Quarries are about to get a different tax category if the Mayor gets her way - and on this one she is probably going to get her way

By Pepper Parr

September 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Who knew?  It wasn’t until we saw the note on what the Mayor had done at the AMO (Association of Municipalities of Ontario) conference that we learned quarries are taxed as farms.

The tax rate for farms is very low.  Not sure if there is a tax rate for quarries.

Bringing home the bacon for the citizens of the city. Wants to change the tax category for the quarries – currently taxed as farms

The mayor represents Burlington on TAPMO (Top Aggregate Producing Municipalities of Ontario) given our city has two active quarries: Nelson and Aldershot.

TAPMO represents local Municipalities across Ontario, including Halton Region, that have significant reserves and annual production of aggregate, stone and sand materials. Their membership shares the perspective that local municipalities have a vital role to play in ensuring a sustainable aggregate industry for Ontario.

In addition, TAPMO members believe the aggregate industry should pay their fair share of municipal property taxes and be classed as profitable businesses rather than as farm.

Does this look like a farm? Its tax classification has it down as a farm. How long has that been going on? And how did the quarries get it in the first place?

The current farm classification has cost municipalities millions of dollars in lost revenue, for which taxpayers have picked up the tax, effectively resulting in Burlington taxpayers subsidizing the aggregate industry.

At our January board meeting, TAPMO approved hiring Upstream Strategy Group to conduct their advocacy strategy and initiative with the Provincial Government to correct the tax classification.

Individual meetings are also being arranged between Upstream, the mayor and MPPs in each of the aggregate- producing municipalities. Our meeting for Burlington is currently being scheduled. TAPMO is requesting financial support from member municipalities in 2021 for this advocacy work.

There are three shale quarries in Aldershot – they have been taxed as farms – Mayor wants to see that changed.

Halton Regional Council has already supported this priority and directed staff to contribute to this advocacy effort through the approval of the contribution of $2,100 from the Council-approved operating budget to TAPMO.

The Jefferson salamander, native to the northern part of the city.

The Regional resolution requested  Halton municipalities to also independently support the advocacy work around the  change in tax classification, so the mayor will work with the two Councillors (Bentivegna and Nisan) who represent rural Burlington to bring something forward in early fall, including, if applicable, a funding request.

The quarries can look forward to a financial squeeze.

Perhaps they will argue that the land is a breeding ground for the Jefferson Salamander and the habitat could be classified as a farm – maybe?

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Saturday in the city - Food Truck Festival was doing great business

By Pepper Parr

September 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Saturday afternoon in the city. Weather was great but the streets in the core were quiet – patios weren’t’ all that populated and that place to be seen on the north side of Lakeshore Road west of Brant was very quiet – you could actually get a seat.

Slide down into Spencer Smith Park and head west and there were line-ups more than a block long – people waiting to get into the Food Truck Festival.

The lineups to get into the Food Truck Festival were long but they moved very quickly.

The line moved quickly – security was keeping a count on the number of people who would be let into the fenced in area. There was an entrance and an exit gate. Inside, all kinds of people – but it wasn’t packed – the objective was to make that six foot distance thing possible.

Great crowds – but no overcrowding. Security ensured that the count was kept at a safe level.

While downtown, one wants to check on the construction sites and see how the high rise developments are doing.

Spent a couple of minutes in front of the Waterfront Hotel site to try and get a sense as to just how close to the sidewalk those 30 and 24 story buildings would be.

The first four levels would be at about where the red arrow is on the photograph. It isn’t clear how far back on the four level podium the towers would be. Lakeshore will never be the same – you won’t be able to see or feel the lake.

If there ever was an iconic location – Spencer Smith Park and the lake are it for Burlington.  Done the right way the site could put the city on the map as a destination.  Few feel the ideas being floated are the right thing for the city.

The red line is where the north wall of the four level podium would be located. Atop the podium would be 26 storeys of housing.

Each tower would sit atop a four level podium. There would be an open space between the two towers that would be at about where John Street is – that opening would give a glimpse of the lake – the property has a steep grade – much like the one at the Bridgewater development a block to the east.

Named The Gallery – the Carriage Gate development is well underway. Four floors in place, underground garage completed – 22 more to go.

The 28 storey tower Carnacelli development is growing level by level. Four levels have been poured – 22 to go. Occupancy is said to be sometime in 2022 – at that time citizens will get to know what a high rise building is and what it feels like to have one opposite city hall.

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Debate on the environment and climate change draws a respectable audience - full debate now online

By Pepper Parr

September 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

You could almost feel the enthusiasm and the sense of accomplishment in the Hamilton Environment Network achievement – they put on five virtual debates – one in each of the ridings in the Halton Region.

