named after them.

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Joseph Brant portrait by George Romney

What these people, all men, also have in common is their names are being removed from their statues, either defaced or torn down. The reason, something in their past is so abhorrent today that ancestors of the recipients of their misdeeds feel the mere presence of them and their acts in history are now toxic beyond repair or forgiveness. As decades and centuries passed, the memory of their names lived on, while their deeds – both good and bad – were mostly forgotten today and they are being erased from history.

Years ago, I visited the Arizona Memorial and had no idea what to expect. Today, I still consider it amongst the most moving experiences in my life and no words can do justice to the experience and deep feelings that arose while standing over the Arizona and the 1102 sailors and marines entombed beneath.

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Women in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp

The Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial also stands today as a reminder of the atrocities that occurred between 1940 and 1945. About 1.1 million innocent men, women and children were gassed and then cremated at Auschwitz-Birkenau. The death toll from Auschwitz alone includes 960,000 Jews (865,000 of whom were gassed on arrival), 74,000 non-Jewish Poles, 21,000 Roma, 15,000 Soviet prisoners of war, and up to 15,000 other Europeans. Hitlers “Final Solution” resulted in millions more being exterminated in his death camps, while many politicians across the world ignored what was happening.

According to the Canadian Encyclopedia, a local hero, Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) was born in 1742, on the banks of the Ohio River. Brant was a Mohawk Indian chief who served as a spokesman for his people, as a Christian missionary, and a British military officer during the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) and the American Revolution (1775-1783). He was an influential military captain and a powerful diplomat who encouraged Indigenous tribes to share his political loyalties. During the American Revolution, “Brant fought throughout the war with an Indigenous-Loyalist band”, he also, “worked to form the Western Confederacy, a united group of Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) and western Indigenous peoples, created to block American expansion westward”.

Brant was always pretty good at getting grants from the British, but this Council probably isn’t going to hear his argument.

Joseph Brant often wore colourful costume, especially when he was at the Royal Courts in England.

From 1776 to his death in 1807, “Brant fought in vain with the British and Upper Canada governments for the rights of his people to obtain title to the lands of the Grand River Valley”. The African American Registry also claims “[the] slaves he captured during the American Revolution built the Brant House at Burlington Beach and a second home near Brantford. In all, Brant owned about forty African slaves”.
A 2009 Star article and a 2017 Spec article both identify Brant as a slave owner. In his article, Andrew Dreschel posed the question, “Is slave owner Joseph Brant next?” His article also asks, “why stop there if we’re reassessing the past by today’s ethical standards?”. Dreschel also queries whether other effigies are being torn down, “to help expunge the sins of the past”? According to Dreschel, “one can find a Joseph Brant statue in the city of Brantford, and a life sized one in Ottawa, part of the Valiants Memorial commemorating important Canadian military figures”.

Dreschel goes on to state, “Brant was not the only slave owner in early Upper Canada … Historian Alan Taylor estimates the colony had about 300 slaves at that time, mostly taken from rebel settlements during the American Revolution by Indians and loyalist Raiders”, adding, “we would certainly need to change the names of countless schools including Earl Kitchener Elementary School in West Hamilton named after [the] Imperial British general whose ruthlessness included using concentration camps during the Boer War in South Africa”.

An architects rendering of the new entrance to the Joseph Brant Hospital whch will now face the lake. The entrance will be off LAkeshore Road with the new parking lot just to the west of the hospital.

A rendering of the entrance to the Joseph Brant Hospital.  Do we take the Brant off the building?

 

In addition to the above the City of Burlington is home to a street named Brant, the Joseph Brant Museum, and the Joseph Brant Hospital.

In an article entitled, “The life of Sophia Pooley and the Queen’s Bush Settlement”, Carly Holmstead, Kayla Hefford, and Jennifer Williams write, “At the age of five, Sophia and her sister were taken to Niagara Falls, where they were sold to Mohawk chieftain Joseph Brant”. After several years on the reserve, Brant sold Sophia to Samuel Hatt: “at twelve years old, I was sold by Brant to an Englishman in Ancaster, for one hundred dollars, – his name was Samuel Hatt, and I lived with him seven year”. To add insult to injury the article also states, “During the time Sophia was enslaved by Samuel Hatt, legislations had passed marking the end of slavery; unbeknownst to Sophia, she continued to live under the confines of slavery”.

Brant Museum transformed

The name can’t be taken off the museum – or could it be called a home from a particular period of time?

Sadly, slavery is alive, well and flourishing. According to the 2018 Global Slavery Index, approximately 45.8 million people worldwide are in some form of modern slavery. About 17 percent of the total number of people in modern slavery live where there is limited, if any, government action. These countries are characterised by government complicity (North Korea and Eritrea), low levels of political will (Iran), high levels of corruption (Equatorial Guinea), or widespread conflict (Libya). Few victims are being identified and there are even fewer prosecutions. According to the GSI, Canada is amongst the 12 G20 countries not taking action to stop the importation of goods and services that are at risk from being produced by forced labour.

Golda Meir

Golda Meir: she was elected Prime Minister of Israel in 1969.

Golda Meir once said, “One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present”. The Arizona Memorial, Auschwitz and locally Joe Brant are still here to remind us and the world of the “day of infamy”, the “Holocaust”, and of a Mohawk Indian chief who served not only as a spokesman for his people but also as a Christian missionary and a British military officer during two major 18th century conflicts. Applying the “cancel culture” to Joe Brant’s honours would serve little while leaving the remnants of his legacy intact could serve as a model for recollection and reconciliation.

Joseph A Gaetan B.G.S, the author, was born during a time when Italo-Canadians were not treated kindly by some citizens and the government of Canada.

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Beachway parking problem has resulted in much stronger enforcement and some pretty stiff fines.

News 100 greenBy Pepper Parr

July 9th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was a full day’s work for members of city council today – they began at 9:30 and were at it up until just before six pm with a break for some lunch.

They met as a Standing Committee then got serious and met as a council.

We got a look at what the pandemic is costing us – on paper it comes to $18 million – in reality the city finance department has to find $4 million, give or take some change.

The Mayor seemed wedded to that $18 million number.  The full finance picture is a seperate story.

The stinker is the situation at the Beachway where fines of $250 are going to be handed out for those who park where cars aren’t supposed to park.

There is going to be additional signage; there will be additional staff on hand.  A motion was passed at the City Council meeting – held at the close of the Standing Committee meeting making it all legal.

The problems is – few will know what took place – the city might get some media out and while the Gazette has a large, very large readership – all of the Burlington market area isn’t a regular reader – yet.

During the debate on the Beachway parking problem we learned that the Parks and Recreation department doesn’t know how many parking spots there are – nor does it appear to know just how many people the Beach can accommodate – COVID or pre-COVID.  No one has done any counting or measuring.

Council came close to forgetting to make the plans for managing parking illegal. City Manager Tim Commisso spotted the error, brought it to the attention of the Chair who went through some procedural issues and resolved that issue.

Park your car in the wrong place and you will be giving the city a lot of your money.

The city has come to realize that the Beachway is getting to be as popular as it was several decades ago.

Beach with canal bride

Recent crowds at the western end of the Beachway.

