Summer on a Sunday in the City

eventsgreen 100x100By Pepper Parr

August 16th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Summer in the city on a quiet Sunday

Whatever heat there is going to be hasn’t arrived yet.

The streets are quiet. Groups gather around the strip malls.

In the downtown core there is a place where the traffic builds – the Centro Market that is tucked in behind the store on Brant Street – accessed off John Street.

Centro 1

Social distancing limits the number of people who can actually shop – a decent line up, seen on the right, with people waiting for their turn.

Life when there is a pandemic hovering over us like a huge dark cloud changes much of what we do.

Centro 2

People line up, waiting for their turn to enter the market while a guitarist plucks at the strings.

At the market it means standing in line – six feet apart, properly masked waiting for someone in the parking lot doing their shopping to leave so that the next person in line can go in.

There is a quiet casualness to it all.  A musician plays a guitar quietly.

Centro 4

The back hoe rests – waiting for the construction workers to return on Monday.

Yards to the south of the market there is a massive back hoe parked for the weekend – waiting for construction workers to show up on Monday to continue with the excavation of the site that will see The Gallery, a 24 story development that will, when completed, change not only the look but also the feel of the downtown core.

Just to the north of the market – the Bentley, another condominium takes its place.  As high as it is – it doesn’t feel as if the building is looming over the street even though it is flush with the side walk.

None of it seems to change the feel of the market in a parking lot.

Centro 3

Produce is set out on table on on the tail gates of vehicles.

What is missing is a spot where one can sit at a table with a checkered table cloth drinking good coffee, perhaps a double espresso and a croissant.

Can one hope?

 

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Lawyer representing Burlington Rifle and Gun Club said: 'Urinating on somebody’s leg and calling it rain is constitutionally indefensible.'

News 100 blueBy Staff

August 14th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Did you know that Burlington has a Rifle and Revolver Club?  It is located on the upper part of King Road in Bayview Park.

David Bot, president of the club, is one of the applicants involved in a challenge in Federal Court to the Government of Canada’s order prohibiting firearms designed for sporting or hunting.

Gun range location

Gun and rifle club located in a safe isolated location. A city park with a fabulous view.

Competitive shooters, gun ranges and businesses based in Ontario and Québec have launched a challenge in Federal Court to the Government of Canada’s order prohibiting firearms designed for sporting or hunting.

On May 1, 2020, the Government of Canada enacted Order in Council 2020-298 that made Regulations reclassifying as prohibited a large number of previously non-restricted or restricted firearms. The Regulations broadly refer to nine models and their variants as well as two categories of firearms based on bore size and muzzle energy. Over 1,500 models of firearms are now prohibited, meaning that several hundred thousand sporting and hunting firearms are unusable and now worthless.

The applicants bringing the challenge include the following:

The individual applicants know each other through their lawful competitive shooting activities. All are members of gun clubs responsible for the operation of their respective federally approved shooting ranges as well as the International Practical Shooting Confederation, which operates worldwide.

Rifle range - iinside

Competitor at a shooting competition in Burlington.

The business applicants have suffered direct foreseeable losses as a result of the challenged regulation and each of the owners of those businesses are competitive colleagues of the individual applicants through their respective sporting activities.

Lawyers for the applicants, Eugene Meehan, Q.C. and Thomas Slade of Supreme Advocacy LLP in Ottawa, filed the application for judicial review in Federal Court on August 11, 2020.

“Parliament makes it clear that firearms reasonable for sporting or hunting cannot then be prohibited by Cabinet regulation. Just as Canadians have to follow the law, so does Cabinet,” said Meehan. “Many of the newly prohibited firearms have been imported, sold, regulated, and used for years for sporting and hunting. It is inauthentic to say otherwise. Urinating on somebody’s leg and calling it rain is constitutionally indefensible.”

Bay view Park

Bay View Park has a skyline view that is probably the best in the city.