Links to the five virtual debates were on the screen. All you had to do was click on the linage for the community you wanted and you got taken to the debate.

“We did it! On Wednesday, we hosted 5 virtual debates across Halton. These debates are part of the 100 Debates on the Environment initiative, a coordinated day of national non-partisan debates across the country, coordinated by our good friends at GreenPAC.”

The 100 debates refers to debates that took place elsewhere in Canada.

The debates were a little on the choppy side technically but when they worked – and they worked very well  for the most part viewers got to hear what candidates had to say about significant environmental issues.

What was disappointing was that not one of the five debates that matter to the people who live in Halton included a representative from the Conservative Party.

HEN went to considerable effort to include everyone – for reasons that were not given the Conservatives chose no to take part.

The people who did all the work to make the debates possible thanked everyone and made no comment on those that chose not to participate.  The Gazette is not that polite – shame on the Conservative Party for not speaking about the most pressing issue the community, this province, this country this world face.  They had an obligation to let the public hear what the individual candidates have to say.

Click HERE for the HEN YouTube channel – then click on the image for the debate you want to watch.

The public is still learning how to work with virtual events – one of the nice things about a recording of the debate is you can put it on pause.

 

 

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Joseph Brant Hospital Implementing Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccination - Progressive Plan to Reach 100% COVID-19 Vaccination

By Staff

September 10th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

From a media release put out earlier today:

Joseph Brant Hospital (JBH) is committed to providing high-quality care and a safe environment for our patients, their loved ones, our healthcare teams and our community.

The leadership being shown by the Burlington and area hospitals on the matter of vaccination is to be applauded.

The latest provincial modeling indicates that Ontario is in the midst of a fourth wave. There are concerns over the rapid transmission of the Delta variant, and its impact on hospitalization and the strain on critical care. We know that COVID-19 vaccination is a critical measure to minimizing the risk to our healthcare system and ending the pandemic.

In accordance with Ontario’s Chief Medical Officer of Health’s Directive #6 which mandates COVID-19 vaccination policies in high-risk settings, JBH is implementing a phased COVID-19 Immunization and Management Policy that will apply to all staff and physicians, volunteers, learners, contracted staff and other third parties effective September 7.

Our goal, consistent with our hospital partners in the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, Norfolk, Brant, Burlington (HNHBB) region, is to have everyone who works at and with our hospitals to be fully vaccinated.

JBH is taking a progressive approach to achieving this goal, and is supporting our staff, physicians and other healthcare professionals who work in the hospital towards full vaccination. This includes completing formal and mandatory education on COVID-19 vaccines by September 17 and undergoing twice-weekly rapid antigen testing prior to reporting to work, starting September 16.

Should this initial phase result in less than 100 per cent of eligible staff being fully vaccinated in the weeks ahead, JBH will proceed to mandatory vaccination effective November 1, 2021.

We have already put in place additional policies that will require all eligible new hires, as well as students, volunteers, contracted staff and third parties who come to our hospital to be fully vaccinated by November 1.

There is significant evidence that vaccines are safe and effective, and the best defense to beat COVID-19. Full vaccination is critical to protecting our patients, their loved ones and our healthcare workers from COVID-19, while helping to maintain capacity in the healthcare system so we can continue to provide care to our community when it is most needed.

As healthcare workers, we all have a responsibility to minimize the risks to the safety of our patients and their essential care providers, using all of the tools at our disposal. This includes our longstanding safety policies, Personal Protective Equipment, Infection Prevention and Control practices – and now vaccination. It is the right thing to do, and a necessary step to ending this pandemic.

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Police Identify Suspect Wanted in Burlington Shooting

By Staff

September 10th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Regional Police today issued a photograph identifying a suspect wanted in a shooting in the City of Burlington on September 9, 2021.

A warrant has been issued for the arrest of David Ryan Lavoie (37) of Hamilton.  He is wanted for the charge of Attempt Murder.

David Ryan Lavoie – suspect in an attempted murder.

David Lavoie is a white male, and bald with a short, stubbly beard. He is 5’10” tall with a muscular build. He was last seen wearing a black shirt (possibly a tank top) and grey pants.

If you see David Lavoie, DO NOT APPROACH, and call police immediately.

The shooting took place at a residence in the area of Maple Crossing Boulevard shortly after 6 pm on September 9, 2021. One victim was transported to hospital and is currently in stable condition. We can confirm that the victim and the suspect are known to one another.

Residents can continue to expect a police presence in the area  while they hold the scene for the ongoing investigation.

Anyone with information regarding this incident who has not already spoken with police is asked to contact the 3 District Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905-825-4777 ext. 2316.