Recently the crowds near the western end were very thick. Compare our news photography with the way it was 30 years ago when a railway line ran along the edge of the lake.

Parks and Recreation decided to take a long term look and decided that some way had to be found to manage the vehicle traffoic and approved the following Staff Direction.

Chris 7

Not certain how Burlingtonians will take to making reservations and then paying to park.

During the debate it was suggested that Burlingtonians would pay a lesser fee.

A lot of people are going to show up and be told that there is no room for them to park and be turned away.

The initiative for finding a way to limit parking in public parks came from Conservation Halton where the problem was not just the number of people visiting the Conservation parks but the need for more in the way of income.

The City doesn’t seem to go after more revenue – at least not yet.

 

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The story behind how Burlington welcomed Terry Fox in 1980 - First in a series.

terry-fox-running-across-from-monument

Terry Fox as he passed through Burlington on July 13th, 1980.

The Terry Fox Run for Cancer Research, an annual event in Burlington since 1981, won’t take place this year in its usual form. The physical distancing rules due to the COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t permit large gatherings. And Terry Fox events are very large gatherings

This isn’t just in Burlington, but runs across the country. Volunteers from this outstanding community have worked hard for 39 years to grow the event to the point where it has raised $2.2 million for cancer research.

They were not prepared to just let the event dribble away – it was going to take more than a pandemic to close them down.

After the Foundation announced that the 40th Terry Fox Run would be a virtual event, the Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee decided to take a creative approach to informing the community and telling parts of the unknown story.

Profiles of the people who got the event to where it is today appear on the Terry Fox Lives in Burlington blog and are being republished by the Gazette with permission.

By Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee

July 9th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

Greg Pace
While we all know that the first Terry Fox Run was the Marathon of Hope – Terry Fox’s heroic, but shortened run across Canada for Cancer Research in 1980, but the first run as we know it today actually happened in 1981.

Terry Fox sadly passed away from cancer on June 28, 1981. Canadians were heartbroken. At this time communities across the country were organizing smaller runs for September of that year. Greg Pace, an athletic 20-something Burlingtonian, approached the Canadian Cancer Society (the Terry Fox Foundation was not yet established) about being the race director for Burlington’s first community run.

Greg running

Greg Pace – that surname is on the right man.

Greg, who has plenty of race director credits under his belt today, had little experience in 1981, but had a love for running and was inspired by the cause.

While our run has happened on the waterfront for many years now (Beachway Park and Spencer Smith Park), the 1981 run was a 10 km route in and around Sherwood Forest Park. Today’s Sherwood Forest Park is dotted with ball diamonds, soccer fields and groomed grounds, however, it wasn’t that well-developed in the early 80s.

Greg recalls one participant completing the course in her wheelchair.

“I remember seeing her do that little ravine through the mud in her wheelchair…it was one of those huge motivating things…I saw her try to back her wheelchair up a hill. There wasn’t a dry eye in the place, because obviously she was the last finisher.”

We continue to see people of all ages and abilities participate in the Terry Fox Run to this day.
Beyond 1981

Greg stayed on as Race Director/Chair for several more years. The first three years were held at Sherwood park with the 10k route. It then moved to Downtown Burlington near City Hall. Greg recalls that this was a 5k loop.

flyer

This is what flyers used to look like – Adobe software didn’t exist then. Mimeograph machines were what we used.

The first year, in 1981, the run was organized by Greg Pace and a few of his friends. It eventually evolved into a committee, which is how the runs are organized today. Greg was lucky to get to work with some very interesting people during his time as chair. From a local phys. ed teacher to local fundraising gurus – Greg had a diverse and experienced team behind him. His core committee included Chris Dooley, Fran Agnew and Margaret MacVinnie.

As the team got stronger, Greg was ready to let go of the reins.

“After the fourth or fifth year we gave it up and actually tried to recruit some people to take it over. The person that we recruited…about a month prior to it [the run] just said, ‘yeah, I’m not interested in doing it,’ so we had to scramble.”  Greg Pace and his committee organized a couple more runs after that before handing it over to Burt McGrath.

Message of Hope
“Keep him in mind.”
– Greg Pace

I asked Greg for words of inspiration to help our community stay motivated for the cause during these difficult times. His message was simple. Keep Terry in mind.

He also said that if everyone whose life has been touched by cancer did something – raised a dollar or more – it would make a difference.

gregpace with someone

Greg Pace out on a regular run with a colleague.

It’s important to keep all those spirits alive. So, whatever you do, whether it’s a 5k walk or run, writing an inspiring message in chalk on your driveway or hosting a virtual party, do it with Terry Fox in mind.

Though Greg stays behind the scenes these days, he’s still a big supporter of the foundation and our local Burlington run. Thank you for taking the time to chat with us and sharing your stories and experiences.

Photographs and clippings provided by Greg Pace from his private collection, donated to the Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee

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Ward Councillor and Mayor sponsoring a motion that will require people to wear face masks

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

July 7th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Sit down for this one.

At a meeting on Thursday Council is going to consider the following motion. It contains seven Whereas’s.

The essence of the motion that is sponsored by ward 4 Councillor Shawna Stolte and Mayor Marianne Meed Ward is for Council to enact a temporary bylaw requiring individuals, organizations or corporations that are responsible for the operation of a facility or business, which have indoor, enclosed spaces open to the public, to ensure no member of the public is permitted unless wearing a mask or face covering in a manner which covers their mouth, nose and chin, subject to the exemptions below, to help limit the spread of COVID-19

The movers of the motion also want the city to spend up to $10,000 to cover the cost of free masks to those who cannot afford one.

MMW + SS heads

The movers of a motion to make face masks mandatory in public places

The complete motion is set out below. It is, at this point, just a motion. It has to be debated and voted upon and then sent to a meeting of city council on the 13th where it will have to be approved.

Recommendation:
1. Council approve the following motion:

WHEREAS the spread of COVID-19 has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, the City of Burlington has declared a State of Emergency, and the province remains under emergency orders due to the health risks to Ontario residents arising from COVID-19; and

WHEREAS COVID-19 continues to be present within the City of Burlington and surrounding municipalities, and is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person, even with minimal or no signs of symptoms or illness, and carrying a risk of serious complications such as pneumonia or respiratory failure, mulitiple organ failure, kidney failure, liver failure, neurological complications, and may result in death; and

WHEREAS there is a growing body of evidence on the effectiveness of masks and face coverings to act as a barrier to prevent the spread of COVID-19; and

WHEREAS the wearing of masks and face coverings may act as an ongoing visual clue and reminder that public health measures, including hand-washing and maintaining a safe physical distance from others, are still required, that the COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing and that a resurgence of local disease activity remains an ongoing threat; and

WHEREAS the Province of Ontario has enacted O. Reg.263/20 (Stage 2 Closures) under Subsection 7.0.2 (4) of Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act to permit certain businesses to reopen for attendance by members of the public subject to conditions, including the advice, recommendations and instructions of public health officials; and

WHEREAS physical distancing can be difficult to maintain in enclosed, indoor spaces open to the public; and