“The number of challenges to the Regulations are a sign of their dysfunction. This particular challenge is designed to complement rather than conflict with those other cases. We specifically are not bringing a Charter challenge, but instead are focusing primarily on the fact the government overstepped its statutory mandate. The government’s narrative keeps changing. The facts don’t,” said David Bot, President of the Burlington Rifle and Revolver Club.

The Executive branch of government can make regulations by way of Orders in Council. Executive legislation, however, is not subject to the same high scrutiny as laws passed by Parliament. For this reason, it is important that the government is careful in making regulations and ensures they adhere to limits established by Parliament and Parliament’s legislative intention.

 

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Cleanup GreenUp - the Burlington Green annual initiative will have a bit of a twist this year.

eventsgreen 100x100By Staff

August 14th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Clean Up Green Up – the annual Burlington Green initiative that cleans up the litter that others leave behind will be different this year..

The program is in its tenth year – and has run into the pandemic wall.

Gathering the way they have in the past with garbage bags and gloves isn’t possible with the required social distancing.

The truly wonderful get together that used to take place in Civic Square won’t be possible either.

The creative minds at Burlington Green have found a way around the WORD – Clean Up Green Up is going to take place whenever you want it to take place and wherever you want it to take place.

They understand that the earth can’t wait. Litter has been accumulating in ditches, hydro corridors, along beaches and waterfronts, and posing serious risks to nature. We can still practice responsible social distancing while caring for the planet.

Burl Green 2020 Clean up graphic

Clean Up Green Up – all year long.

Here is how it will work:

Determine a location in Burlington that your family, friends or small community group would like to clean up.

Let us know about your clean up by filling out the Clean Up Form and you can look forward to receiving the following benefits:

BG Clean up

When they take part in the Clean Up Green Up at a young age – they tend to stay with it – these two are proud as punch with what they managed to get done

Your family/group will be entered into a draw for a chance to win a $50 gift card courtesy of the Burlington Centre! (where you can buy eco-friendly products, food etc.)

You have the opportunity to receive FREE clean up supplies for your group. Litter collection bags and gloves are available for pick-up by request and while quantities last.

We would love to receive a photo of you and your loved ones/group members ‘in action’ with the litter you collected. Send it along to us and we’ll be sure to post it on our Green Wall of Fame webpage for all to see!

Review our handy tip sheet for proper waste collection and safety information 0n the Burlington Green website. .

Ensure a safe Clean Up by following the most up-to-date COVID-19 safety guidelines.

Safely clean up your selected area in the community, count the number of full bags of litter you collected and take a group photo with your collected litter.

Sheldon Creek - farm equipment + Vince

Found in Sheldon Creek – one of the hot spots.

Bring ALL collected waste home with you and dispose of it through your residential curbside collection. (Please do not leave collected waste at any parks, trails, businesses or green spaces, as city waste collection is not available at these locations.)

Send an email (cugu@burlingtongreen.org) to us with your attached group photo, and the total number of bags of litter you collected. We also invite you to let us know the location of any larger waste items or litter “hot spots” you spotted during your clean up so we can flag it for further attention.

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Province sets out what is expected of Boards of Education - Remote, Synchronous learning and Asynchronous learning.

News 100 blueBy Staff

August 14th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

For those who want to get deeply into the weeds on just what the province is telling the school boards what they are required to do the Memorandum from the Ministry to the Boards wiill be interesting.

Purpose

The Ministry of Education is committed to ensuring that students1 across Ontario receive a consistent approach to remote learning in times of extended interruption to conventional in-person learning, such as when public health emergencies, pandemics, natural disasters, or other unplanned events force the closure of classrooms or schools.

This memorandum provides direction to school boards2 on remote learning requirements, including implementation and reporting. This memorandum also identifies effective practices that school boards should develop to support students during remote learning.

Classroom - young kids

Classes like this will be difficult to hold.

During full or partial school closures, or under any other periods of remote learning, it is crucial to keep students engaged in their learning. Students should have access to a school community, a support network, and authentic educational experiences in order to continue to progress in their learning.