Anyone with surveillance or dash cam footage in the area of Maple Crossing Boulevard and Maple Avenue between the hours of 5:30 – 7:30 pm on September 9th is also asked to contact police.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers. “See something? Hear something? Know something? Contact Crime Stoppers” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.

 

 

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Cars and climate change - is the plan in place realistic?

By Staff

September 10th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Other than why we are even having a federal election now – the burning issue is climate change.

The biggest opportunity for the average person in Burlington to take part in reducing C02 emissions is to take cars off the road.

The city has a target.

Reducing the use of vehicles by more than 10% could be described as a pipe dream. Nothing on how the city plans to do this.

A look at the modal split for 2019 shows us where we are.

The measure is for cars on the left and occupants on the right.

 

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Conservative Candidate a No Show for the Burlington Environmental Group Debate

By Pepper Parr

September 9th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

The Conservative Party candidate did not participate in the Burlington debate.

 

The Halton Environmental Network held virtual debates last night for each of the ridings within the Regional boundaries.

 

While the focus was the environment the debate covered almost everything you could think of  and then some.

Nick Page spoke eloquently and with more passion that usually seen in Burlington debates.

Chris Cullis did just as well for the Green Party.

MP Karina Gould had an incredible grasp on just what the Liberal government had done for the city.  She was spitting out numbers at quite a pace.

Emily Brown didn’t make it to the debate.  No word on why at this point.

The debates are well worth the time if yo need to think through where your vote should go.

When they are available online we’ll let you know

 

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Abuse & Harassment of our Frontline Healthcare Staff & First-Responders has to Stop

Statement from Burlington’s Community Leaders in Support & Protection of our Frontline Healthcare Staff &

First-Responders from Abuse & Harassment

Community leaders have spoken out strongly against the harmful messages, harassment and misinformation targeted against our medical and healthcare professionals.

In their statement they said:

“We would like to take a moment to thank our front-line hospital and health workers, physicians and first- responders for your sacrifices throughout this pandemic and going above and beyond every day to keep us safe. We stand with you, and know that in these times of increasing volatility, our healthcare professionals and first-responders need to see our community’s support once again.

“Recently, there have been protests held outside of the Joseph Brant Museum, adjacent to Joseph Brant Hospital, and other healthcare settings throughout the province and country, as well as at the private residences of elected officials. We support everyone’s right to peaceful protest, even when we do not agree on the subject matter; however, recent protests have included harmful messages that result in emotional distress and moral injury.”

In the past week the Gazette has received a number of Letters to the Editor that spew the kind of comments we are seeing on national and local television.

When we think the content qualifies as hate messaging we will forward them to the police along with the IP address the words came from.

We are all for free speech – but this kind of hate stuff is not acceptable.

We along with the community leaders condemn, in the strongest of terms, this targeted and misdirected abuse and harassment of healthcare workers that has occurred during these recent protests.

“To protestors: Please take your messages to the decision-makers at City Hall, Queen’s Park and Parliament Hill, and away from our hospitals and the private homes of our community leaders. We also ask you to be considerate of those who need access to our hospital for life-saving treatments and those visiting their loved ones.

Healthcare workers do not make policy.
“To our local hospital and healthcare professionals and first-responders: Please know there is an overwhelming majority in our community who support you and the enormous sacrifices you have made and continue to make during this pandemic. We’ve publicly shown our support and appreciation for your sacrifices by standing outside of our homes, on our balconies and on sidewalks applauding you through the FrontLine Clap; holding drive-by parades of emergency vehicles and elected leaders in front of Joseph Brant Hospital; lighting our pier blue and posting countless messages of support on social media.

“Additionally, the Burlington Pier will be lit blue tonight in support of our healthcare and frontline workers and the City of Burlington is planning for additional days later this month.”

“You have all gone above and beyond every day, putting yourselves in harm’s way to keep us safe. We are immeasurably grateful for your continued strength, perseverance, and commitment to caring for the people that you serve. Please know that we acknowledge and appreciate the positive difference that you are making in the lives of all your patients, their families and our community members.

“We thank you and we stand with you!”

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Are we ready for this?

By Pepper Parr

September 9th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Are we ready for this?

They will stand on Lakeshore Road between Brant and Elizabeth Streets.

The required Pre-Application meeting took place virtually last night.

There was some expensive talent talking on behalf of the developer who wants to put up two towers: a 30 storey and a 24 story.

The plan is to have 23 studio apartments; 212 single bedroom apartments; 165 1 bedroom + den; 139 2 bedroom and some 3 bedroom.  No mention of price.

The panel was asked if there would be any affordable units – really?