WHEREAS the City of Burlington wants to be prepared for the eventual Stage 3 reopenings under the provincial Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, and use every tool available to protect residents from a resurgence of COVID-19.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Burlington City Council enact a temporary bylaw requiring individuals, organizations or corporations that are responsible for the operation of a facility or business, which have indoor, enclosed spaces open to the public, to ensure no member of the public is permitted unless wearing a mask or face covering in a manner which covers their mouth, nose and chin, subject to the exemptions below, to help limit the spread of COVID-19; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the operator of such facilities or businesses that are open to the public, shall conspicuously post at all entrances to the facility or business clearly visible signage outlining the requirements and exemptions of this bylaw; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that members of the public attending facilities or businesses that are open to the public shall wear a mask or face covering in a manner which covers their mouth, nose and chin, subject to the exemptions below, and unless it is reasonably required to temporarily remove the covering to access services provided by the establishment, or while actively engaging in an athletic or fitness acuity during physical activity, and exemptions may be accommodated if:

a. The person is under three years of age.
b. The person has an underlying medical condition or developmental disability which inhibits their ability to wear a mask or face covering, or other physical disability whereby the wearing of a mask or face covering would limit their ability to reasonably communicate with others.
c. Wearing a face covering would inhibit the person’s ability to breathe in any way.
d. The person is unable to place or remove a mask or face covering without assistance.
e. Employees and agents of the person responsible for the establishment are within an area designated for them and not for public access, or within or behind a physical barrier.
f. Staff identify any other such exemptions that may be advisable.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that employees working with members of the public in an enclosed, indoor space must also wear a mask or face covering, unless they are in an area not for public access, or they meet one of the exemptions; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that employees or members of the public shall not be required to provide proof of any of the exemptions set out herein; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the bylaw apply to all City of Burlington indoor facilities open to the public such as community centres, city hall, libraries, art gallery, performing arts centre, and public transit; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the bylaw be in force for a temporary period of time, beginning July 20 and expiring September 30, 2020, unless extended or revoked by City Council; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Executive Director of Legal Services & Corporation Counsel be directed to prepare the necessary bylaw for consideration by City Council on July 13, 2020; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Director of Corporate Communications & Government Relations be directed to develop a communications campaign during the first month the bylaw comes into force and effect to assist residents and businesses to understand the bylaw and exemptions, assist with voluntary compliance, and where people can acquire masks; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that council request that the Region of Halton present a mandatory mask bylaw for consideration by Regional Council at its meeting of July 15, 2020 to ensure consistency across the region; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that council request the Province of Ontario to enact a mandatory mask order under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act for those regions that have entered Stage 2 reopening, and/or will enter Stage 3 reopening; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that council request the Government of Canada to enact a mandatory mask policy; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this report be circulated to the Region of Halton, Towns of Halton Hills, Oakville and Milton, all Halton Members of Provincial Parliament, Members of Parliament, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, and the Association of Municipalities of Ontario.

2. Direct the Chief Financial Officer to establish an initial grant of $10,000 to provide non-medical masks free of charge for community members who lack the financial means to purchase them, via application and submission of receipts, funded from the city’s COVID-19 account, and direct the City Manager’s Office to report back to the August 13, 2020 Corporate Services, Strategy, Risk and Accountability Committee on a plan for providing masks to in-need community members including such additional options as:

a. seeking a sponsor to fund or procure/provide masks that would be supplied free of charge to the public, with the sponsor and/or city logo displayed on the mask, and distributed by the city or through the sponsor;

b. issuing a request for proposals to local businesses to provide a quote on the cost to supply the city with masks that can be distributed to the public, either by the city or by the business, then billed to the city;

c. purchasing masks that can be distributed to members of the public, on a request basis, or made available at the entry to city facilities, once opened;

d. providing grant funding to residents to purchase their own mask, subject to quantity and cost limitations, and an application process;

e. other options as they may arise.

3. Direct the City Manager to report back to the August 13, 2020 Corporate Services, Strategy, Risk and Accountability Committee on potential grant funding for businesses and commercial establishments to assist with the cost of signage and masks as mandated by this bylaw, retroactive to the effective in-force date of the bylaw, subject to appropriate criteria.

4. That City Council seek matching funding from Halton Region at 50% or more of total costs to implement assistance to residents and businesses, given the Region’s role in health care delivery, social service delivery and business supports.

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Terry Fox run, usually held in September is going to go virtual in July and August

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 6th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We live at a time when almost everything is virtual.

It’s an odd feeling.

How do you respond to something that is virtual? Where is the human element?

terry-fox-running-across-from-monument

Terry Fox running through Burlington in xx of 1980. The monument commemorating that event is right across Lakeshore Road

Forty years ago Terry Fox ran along Lakeshore Road in his Marathon of Hope that ended in Thunder Bay on September 1st, 1980 after 143 days on the road covering 3582 km.

He died the following year 1981, on June 28th. ,

Since then communities across the country have been celebrating what Terry managed to get done in his short life.

The Terry Fox Run for Cancer always took place in September. The Fox Foundation decided that there would not be a Run this September due to the pandemic and the need to exercise serious discipline when it comes to huge numbers of people participating in an event.

Fox monument with Brant Inn

Burlington may be the only city in the country with a monument like this.

The Burlington Terry Fox event didn’t was to miss a year – and it didn’t want to walk away from that 40th anniversary.

Terry ran through Burlington on July 13, 1980.  The city is expected to raise the Terry Fox flag that day.

Craig Gardner Terry Fox

Craig Gardner: “We had to get creative.

The Gazette asked Craig Gardner how long has he been heading up the annual Terry Fox event in Burlington.

“I have been the chair now for five years now; I was on the committee for 5 years before that and a volunteer for 5 years before that. So I have been involved now for 15 years. The first run was in September of 1981 at Sherwood Forest Park.

“After 2 years it moved to city hall for almost 20 years, then to Beachway Park Pavilion for 14 years. The year I became chair is when we moved everything to the east end of Spencer Smith Park by the Waterfront Hotel. Hopefully we will be back there in 2021.

“After 39 runs we have raised almost $2.2 million for cancer research by over 24,000 participants and in addition the Burlington school runs have raised an additional $2 million plus.

“Now with no event we had to get creative – we looked at some pretty radical ideas. We are hoping that the social distancing rules are lightened up a bit and people will feel safer getting out and doing their own thing for the Run.

“The Terry Fox Foundation is expected to approve some ideas that have not been done before by anyone. Much like last year when we became the first local Terry Fox organization to apply for and get a Canada summer jobs grant to hire a student. We did the same this year as did three other run sites.

What are some of those ideas?

“Locally my committee took the 2019 participant data base and divided it up amongst themselves and we will be emailing or calling as many of the folks from last year (who gave us permission) as we can to tell them there is a 2020 40th anniversary event or events. We will describe it to them to ensure we follow COVID-19 rules.

“There are other ideas I can’t talk about yet – need to get possible participants fully onside.  The ideas I can talk about are really ideas we are passing along to our teams when we call/email. This year anything goals and depending on Covid-19 numbers allowed we suggested things like pool parties, cocktail parties, BBQ’s sidewalk chalking, skateboard.