There will be a significant bike tails system – but they won’t extend out onto the Pier. – even thought they appear to do so in the report.

View from the lake. Downtown Burlington will never be the same if this gets approved as it has been presented.

During the presentation, given by people representing the developer, David Faletta attempted to convince viewers that the old Urban Growth Centre boundary would apply arguing that the Regional Official Plan affirmed the new boundary but that the Minister had yet to sign off on the Regional decision.

There is a lot more to this story.  Stand by.

 

 

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Online registration for fall swimming lessons begin 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 18.

By Staff

September 8th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City of Burlington will open online registration for fall swimming lessons and aquatic leadership programs beginning 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 18.

Programs will be viewable online at Burlington.ca/recreation on Friday, Sept. 10.

A Burlington resident doing a well executed crawl.

To register on Sept. 18, go to liveandplay.burlington.ca. There is no in-person registration.

Aquatic leadership programs are those that can lead a person to becoming a lifeguard:

• Airway Management
• Bronze Cross, Medallion and Star
• Swim Instructor
• National Lifeguard Certification

All City programs will continue to follow public health guidance, including physical distancing, capacity limits and wearing masks or face coverings. All swimming lessons are low ratio to ensure physical distancing. Caregiver support is required in the water for participants enrolled in Parent and Tot levels up to and including Swimmer 3.

Individuals participating in an in-person program will be required to fill out the mandatory health screening form at Burlington.ca/screening before each session.

• Individuals who have questions or require assistance can email liveandplay@burlington.ca or call 905-335-7738 between 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekends.

• Recreation fee assistance funding is available to resident individuals or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreation programs. For more information or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance. You can also leave a confidential voicemail message at 905-335-7738, ext. 8501 and staff will return your call to assist you.

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Tim Hortons® Smile Cookie Campaign is Back September 13th to 19th

By Staff

September 8th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Robin Bailey, Executive Director of the Burlington Food Bank believes that the best way to get the support you need is to create collaborative relationships.

He works with a number of organizations to source the food he needs to help people who need help. The pandemic changed the way Food Banks work.

The need is much higher – while there are some people who are not impacted financially by Covid19 – there are many who don’t have the money needed to put food on the table.

The Food Bank has been there week after week for more than 18 months – helping out those who need help.

Tim Hortons restaurant in Burlington are donating 100% of proceeds from sales of Smile Cookies to the Burlington Food Bank.

This year in Burlington, local Tim Hortons restaurant owners and guests will be raising money to support the Burlington Food bank. Burlington Tim Hortons owners have been supporting the Burlington Food Bank for many years and this event is a major fundraiser raising $69, 249.00 during the 2020 campaign. The funds will be used to help with the snack program for school aged children in Burlington along with purchasing healthy nutritious food for individuals and families than need some help throughout the year.

“Everyone at the Burlington Food Bank is thankful for the incredible community support we receive through this great initiative and it allows us to serve our neighbours, thank you so much to all of the Burlington store owners and their customers!”

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Chamber Of Commerce announces appointment of Terry Caddo as President and CEO effective September 13, 2021.

By Staff

September 8th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Jennifer Smith, Chair of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce said earlier today: “On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to welcome Terry Caddo  to the Chamber and I look forward to working with him as we continue our transformative journey aimed at bringing life to business in Burlington.”

Terry is a not-for-profit senior executive with extensive and award-winning experience in the attractions and tourism industry. Recently, Terry was the Executive Director of the Canada Blooms Horticulture Society. Prior to that, he had senior management roles in Marketing and Operations with the Royal Botanical Gardens and Ontario Place.

Terry Caddo, incoming President and CEO of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce

“I am honoured to be taking on this important leadership role with the Burlington Chamber of Commerce. During my time with the Royal Botanical Gardens, I became acquainted with many local businesses in Burlington. I look forward to meeting more in my new capacity with the Chamber,” said Mr. Caddo.

“Advocating on behalf and maintaining the gold standard of support for Burlington businesses is my top priority, while ensuring that those same businesses have a place to thrive and grow.”

 

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At a Statutory meeting last night the public got to see how changes get made - dozens had wanted to delegate and didn't know how

By Pepper Parr

September 8th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is a certain amount of satisfaction watching a political leader evolve.

They don’t all manage to grow into real leaders able to listen and to hear.

Marianne Meed Ward was just a citizen when this picture was taken – now she is on the other side of the podium. committee.

A number of years ago when Marianne Meed Ward was the council member for ward 2 she came to the realization that people were not aware of what was going on in their communities. A development was being proposed, notices were sent out but to a limited number of people. Meed Ward decided to do something about that and the practice now is to send notices to people within a 120 metre radius of a development.