EAch of these woman had their own reasons for running this race and each ran it in their own way. Hundreds did just this during the Terry Fox Run for cancer research

Each of these woman had their own reasons for running this race and each ran it in their own way. Hundreds did just this during the Terry Fox Run for cancer research. This was in 2012

“As I say in 2020 anything goes – we are just ask people to register and collect donations from sponsors or donate themselves. We had arranged for a date to collect donations at all LCBO in Burlington, but we are not sure if that will fly –  it is scheduled for mid-August.

Terry Fox flag

Truer words were never said: Will the community continue its support even if it takes place virtually.

Craig Gardner explains: “We will start our promotion of the event after the July 13th Council meeting – he want be able to delegate but expects Councillor Bentivegna to speak to the event.  City Hall is expected to hoist the Terry Fox flag in September.

“We plan to reach out personally to as many Teams and individuals as we can from last year’s run to see if they want to participate in this year’s virtual event.

“Virtual in this case means doing whatever you like whenever you like wherever you like to raise money for cancer research as long as Covid-19 rules in place are followed by each event.

“We have seen this year’s 40th anniversary shirt designed by a Foxer in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan (he won a contest with 1600 entries that the Fox family reviewed each of to decide the winner).

“With the big Spencer Smith Park run scheduled for September 20th is cancelled, we are asking people to register online either individually or as part of a team and send their personalized url to family and friends to donate.

Register online at https://www.terryfox.ca/terryfoxrun/burlington-on

The Burlington Terry Fox Run for Cancer people managed to get funding to hire a summer intern through the Canada Summer Jobs grant.

“The student we have is amazing. She has already gone through our data for each channel(Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) determining demographics of our audience, best time and day to post things, what things get the most hits. She is in the process of creating a calendar of postings. We have a lot of information to pull from with The BLOG, Terry Fox foundation and the Terry Fox Research Institute as well as information we have gathered thru filmed visits to cancer research labs at McMaster.

“One of my committee members has started a new blog this year. She is interviewing people associated with Terry in Burlington from the first run chair in Sept 1981 till present. There will also be blogs entries pre-dating the first run of when Terry actually ran through Burlington July 13, 1980. The plan is to post one new entry per week and share it to our various social media channels.

https://terryfoxburlington.wordpress.com/   The Gazette will carry those blogs.

Why did the Fox Foundation come to the decision there wouldn’t be a Run this year?

“As I understand it with hundreds and hundreds of run sites not only in Canada but global it is not easy to turn this ship on a dime and so not knowing what conditions would be like in September in all locations it was decided to make an early call and have everyone focus on the new way for this year. With some many businesses shut for extended periods it has been a challenge to get promotional materials even our iconic shirts are later than normal due to the pandemic.

Terry Fox runners

The event has always been heavily attended.

“What are your hopes for this year?

“I would love to see everyone who has participated in any of the 39 previous years of first timers to get outside sometime over summer or September and do something for Terry and for themselves.

“Go for a walk, a hike, whatever works for you and donate yourself, get your friends and family to donate. Last year we came within $6,000 of our all-time record from 2005 – I would love to see the people of Burlington fight through the adversity of Covid-a9 and somehow manage to make the 40th anniversary the biggest year ever in Burlington and raise $130K.

T shirts sales are going well. We are selling them online from our Facebook page. We normally sell 100 or so in a good year and so far have sold almost 30 in the last few days.

What comes next?

“Hopefully a new normal will allow us to get back in our regular spot by the Waterfront Hotel at the east end of Spencer Smith Park with a bigger, better event than we have ever had. Sunday September 19, 2021 mark your calendars now.

If you have any questions about Terry Fox Run 2020 please contact Gardner at 905-599-8621 or scraiggardner@sympatico.ca

 

 

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The pools will be open - you will need to wade through a lot of bureaucracy to register. Open ONLY to Burlington residents

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 3rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Summer is in full force.

The pools are open – well at least most of them.

LaSalle Pool Opening July 4; Mountainside and Nelson Outdoor Pools Opening July 11

The opening dates are a little earlier than Parks and Recreation expected; they will be open for lap and leisure swims.

No snow? There are always swimming pools. Check out the available programs and register for a spot.

Swimming pools are open. Check out the available programs and register for a spot.

This isn’t however going to be a normal summer. While things look good on the surface there is amongst us a virus that can’t wait to jump from someone who has COVID19 to someone who doesn’t.

This virus is passed from person to person.

The Provincial Guidelines on the safe reopening of pools means pool access will now be done through online registration and pre-payment for Burlington residents only.

There will be no walk-in pool access accepted at this time. To create an account CLICK HERE  t

To help ensure physical distancing, the number of swimmers allowed in each pool will be restricted. Time-limits will also be in place to allow more people to enjoy the pools and for staff to disinfect the area for the next group of swimmers.

To view the programs and times: Click Here ,

Residents will have an opportunity to register no more than 25-hours before the start of the program. Residents are asked to book only one swim per day to help accommodate as many swimmers as possible and to complete a health screening questionnaire.

Nelson swimming pool

Nelson pool

New Procedures at the Pools
The health and safety of Burlington residents is of the upmost importance. In compliance with the Provincial Guidelines for opening aquatic facilities and for the health and safety of all guests, the following standards will be in effect:

Bring proof of registration to the pool
• Enter the pool using only the entry point; exit the pool using only the exit point at the opposite end of the pool
• Outdoor showers will be available for use before entering and re-entering the pool
• Use of changerooms is limited to washroom use only; guests should arrive wearing swimming attire and to change and shower at home afterward

• On-deck viewing is not available
• Physical distance of 2m (6ft) must always be maintained; within the pool and on the pool deck
• Guests will be asked to exit the deck area without delay after each swim to allow for cleaning and disinfection before the next swim
• Guests are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs as use of deck furniture will be restricted
• Guests are encouraged to bring their own filled plastic water bottles – water fountains will not be available;
• All play equipment will not be in use, including splash features, diving boards, climbing wall, and waterslide
• Regular supervision requirements apply. Visit burlington.ca/playstandards

Lap Swimming
The pools will be divided into double lanes. Registered swimmers are to swim clockwise on the black line of one lane and come back on the black line of the next lane, forming a loop.

Leisure Swims
To help support physical distancing,

Mountainside and Nelson Pools will be divided into shallow, middle and deep areas.

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Food Bank experineced some startling growth in the number of people needing help with basic food items.

News 100 blueBy Robin Bailey

July 2nd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Food Bank is running at 70% over same time last year in terms of families served!

Domenique W Food Bank

Dominique joins those packing food hampers and does some of the longer term logistics thinking.

Sometimes as we go about serving families in Burlington we forget how well our volunteers are doing keeping up with the pace! We run our numbers monthly and having just now completed the 2nd quarter, we took some time to reflect. There has been an increase of 70% in the number of households served from March through June in comparison to the same period last year.

We don’t seem too stressed out about it because the volunteers are doing a great job meeting the needs and doing so calmly and efficiently.

If they were a private business developing a market – that would be a great number. It is a reflection on the number of people who need help.

Jane F Food Bank

Jane is a regular volunteer at the Food Bank

The community however is coming through Big Time.