During a meeting last night when there was a Statutory meeting about the Oval Court development a number of people complained that they had not received the notice of the meeting.

A staff member was asked if notices could be sent to a wider radius – he commented on possible limitations within the Planning Act.
Watching the web cast you could see the Mayor thinking it through – thinking perhaps about how she could arrange to have Statutory meeting notices sent to a larger area.

Watch for something like that in the months ahead.

Later in the same meeting as council members were preparing to wrap it up for the day – it was approaching 10:00 pm, the Mayor took a moment to comment on what things used to be like when development applications were filed..

There would be a Notice of a development application.

There was no such things as a pre-application meeting.

The application would be submitted and then things went quiet – not a word.

Then a Statutory meeting was called. The Planning Act required those meetings.

Council required a report from Staff with a recommendation on the development. They could say yes – it looks good or it is not a good development application and does not represent good planning.

What Meed Ward found amazing at the time was that the Staff Report would be submitted at the same time the Statutory meeting took place.

Whatever comments the public wanted to make during the Statutory meeting was irrelevant – the Staff report had already been written.

That said Meed Ward was the way things were done.

Councillors had been away from the business of getting things done for six weeks – it was a slow start plagued by technical issues. Delegations to the Statutoy meeting were coming in at a surprising clip – getting the equipment to work was a challenge.

Last night there was a Statutory meeting on the Oval Court development. There were some technical problems and it turned out that a lot of people wanted to delegate and found that they were not able to do so.

Again there were technical problems.

The Statutory meeting was very unsatisfactory to both the residents, staff and Council members.

But the meeting had taken place.

Mark Simeoni, Director of Community Planning, told Council that a Statutory meeting was mandated – a meeting must be held and it must be advertised and held in public.

He however added that there was nothing in the Act that said the city was limited to just one Statutory meeting.

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward: All the ideas, all the things she wanted to do while a member of Council can now be advanced as Mayor.

Expect the lawyers who were watching the web cast to be searching through their copies of the Planning Act to see if that was true.
This is a different council, breaking the practices of the past and finding new more effective ways to get things done.

Mayor Meed Ward is far from perfect – she has a lot of growing to do yet – but it is interesting to watch her as she thinks something through, makes a note and comes back to it later on.

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Climate change is the focus for an all candidate virtual event

By Pepper Parr

September 7th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The election that few wanted does need attention – there are issues to be discerned.

The Halton Environment Network (HEN) and the Chamber of Commerce are hosting debates.

HEN is part of a North American event – for us in the Region of Halton the focus is on the federal election and a drill down into what the candidates have to say about climate change and the environment.

A panel has been created for each of the constituencies in the Region.

For the Burlington people that includes the constituencies of Burlington, Oakville North Burlington and Milton – which includes the northern part of Burlington.

There are 120 communities across the country holding similar events in every constituency – which is quite an undertaking.

There is a youth group involved with different moderators for each constituency – actually there are two moderators for each constituency.

There are two questions that will be asked at each event; then there is a rapid fire set of questions followed up by questions from the audience.

The two core questions will be asked at all of the 120 communities taking part.

There will be live polls taking place during the two hour event

The only regrettable part of all this is that is takes place at the same time as the leaders debate.

The upside is that HEN will be posting their debates to the HEN YouTube page on their web site.

So you can go back at any time and listen to what the candidates in your riding have to say.

You can check out their web site for the details and register.

Please join Halton Environmental Network (HEN), CFUW Oakville, Sustainable Milton and CFUW Georgetown on Wednesday September 8th, 2021 at 8 pm for the Virtual Debates on the Environment.

Click here to register

.

Where do your candidates stand on YOUR issues? This is your opportunity to meet and listen to your Federal Election Candidates and engage with them virtually on the issues that matter most to you.

Submit your questions! Register for the riding you live in and settle in for what looks like a well organized event.

You can register for the debate in the following communities.

Burlington

Milton

Oakville

Oakville North-Burlington

Wellington-Halton Hills

 

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You've got mail - MoH has information for you

By Staff

September 8th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

You’ve got mail!

The Medical Officer of Health for the Region has issued an amended Letter of Instructions to workplaces to keep staff and patrons safe

The Class Order has also been revised to reflect Provincial directions for case and contact management

Halton Region’s Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Hamidah Meghani.

Halton Region’s Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Hamidah Meghani, has issued an amended Letter of Instructions to businesses and organizations to support their efforts to protect their staff and customers/patrons from COVID-19, preventing the spread in their workplaces and our community.

The amended Instructions will replace two existing sets of Instructions issued on May 8 and February 12, consolidating the information and making it easier for businesses and organizations to understand and implement these requirements and current Provincial Rules for Step 3.

The amended Instructions outline key public health measures that workplaces must take to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and also provide guidance to workplaces on what to do if one or more of their workers has COVID-19 presenting the potential for a workplace outbreak.

New in the amended Instructions are requirements for businesses and organizations with 100 or more workers physically present at the workplace (including those working in the community) to:

• Establish, implement and ensure compliance with a COVID-19 safety plan
• Establish, implement and ensure compliance with a COVID-19 workplace vaccination policy

The amended Instructions also provide additional contact tracing measures in certain settings, including the collection and maintenance of customer/patron contact information for places where there is a higher risk of COVID-19 exposure through closer contact or lack of masking.

This will help Halton Region Public Health to achieve prompt contact tracing for high-risk COVID-19 exposures – essential to preventing further spread of the Delta variant, which we know to be highly transmissible and present greater risk for severe illness and hospitalization especially for the unvaccinated.

The amended Instructions are effective Friday, September 10, 2021 at 12:01 a.m.

To read Dr. Meghani’s amended Instructions to businesses and organizations and for more information and guidance, please visit halton.ca/COVID19.

Class Order updated to align with Provincial guidance for case and contact management

Halton Region’s Medical Officer of Health has also amended Halton’s Class Order under Section 22 of the Health Protection and Promotion Act. Effective 12:01 a.m. on September 10, 2021 to reflect new Provincial directions for case and contact management of COVID-19.

Key amendments to Halton’s Class Order, which requires those with or exposed to COVID-19 to self-isolate to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, include:

• Updated guidance for how long people must self-isolate based on their symptoms

• Reducing the length of time people with high-risk exposures must self-isolate from 14 to 10 days

• Relieving people with high-risk exposures who are vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 infections of the requirement to self-isolate, at the discretion of Halton Region Public Health

 

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Which constituency do you live in

By Staff

September 6th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington has three people representing them in the House of Commons.

The maps below set out the boundaries for each.

The northern part of Burlington is part of the Milton constituency.

 

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School board will rename Ryerson school - city will rename the abutting park

By Staff

September 7th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton District School Board wants ideas from the public on the renaming of Ryerson Public School.

The city wants idea from the public on renaming the park that abuts the school.

Could they not create a joint committee and come up with a single name ?

Not on your life – there is too much political upside for all the politicians to share this one.

The school will be renamed – as will the park that abuts the property.

The decision to dump the name of Egerton Ryerson was done very very quickly – basically on one delegation from an Indigenous parent.

The statue of Ryerson was toppled shortly after it was splattered with paint. The head of the statue ended up on an Indigenous reserve at the end of a pole.

There is tonnes of research on just what Ryerson did and didn’t do but those documents aren’t going to get much attention.

This is classic rush to judgement and lets pile on a good thing.

Community members are encouraged to submit a suggestion for the new name of the school by Sept. 24

In a media release the HDSB said: “Ryerson Public School was named after Egerton Ryerson for his contributions to the Ontario education system, however, Ryerson was also instrumental to the design of Canada’s residential school system.

Students, families and community members are encouraged to submit suggestions for a new name for the school between Sept. 7 – 24, 2021.

The HDSB recognizes the significance of naming a new school as an opportunity to:

• reflect the geography, history, local environment, culture or traditions of the community;
• consider equity, diversity and inclusion in the school community;
• name a renowned person of historical significance to the Halton community, or a real person whose contribution to society or humanity is recognized and valued across Canada.

Suggestions can be made:

• By completing the online form
• By fax — 905-335-4447
• By mail — Communications Dept., Halton District School Board,
PO Box 5005 STN LCD 1, Burlington, ON L7R 3Z2

Suggestions will be accepted until Friday, Sept. 24, 2021.

Each name that is submitted will be reviewed by a committee which will include parent/guardian representation. A shortlist of names will be prepared and presented to the Board of Trustees who will select the final name at one of the regularly scheduled Board meetings in November 2021.

The selected name for the school will be announced in a news release and posted on the HDSB website (www.hdsb.ca) and social media.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

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For parents there is going to be one question: Is my child's teacher vaccinated? Unfortunately - it is not a question you are allowed to ask

By Pepper Parr

September 6th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Tomorrow morning when parents pack their children off to school or clear the dining room table and set them up for a virtual classroom they will begin the third years of living through a pandemic.

Classroom experiences will be different.

The Halton District School Board (HDSB) is as ready as it can be for the start of the school year.

Few fully appreciate that the HDSB has to comply with the guidance that comes from the province in terms of what they are required to deliver in the way of an education to the students.