And how about those Burlington Dads!

They came together online in a Canada Day challenge to raise $250 for us and ended up with a commitment of $2,825 so far – way over their expectations and much needed so thank you Burlington Dads!

If you are in need or know of someone who could use our help PLEASE have them email us at info@burlingtonfoodbank.ca or call 905-637-2273 to make arrangements to have food dropped at their door or they can now PICK IT UP. If you live in Burlington, we are here to help.

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Three trails in the city need names - Council wants to hear what you think.

News 100 greenBy Staff

July 2nd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Part two of the Trail Naming project is starting and residents can now vote for the names of three trails. Earlier this year residents were asked to submit names for the trails. More than 300 names were received.

A committee made up of City staff and members of the Burlington Cycling Advisory Committee and the Integrated Transportation Advisory Committee created a short-list of names. The entries with the most votes will be brought to City Council for approval to become the official names of the trails.

Voting on name-this-trail will be open from July 2 to July 24.  Link to voting booth is shown below.

Trail locations and name options

Trail 1

Trail # 1

Location 1: Hydro corridor trail, north of the QEW, between the North Service Road at Roly Bird Park and Berwick Drive.

• Unity Trail: A trail that connects many communities and symbolizes inclusion
• Crosstown Trail: A trail spans across most of north Burlington
• Powerline Trail: In reference to the use of the land as a hydro transmission corridor

Trail # 2

Trail # 2

Location 2: New downtown hydro corridor trail, east of Maple Avenue, between Ontario Street and Graham’s Lane

• Core Trail: Combines the double meaning of core as it relates to fitness and the location of the trail
• Old Rail Trail: Recognizes the former railway that ran through the corridor years ago
• Maple Trail: The trail is in the neighborhood commonly referred to as Maple and is close to Maple Avenue

Trail # 3

Trail # 3

Location 3: New trail east of Centennial Drive, between Upper Middle Road and Heathfield Drive (extending in the future to Mainway.)

• Palmer Trail: The trail is in the neighborhood commonly referred to as Palmer
• Washburn Trail: In reference to Halton Region’s Pump Station and Reservoir facility
• Upper Mainway Trail: References the north and south boundary of the trail between two major roads

You vote for the name you want for each trail RIGHT HERE

 

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Canada Day: People enjoyed the day in their own way - despite a pandemic that has shut down a lot of locations.

News 100 blueBy Staff

July 2, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Beach with canal bride

Western end of the Beachway – It was one of the places to be.

What did people do on Canada Day?

A lot of them took to the lake.

Those with big boats made part of the bay area a destination.

Boats

With the heat – the water seemed like the place to be.

May more took to the bars and restaurants that got creative and opened up patios.

It was a beautiful day – despite a virus out there that wants to hop from person to person like some kind of tick.

A quick look at what some people were doing.

Family blonde boy

For some it was a quiet summer day.

Sea Do

For others it was high speed all out energy.

Walking the rainbow

Was this a significant place for people to cross the street – or just another crosswalk?

What will it be folks

What’s it going to be folks?

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The Canada Day Ribfest worked - it worked very well. Kudos to the Rotarians.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

July 2nd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

They came from the north of the Burlington Centre

They came from the south of the Burlington Centre

From the north

Coming from the north – they lined up on Guelph Line patiently waiting to get into the parking lot.

From the south

They came from the south and lined up on Guelph line waiting to get into the parking lot.

It was Canada Day and hundreds of cars and trucks lined up to get into the Centre parking lot to follow what looked like an obstacle course to get to a point where they had to make a choice – which of the four Rib choices did they want.

First traffic point

The first traffic direction point. Note the line of cars on the left coming into the parking lot.

It looked like an obstacle course and it was confusing – However there were Rotarians at every point guiding traffic.

Working their way through the traffiic cones

Traffic wound its way around traffic cones – as they were guided to the point where they had to make a decision.

Cars then got to a point where the driver had to make a decision – which of the four rib choices did they want.

Four choices

There was the day’s offering. The traditional bill boards that Burlingtonians had looked at for years stood in front of them with flags flying in the wind.

The Rotarian who was on that security point was getting frazzled at times as people asked: “Which one is the best?”

“They’re all great” he replied as he worked to keep the traffic moving.

And it moved quite well.

Billy Bones or Uncle Sams

Traffic pauses to pay for their order and then into the spot where they pick up their ribs and enjoy the sweet aroma of the piping hot food that is now in their car.

Then they were in a line that got them to a point where there order was taken and paid for – they then proceeded to a pick up point on either side of the place where the ribs were being prepared.

It sounds a little convoluted, and it may have looked that way as drivers came in – but it went very smoothly.

NY city traffic

Is the the Burlington Centre parking lot. Or is it New York city?

The photographs show dozens of cars all crowded together but everyone knew where they were going.

Singer

The live entertainment was pleasant – the man knew how to work the strings of that guitar. His voice was just fine.

There was live entertainment being broadcast over the parking lot – the singer was working his guitar to the fullest and producing a sound that fit the day.

Sign of the event

It worked – it worked very well.

The Lakeshore Rotary who put on the event haven’t released any numbers yet – but it was clear to this reporter that the event made not have pulled in as much as the fill scale Ribfest has done in the past but it did very well under the circumstances.

The Rotarians are to be congratulated for being able to pivot and use Canada Day to put on their event. The Burlington Centre people deserve a “thank you” for making the space available.

The event could become an annual thing. It certainly worked on July 1st, 2020

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Congratulations - you are now Canadian citizens

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

July 1st, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Canada Day is a good time to think about Citizenship.

Those of us born in Canada take it for granted and for the most part we are grateful that we live in this country.

For many – they choose to become Canadian citizens.

When that choice is made these people take part in a Citizenship Ceremony that is presided over by a Citizenship Court Judge.

The federal government often calls upon members of the Order of Canada to take on the task for what is a rather short ceremony that has one sentence that matters: Congratulations, you are now Canadian citizens.

Ron Foxcroft was made a member of the Order of Canada two years ago.

He presided over his first Citizenship Court in Hamilton recently.

Judge Ronnie cropped

Fifty nine people became citizens of Canad in a ceremony earlier this year when Citizenship Judge Ron Foxcroft presided.

It is an emotional moment for all the participants.  Foxcroft said he was a “little nervous” but once he got into the procedure he said he was “fine”.

Working from a document provided by the federal government Foxcroft said:

“In a few minutes you will be sworn in as Canadian Citizens.  You will swear or affirm your Oath to the Queen, which means you are swearing allegiance to Canada in her name and in her person.

“This is a proud moment for all of you.  It is a memory you and your family will always cherish.”

Foxcroft then turns to the land acknowledgement that is now a part of almost every political event that takes place.

“I would like to acknowledge that this citizenship ceremony is taking place on the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit and the the Haudenosaunee Nations.

“It is essential that all Canadians move forward together on the road to reconciliation, so that we can leave a proper legacy for future generations.

“Candidates for citizenship, I am happy that you have chosen to become citizens of this wonderful country, and it is a privilege for me to be here with you today.  You are following in the footsteps of generations of great Canadians before you.

“Our first Prime, Sir John  A. MacDonald, came here as an immigrant from Scotland with his family when he was five years old. They settled in Loyalist country beside Lake Ontario.  He worked hard all his life and earned the everlasting gratitude of the Canadian people.

“My personal story is one of great gratitude to Canada for all that my country has given me.  My family enjoyed all that this country has to offer.  I was educated in Ontario, became a National Basketball Association referee, bought a trucking company and formed a business that exports to more than 100 countries around the world.

“I was honoured to be made the Honorary Colonel of the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, a renowned Armed Forces unit that fought in Europe in both world wars.  That Regiment is based here in Hamilton.

Citizen group - Foxcroft

Four of Canada’s newest citizens

“Many of you have travelled far and some have struggled to make a new home in Canada. Your decision meant adapting to a new culture, a new climate, and for most of you a new language.

“You are joining the Canadian story, one that you are now quite familiar with after studying Discover Canada and passing your citizenship test.

“You have learned about Canadian symbols like the Crown, the flag, the coat of arms and our motto, From “Sea to Sea”.

getting a citizenship certificate

The presentation of a Citizenship certificate

“Being a Canadian citizen means a lot more than simply having a piece of paper. It means sharing a common set of Canadian values; having rights and responsibilities, such as being a full member of the Canadian family and the responsibility to obey Canadian laws.

“As a Canadian citizen, you live in a democratic country where individual rights and freedoms are respected.

“Thousands of brave Canadians have fought and died foe these rights and freedoms. The commitment to Canada of our men and women in uniform should never be forgotten or go unrecognized.  We thank them.

“As a Canadian you have the right to vote and to run as a candidate in municipal, provincial and federal elections.  It is your responsibility to find out about the issues in each election, to make your choice and to cast your vote.

“You are free to live and work in any province or territory.  Take responsibility for yourself and your family.  Get involved in our community by becoming a volunteer.  These are responsibilities and privileges we all share and must act upon.

“The future of Canada, our freedom, our democracy, our peaceful society, equality under the law and our prosperity, depends on all of us together.

“You area about to take the Oath of Citizenship.  As you pronounce the words of the oath, take then to heart; they are your commitment to do your best for Canada.

“Please repeat after me:

I swear

That I will be faithful

And bear true allegiance

To Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second

Queen of Canada

Her Heirs and Successors

And that I will faithfully observe

The laws of Canada

And fulfill my duties

As a Canadian citizen

At this point Ron Foxcroft would have stood tall, beamed a great big smile upon the 59 people in the room and said:

“Congratulations, you are now Canadian citizens.”

And then lead them in the singing O Canada

 

 

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Canada Day: Make it a trip to the Farmer's Market in the early morning and stick around for the Drive Thru Ribfest

News 100 redBy Staff

July 1st, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is more to do than expected.

Rotary - LAkeshoreThe Lakeshore Rotary got creative and pivoted from the fall Ribfest and are holding the event on Canada Day in the Burlington Centre (Mall)

It will be a drive a drive through situation with all kinds of signage – Rotary is very good at signage. Traffic will be directed – you pick out and pick up your Ribs – pay for them and drive on through to wherever you are going to chow down those Ribs.

No mention of a beer tent

Expect the Mayor to be there.

The Ribfest opens at 11 am and runs through to 8 pm with music, entertainment and a performance by the Teen Tour Band

Many people see the Terry Fox run as a unique thing that happened in Canada and was the result of one Canadian's supreme effort. The Canadian flag just seems to be a part of the event - and there were plenty of them handed out.

Will this woman be at the Burlington Centre (Mall) on Wednesday?

Earlier in the you can drop in at the Farmer’s Market – that opens at 8:00 am and runs to 2:00 pm.

Attendance by the produce people has been good. Lots of social distance rules in place with clear traffic lane markings.

Make a point of taking your mask. And perhaps wear something with a Canadian flag on it.

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How about a Speakeasy on Old Lakeshore Road ? Space is for rent

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Par

June 30th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Emma aerial site

Site includes a parking lot.

Interested in opening and operating a Speakeasy?

There is a space on Old Lakeshore Road with tonnes of Burlington history that is for rent.

Once known as Emmas’s Back Porch the space has been partitioned with what was The Water Street Cooker being offered for rent as a separate space.

The basement where all the booze was stored is for rent.  The owners appear to be prepared to rent some of it out for “event” purposes.

All the details are set out at this link.

Emma lease notice

An iconic site – looking for a new hospitality operator.

 

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Canada Day will be different - this year we will have to decide just how we individually want to celebrate. Start with a rack of ribs in a parking lot

News 100 yellowBy Staff

June 30th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Canada Day this year isn’t going to be the same.

This year’s Celebrations will be unique.

For starters, we will be having our Ribs in the Burlington Centre parking lot.  And the Farmer’s Market will be open.

Rick Campanelli

Rick Campanelli

The City, with funding support from the Government of Canada, is hosting a virtual Canada Day celebration with former TV host for MuchMusic and ET Canada Rick Campanelli, special events online, musical guests (by video) and activities individuals and families can do while practicing physical distancing.

Following Provincial orders and public health directives, large gatherings will not be permitted. There will be no gatherings or planned activities in Spencer Smith Park.

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation Services, City of Burlington spells out the situation:

“We know this isn’t the big party that everyone has come to know and love that always earns us a Top 100 Festival ranking from Festivals and Events Ontario.

He is no longer "acting"; it's now the real deal as Chris Glenn gets appointed the Director of Parks and Recreation for the city.

Chris Glenn Director of Parks and Recreation for the city.

“Being in a pandemic means we need to be flexible and adapt to what is happening in a safe and responsible way. Large gatherings will not be happening this year but that doesn’t mean we can’t all celebrate and show our Canadian pride in our own special way with our household.

There is a great lineup of activities and performances. If you miss any of the “premiers”, all videos will still be posted on burlington.ca/canadaday.” — Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation Services, City of Burlington

Virtual Schedule and Activities

All virtual activities, a schedule and links to videos will be posted on burlington.ca/canadaday.

Online message from Mayor Marianne Meed Ward and Rick Campanelli, Burlington resident and former TV host for MuchMusic and ET Canada

BTTB - O canada

Burlington Teen Tour Band: They make the city proud

O Canada played by the Burlington Teen Tour Band

Bucket drumming experience with Burlington’s CRASH Rhythm. Watch for the how-to video released the weekend before and get ready to join CRASH Rhythm members on Canada Day for two interactive drumming sessions

White Pine Dancers

One of the White Pine Dancers.

Join First Nations Storyteller and founder of the White Pine Dancers, Aaron Bell for a six-part series of traditional stories that reflect the Indigenous culture and way of life

Special musical guest appearance, by country music star Tim Hicks

Join cities across Canada to celebrate Canada Day, promote diversity, multicultural harmony, and thank all front line essential workers with simultaneous drumming. Pre-registration is required and the link can be found at burlington.ca/canadaday.