The Board then has to coordinate with the Medical Officer of Health to ensure that the best practices are in place.

The province for their part seem to be always late getting out of the gate leaving the professionals who have to make it all work to continue to do “last minute” stuff

The Superintendents have to scramble to get the message down the line to the principals who will open the doors on Tuesday.

Board of Education cannot mandate that teachers need to be vaccinated – there is a mandatory vaccination disclosure policy.

That disclosure is confidential.

Don’t ask.

The Boards are required to advise the province how many people have been vaccinated, how many people are exempt and how many people chose not to be vaccinated and are being tested and going through an educational program.

The reporting to the province is done monthly. The first report will be sent in on September 10th.

The requirement to disclose applies to everyone: teachers, staff, volunteers, contract people working for the Board

The Rapid Tests those who chose not to be vaccinated are required to administer can be done at home and are paid for by the Board – they are not cheap.

The testing is to be done weekly.

The School boards report to the province and the province is understood to be publishing that information by September 10th – so we will know how many un-vaccinated people there are in the schools.

A teacher or teaching aide can choose not to be vaccinated.  So we have a teacher who is vaccinated who may have to work beside a teaching aide who has chosen not to be vaccinated and doesn’t have to tell anyone – other than the Board and that information is confidential.

Those who choose not to be vaccinated do have to undergo regular tests once a week – the test can be administered at home.

The testing kits come in boxes of 25 units.  The Board has to find a way to get those test units to those who chose not to be vaccinated without putting their personal private information at risk.

It might be like those sanitary napkin products that were wrapped in plain brown paper when I was a young man.

Councillor Shuttleworth wanted to know how long the Board would continue to pay for the testing kits – no one was able to give her an answer.

Milton Trustee Danielli wanted to know if a kindergarten teacher was vaccinated but the teaching aide was not vaccinated – did the teacher have to work with the unvaccinated person.

The rules are that no one is allowed to ask a person if they have been vaccinated.

Expect some blow back when this situation sinks into the minds of parents who are worried about what could happen to their child.

The Delta variant of Covid19 travels much more easily that previous variants.  The most recent report from the province for Saturday, September 3rd was: 807 new infections – six deaths.

Of those infected 628 were not vaccinated.

The Public Health people believe that the province is into a fourth wave and the Science Table has reported that numbers will rise in October when people will be indoors much more.

To add to the issues that have to be managed are the school buses.

Getting the buses out of the parking yard on time might be a bit of a problem the first couple of weeks.

There are enough drivers trained and in place – the problem is getting buses out of the yard they are parked in overnight.  First Student Transportation has their yard on Dundas where the Region is doing some major road work – there might be some delays in getting the buses out of the yard on time for them to make their rounds

 

 

 

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Cedric Ennis: Well grounded with a welcoming approach to getting the job done

By Pepper Parr

September 3rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Cedric Ennis started his new job as the Director of Education of the Halton District School Board on August 1st.  There was a lot of work to be done and Ennis was confident that the staff he had was more than up to the job.

His job was to get to know them better and to get to know as much as he could about the Halton Region with its 2,934 elementary teachers, 1,373 secondary teachers and 2,500 non-teaching and support staff.  Add to that the more than 200 principals and vice-principals that are on the front line.

Cedric Ennis: From the largest school board in the country to the Director of Education at one of the highest ranking school boards in the province.

Ennis came to Halton Region from the Toronto District School Board.  His first career choice was not teaching – he studied business at Ryerson and spent more than a decade in the financial sector including a stint as an Assistant Manager with Bank of Nova Scotia.

It was when he found himself in front of students while volunteering in a school that he found his true calling.  “The missing link in my life was waiting for me in those classrooms” explained Ennis.

He returned to the classroom – this time as a student at York University where he earned a degree and was ready for a classroom filled with students.

Ennis takes a welcoming approach to what he does. “I made everyone of my students feel welcome; that I wanted them in my classroom and that they knew I was there to help them.

“I said good morning to every student and good day when they left the classroom.  They knew I was happy to see them.”

Cedric Ennis is a Jamaican.  He was born on the northern part of the Island – has four brothers and a sister.

His cultural base is West Indian.  That he was Black became evident when he came to Canada. ” I knew I was different; that awareness is something you learn to live with and adapt to as best you can.

“Yes it has an impact on you but I was fortunate to come out of it with an understanding that I was different but so were they”

“The big lesson for me was that  what matters is that there be a sense of equity – that we are all born equal.

“That has been the driving force that guided me as a teacher and what I took with me when I moved into management with the Toronto District School Board.

“It is what guides me as I get the feel of the people of Halton.”