Participate in Virtual Fireworks Presented by Bunzl, through the Snap’d Community Hub

Share your Canada Day spirit by decorating your home and posting a photo to Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #BurlONCanadaDayCanadian flag at Quebed referendum

Participate in the Canada Day Play Challenge. With Canadian inspired trivia and activities starting June 27 until July 1, 2020, with new activities added each day. Download the free app at goosechase.com and search for the Canada Day Play Challenge. We have prize packages available for the top three highest scoring teams, with support from Canadian Tire. The grand prize winner will receive a prize package worth $500.

Mayor Meed Ward said: “Canada Day celebrations in Burlington will look a bit different this year and I know our community will safely celebrate this important holiday with the same energy and gratitude we always do.

“We have so much to be thankful for in this country: our democracy, our healthcare, our arts and culture, our gorgeous landscapes and environment, and the diverse and passionate people who contribute to our ongoing evolution as a society. I look forward to enjoying the talented entertainment and creative activities our teams have pulled together for our city.”

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Summer in the city - coping with COVID19

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

June 29th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON’

The Gazette web site, we call it our press room, is undergoing a security upgrade. The content has been hacked into several times and someone is playing with the comments section. Thus, unfortunately, the comments section will not be available until security is solid enough to prevent people from removing what you want to say.

The weather was great.

Loads of people out.

Too many cars with drivers who felt that had to let us know just how much noise their mufflers could make.

The patios weren’t as full as we thought they would be.

Spencer Smith Park was busy but not crowded when we were there and the lines on the Naval Promenade kept people far enough apart.

Kids in the water

It’s what summer at the beach is all about – except that this is not a normal summer.

 

Beach closed sign

Perhaps we have more people in Burlington for whom English is not their first language?

That small Beach created at the foot of the Pier attracted kids that were enjoying making castles in the sane – despite the sign clearly saying the Beach was closed.

That Beach by the way was not planned. While the Pier was being built the currents pulled sand into that spot on the waterfront. That sand by the way drifted all the way from the Scarborough Bluffs.

Walking around downtown was quite nice. The traffic cones that were put up to create walking space for pedestrians did the job.

It made for tight traffic at times – but the public was given the space they needed.

Brant Strret - Wendell rest

The walkway on the street was great for pedestrians. The traffic cones were rather ratty and tattered looking.

The cones that were set out on Brant Street were a little “ratty: looking. The barrier set up on John Street and Lakeshore had really nice clean look to them

Those traffic cones on Brant were an embarrassment.

The ward Councillor and the head honcho at the Downtown Business Association might want to look at the traffic cones in front of Wendell Clark’s and see if they can’t find something a little more attractive. Brant is the prime street in the city.

John Street looking south

These barriers leave a nice clean, rather smart look to the streetscape. Unfortunately, other than the ice cream shop – no one was getting much in the way of traffic.

 

Pump walkway BEST

The patio at The Pump is on the sidewalk – last year the patio was on the street. This set up is much better.

David Barker, an astute observer of what goes on downtown took issue with the way traffic was being managed, particularly at Brant and Lakeshore Road.

He explains:
“If you are driving West along Lakeshore Road and you wish to turn right, north, up Brant Street, and your traffic signal is green, you are unlikely to be able to make a right turn due to pedestrians crossing east/west and west/east across Brant Street. Say, the light then turns red against you but you wish to take advantage of “right on red”, you’re likely unable to be able to do so because pedestrians are now crossing Lakeshore Road in front of you, north/south and vice versa.

“Now consider should you be driving south on Brant Street and you wish to turn either east or west on to Lakeshore Road. When the light is green in your favour you are probably unlikely to be able to do so. That is because pedestrians likely will be crossing Lakeshore Road both on the east side and west side of Brant Street. Southbound traffic on Brant street is more often than not backed up beyond Elgin Street.

“So as you can see the situation is one where both vehicular traffic and pedestrians are vying for the same space on the road at the same time. That combination is not a good mix. Really pedestrians and vehicles should be separated.

“Would it not make more sense to:
(1) have the traffic going east and west along Lakeshore Road have it’s time to move when both south bound traffic on Brant Street and pedestrians are halted.
(2) Then halt pedestrians and traffic on Lakeshore (both directions) allowing traffic south bound on Brant Street to be able to turn East or West without obstacle.
(3) then have all vehicular traffic halted so pedestrians may cross Lakeshore Road and Brant Street in any which direction they like, even diagonally across the intersection if they wish.
(4) Then the cycle starts over.

“This plan allows for pedestrians and vehicles to move freely without obstruction and more importantly safely without frustration.

:The unregulated, unmarked crosswalk at Lakeshore Road and Locust Street adds to the chaos and confusion. It should be regulated and be in step with the traffic signals at both Lakeshore Road and Brant Street and Lakeshore Road and Burlington Street.

“With the great summer weather attracting people, who are already eager to get out after lockdown, to the downtown and Spencer Smith Park there will be more cars back on the road (with reduced lanes) and more pedestrians looking wander around and take advantage of the patios and Spencer Smith Park therefore crossing this intersection.”

City Council’s objective was to ensure that the space on the streets was made available to pedestrians – shared with the vehicles.

It’s not as smooth as people would’ve liked it – but it is a first step.  Many people want all of Brant closed to vehicles from Caroline south – the merchants are dead opposed to that idea.  In many cities closing a road to vehicles improves the pace of business.  The is a great opportunity to give it a try.

One of the sadder signs was the number of former retail locations now store fronts with For Rent signs in the windows.

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Northern Ontario Casino scene undergoing major changes.

News 100 blue

By George Keburia

June 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Casinos across Northern Ontario are hoping to be able to re-open soon amid COVID-19 uncertainty

The coronavirus pandemic has affected the entire world as the number of infections globally has now exceeded a whopping nine million bar.

With over 400 thousand deaths related to the novel coronavirus infection, the vast majority of nations are trying to keep their citizens safe by implementing and maintaining social distancing rules. In these unprecedented times, everyone is held accountable for not putting the national safety at risk. The recent case of Dominic Cummings in the United Kingdom was a great example of how the societies have shifted and become more cautious amid the pandemic.

Besides individual responsibility, the same kind of cautiousness extends to business. Both people and governments try to have a specifically tailored and well-researched approach when it comes to re-opening businesses and their future operations. The Canadian government was one of the first globally to introduce a nation-wide lockdown, resulting in thousands of businesses simply coming to a complete standstill. Many of them had to halt operations while others also were put in a position of having to cancel ambitious projects and future plans.

US border closed PAID

Border to the United States closed – with no clear re-opening date in place.

All of Canada’s industries and businesses came under extreme pressure as the government decided to close its border with the United States. The Americans are the biggest Canadian economic partner with over 85% of exports going to the United States. Under such circumstances, not only exporting businesses but also local companies were impacted negatively. Countless Canadian businesses used to benefit from Americans visiting them over the weekend.

The gambling business in a tricky position

With the mid-march decision of the Canadian government and the prime minister Trudeau, all entertainment businesses were closed indefinitely. These changes naturally affected gambling venues across the nation. They had to cease operations immediately without a chance to evaluate the situation and come up with a solution in a timely manner. Many of the businesses managed to go online within the few days of the new regulations but others had to work and invest heavily in order to survive the turmoil.

In general, the online gambling sector has been on a steep rise throughout the past decade. The representatives of Playamo Canada say, that the incomes from the business across the nation have also been growing.   For firms that were always focused on online gambling, the new regulations were a positive change. They now have a chance to attract customers that can no longer visit brick-and-mortar venues in Canada.

But what happens with those who were dependent on visitors for the majority of their incomes? Canada, particularly Northern Ontario, is home to a high number of luxurious casinos and resorts that have been completely shut for almost the past three months. Their bookings and were canceled while loyal customers have no option but to visit online gambling platforms run by other operators.

Gateway Casinos forced to halt its construction in North Bay

Among many of Canada’s famous gambling operators, Gateway Casinos and Entertainment is truly a shining star. The customers’ favorite company provides high-quality luxury venues to its loyal customers across the entire country. It has popular venues located in Sudbury and Sault St. Marie.

Gateway North Bay PAID

North Bay Casino construction site.

However the pandemic meant operations of Gateway-owned casinos had to be closed.  Those crucial venues for the company remain closed to the public. The representatives of Gateway say, that the timing of the pandemic could not have been worse. Their new major project in North Bay, a casino resort that already has a green light for construction, had to be stopped. There is simply not enough certainty in the industry to continue the construction of a major venue. The costs of the construction are absolutely tremendous and the company can not afford it unless the already-existing venues are back up and running.

Therefore, ‘Gateway casinos and entertainment’ is now focusing on opening up its Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie venues to the public. The cash inflow from those venues is unlikely to result in the construction of the new North Bay venue. However, operational casinos would ensure the safety of jobs, as well as more security for the business. The latter is of utmost importance since, without any certain and specific timeframe on the process of opening casinos, Gateway’s future plans remain halted.

How can casinos open going forward?

Gateway Sudbury PAID

The thrill of the win

The chief of Gateway’s Sudbury venue, Richard Paquin commented on the company’s future plans: “We haven’t spoken to anybody about that because it’s too early in the process,” However, the Ontario’s government has recently announced its plans to gradually re-open entertainment businesses that could potentially include casinos. Gateway also had a brief communication with the government regarding the issues but no specific answers were given from the authorities.

However, what we know today for sure is that sooner or later, the casino business will start coming back. The question is in what form will it operate? What sacrifices will operators have to make? The expectation is that the opening of venues will be discussed individually.

Every space comes with its own specifications and needs to be rearranged considering those factors. One thing is apparent: the most affected part of the casino business will be the venues’ capacity. Fewer people will be allowed per room with fewer people sitting around tables. This could mean significantly lower incomes for businesses, but with social distancing remaining the only known and effective tool against the spread of the virus, the venues will have to adjust.

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Spray pads to open June 26; Redesigned summer camps and outdoor pools open July 13

News 100 yellowBy Staff

June 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City announced the opening of spray pads on June 26. Redesigned summer camps and outdoor pool programs will begin on July 13.

Following public health recommendations and the Province’s emergency orders, COVID-19 precautions and preparations will be in place to reduce the spread of the virus. All redesigned programs and services will look very different from pre-COVID-19 programs and will still be high quality, fun, active and create great summer memories.

Kids in splash pad

This place will be busy on Friday.

To ensure crowd management, all programs and pool use (including lap and rec swims) will require pre-registration and payment. There is no registration required for spray pads.

All programs and offerings can be viewed online at burlington.ca/summer.

Registrations are only being accepted online at liveandplay.burlington.ca. If you need assistance, please call 905-335-7600 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday or email liveandplay@burlington.ca.

Anyone attending a camp or swim must follow strict COVID-19 procedures. Staying home if the participant or any family member is sick or has come in contact with anyone who is sick. Wash hands frequently, cough and sneeze into sleeve/arm and follow all City rules and regulations. Masks and face coverings will be optional.

sociial circles

Is this a summer day camp setting?

Summer Camps
Full-day summer SNAP camps for kids aged four to ten years will be held at Brant Hills Community Centre, Tansley Woods Community Centre, Aldershot Arena and Haber Recreational Centre.

Performing Arts Camp for kids ages nine to 15 years will be held at the Burlington Performing Arts Centre.
Camp activities will include outdoor games, crafts, art and nature-based activities.

Funny hats and smiling faces - all part of the summer day camp experience.

Funny hats and smiling faces – all part of the summer day camp experience.

Camper’s safety is the first priority. Staff will receive enhanced training on the additional health and safety regulations. There will now be one dedicated staff to every four children, with a maximum of two staff and eight campers in a room.

Each camp group will stay together for the entire week, and not interact with other groups.

To support and enhance the safety of campers and staff, caregivers will receive a phone call before camps begin to emphasize the importance of following the camp code of conduct and do a pre-camp health check.

Completing the call with staff is required for your child to be admitted to camp. In addition, parents will learn about the cleaning of facilities with special attention to high touch surfaces like door handles and counters. Each camp group will have dedicated spaces and washroom facilities to further reduce exposure to other groups.

Caregivers will also be sent an email with a video link to where to drop campers off, facility layout and set up as well as were to pick up the camper at the end of the day.

 

Registration dates, beginning at 9 a.m.:
• Monday, June 29 for camp programs July 13 and July 20
• Monday, July 13 for camp programs July 27 and Aug. 3
• Monday, July 27 for camp programs Aug. 10 and 17
• Monday, Aug. 10 for camp programs Aug. 24
Outdoor Pools

Nelson Pool and Splash Park, Mountainside Pool and Splash Park and LaSalle Splash Park will be ready on July 13.

The number of people allowed in at any time will be kept low so people can maintain physical distancing. The play features at Nelson and Mountainside will remain closed. To register online for lap and rec swims 25 hours prior to start of program time, go to liveandplay.burlington.ca.

Splash pad LaSalle - swimming

The number of kids in those wading pool will be lower.

In addition to the outdoor pools, spray pads will open on Friday, June 26. For a listing of locations, go to burlington.ca/waterplay.

At the spray pads, please ensure your child stays two metres away from anyone not in your social circle or household. If a spray pad is crowded, please try another spray pad or come back another day.

As residents continue to rediscover many of their favourite spaces and activities in the city, City services may look different as we work to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The City’s commitment to providing the community with essential services remains a priority. Sign up to learn more about Burlington at Burlington.ca/Enews and download the free City of Burlington app.

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Parks and Recreation are thinking about how they might re-open the Seniors' Centre

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

June 24, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Parks and Recreation department is sounding out people on opening up the Seniors’ Centre.

People who provide some of the programing to the city on a contract basis have been called to see if they would be interested in running classes that would be limited to 10 people.

Seniors taking in the music

There won’t be audiences this size at the Seniors’ Centre – but small programs are being considered.

There would be a limit on the number of people permitted to be in the building – the number we are getting is 90.
Cleaning crews would do a wipe down after every class.

Parks and Recreation Director Chris Glenn said: “ We are preparing a report to bring to council in the next cycle of meetings, that talks about the proposed redesigned adult / older adult programming plan, based on the stage 2 provincial guidelines. More to come as council discusses the redesign plan.

Members of the Seniors Advisory Committee are reported to not have heard from anyone within Parks and Recreation.

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