He is married with four daughters; all study at the undergraduate level.  He and his wife Beverly; 29 years as a couple, face the challenges that every couple experience.

Heading up an organization that has more employees than the Ford motor plant in Oakville is not something you run into.

What you see is what you get – at least at this point: a straight shooter with a well grounded philosophy on what the classroom is all about..

The approach Ennis takes is to know your people at the granular level – that takes time but if you are open and transparent and make it clear that you are there to listen you can lead and you will succeed.

The challenge for Ennis is just that much bigger as he, along with the rest of the province deal with having to operate while the 4th wave of the pandemic is dealt with; the predictions that by October the 4th wave will be worse then the third wave don’t make it easy.

Ennis leaves you with the impression that you take it all in stride.

During his Director’s Report at his first Board of Trustees meeting earlier this week we got a sense as to how he works with his people.

He delegates and follows through.

During the meeting we learned that the Halton District school Board is going to report a deficit for the third year in a row.

We don’t know yet what kind of a spender Ennis will be nor do we know what his big picture is.  Right now he is working with a Multi Year Plan the trustees approved last year.

There are some big issues and still some emotional baggage from the closing of the two high schools.

We learned that the expansion of Nelson High School needed to handle the students from Bateman that now attend Nelson is not complete.  The library is on the second floor and the second floor and the second elevator is not in place yet.

Cedric Ennis will-work his way through the problems; working with his team adapting to the pandemic problems.  We will need a year to get a sense as to just how well he is working with the trustees.

Right now they are as proud as punch with the choice they made.

 

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Concorde went bust: United plans to buy 50 Boom supersonic jets- have them in the air by 2029

By Ika Elstone

September 3rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Prepare Your Luggage: Supersonic Commercial Flights Are Coming Back

After 20 years, United Airlines announced they would purchase 50 Boom Overture supersonic jets; their objective is to provide Supersonic flights by 2029.

I was a magnificent jet plane – changed the world travel market. A disastrous crash in France brought an end to the Concorde.

Concorde shut down the company in 2003 due to financial problems. Costs of supersonic flights were high,  high fuel consumption and heavy maintenance costs were reflected in ticket prices that hit the roof.

United Airlines, the airline behind the plans is going to have to manage the problems  Concorde had with modern solutions. Jet noise was another problem that banned supersonic aeroplanes. Concorde’s plane makes an overland sonic boom at 105 decibels. That kind of noise is not allowed to fly over land.

What Is the Reason for Supersonic Flights Relaunch?

With modern life needs and high demands for business travelling supersonic flights would be a great addition. The high speed of the supersonic Boom aeroplanes halves the time of travel. For example, if passengers wants to fly from London to Las Vegas, it would take in fastest terms 10 hours and 40 minutes for a distance of 5,222 miles (8,403 km) with Finnair. If United Airlines could provide a supersonic flight, a trip from London Heathrow to the Las Vegas McCarran airport would take about 5 hours and 20 minutes which is a significant difference. Almost 11 hours that plane ride is a whole day, and travellers would need one extra day to spend on a trip.

But, if a supersonic flight lasts around 5 hours, passengers could travel from London to Las Vegas and have an almost whole first day of the trip to spend sightseeing and playing games in a casino. We will need to wait some time to have breakfast in London, and till lunch come to Las Vegas, and play slot machines with cocktails on the side. Until then, we can spend hours on the plane preparing your a-game in Live Casino Roulette to warm you up before landing in Las Vegas. Thousands of people land in Las Vegas every day, and departure, shorter flights would speed up travelling energy and possibly result in higher revenue numbers. Imagine travelling to Las Vegas in just 5 hours. That is the time that you need to travel from London to Paris via road!

Updating Planes

The Boom – longer, faster – will the market accept this latest supersonic jet ?

Firstly, United Airlines needs to solve technical issues in the planes. Noise is the biggest problem that could get solved with some aerodynamic design. NASA has some techniques that could produce optimized air frame shapes that would reduce noise. New aerodynamics design would lower down sonic booms from 105 decibels to 75 decibels. In addition, a new aerodynamics design would allow changes in used materials on the planes. Modern materials are lightweight, and with that, they enable better weight ratios. The lighter weight would eliminate the need for afterburners in take-off moments.

Green Credentials

United Airlines will be a part of the collaborative development of aviation fuels. Their main goal is to establish supplies of sustainable aviation fuel. With the large amounts of fuel propellant that supersonic Boom aeroplanes need, greening with sustainable gas will impact the environment and the whole industry globally.

Just imagine how many hours, and days you could save with twice as short flights. This United Airlines announcement is exciting and will be a great travel possibility in the future.

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