This memorandum must be implemented in alignment with collective agreements. Where there is a conflict between the memorandum and a collective agreement, the collective agreement must prevail.
Definitions of “Remote”, “Synchronous”, and “Asynchronous” Learning

In the context of this memorandum, “remote learning”, “synchronous learning”, and “asynchronous learning” mean the following:

Remote learning: Learning that occurs when classes are taught at a distance and when students and educators are not in a conventional classroom setting. Remote learning takes place in times of extended interruption to in-person learning – for example, as a result of a pandemic or natural disaster. Classes can be synchronous or asynchronous and can be taught online through a Learning Management System (LMS) or by using videoconferencing tools. In some cases, they may be delivered through emails, print materials, broadcast media, or telephone calls.

Synchronous learning: Learning that happens in real time. Synchronous learning involves using text, video, or voice communication in a way that enables educators and other members of the school- or board-based team to instruct and connect with students in real time. Synchronous learning supports the well-being and academic achievement of all students, including students with special education needs, by providing educators and students with an interactive and engaging way to learn. It helps teachers provide immediate feedback to students and enables students to interact with one another.

Asynchronous learning: Learning that is not delivered in real time. Asynchronous learning may involve students watching pre-recorded video lessons, completing assigned tasks, or contributing to online discussion boards.
Remote Learning Requirements for School Boards

It's not the kind of high school you were used to - MORE HERE

Classes like this won’t take place as long as the pandemic is with us.

 

2. Minimum Requirements for Synchronous Learning

During periods of remote learning where students are at home for more than three days in a given week, boards must ensure that students are provided with synchronous learning. The minimum requirements for synchronous learning help to ensure that students have access to both synchronous and asynchronous learning opportunities.

The scheduled synchronous learning sessions must be communicated to parents and students. Educators should use their professional judgement to provide some flexibility to students on an individual basis when students are unable to participate in synchronous learning.

The table below outlines the minimum amount of time per day that students, depending on their grade level, must be provided with synchronous learning as part of their scheduled or timetabled learning.

Division Grade Level of Students Daily Minimum Synchronous Learning Time Requirement*

Elementary Kindergarten 180 minutes
Grades 1 to 3   225 minutes
Grades 4 to 8   225 minutes
Secondary Grades 9 to 12 The higher of 60 minutes for each 75-minute class period** or 225 minutes per day for a full course schedule

* This is in addition to asynchronous learning time.
** The synchronous learning time requirement for any period that is not 75 minutes should be adjusted to reflect this ratio.

The synchronous learning time requirements outlined in the table above may be divided into shorter periods throughout the school day. For example, a child in Kindergarten may participate in an opening exercise for 10 minutes with their whole class, as well as a combination of whole-group and small-group sessions throughout the school day, and a 10-minute closing exercise with their class at the end of the school day.

It is expected that synchronous learning will be provided for large and small groups of students each day, in a manner similar to in-person classroom teaching. Synchronous learning time may include students working independently and in small groups while engaged in a virtual classroom with the teacher overseeing their learning and available for questions. The synchronous learning requirements are a part of the 300-minute instructional day during which teachers remain available to students as per the previous section “Minimum Requirements for Engaging Students during Remote Learning.”

Additional group meetings may take place between educators and students as needed to address specific learning needs. Where students are able to attend in-person classes and also participate in remote learning, school boards should plan, where possible, to assign different educators to facilitate both formats of instruction. This will ensure that students are engaged in their learning with appropriate levels of support.

3. Process for Exemption from Synchronous Learning

School boards must allow for students to be exempted from the minimum requirements for synchronous learning stated above, on an individual basis.

School boards must develop a process to obtain and acknowledge the receipt of exemption forms. Requests for an exemption must be made in writing. Exemption from synchronous learning may be requested by parents or by students who are 18 years of age or older, and students who are 16 or 17 years of age but have withdrawn from parental control.

Boys with clarinets

Social for sure – but no distancing. School is not going to be the same.

To support meaningful access to education, alternative learning approaches must be put in place for all exempted students – for example, correspondence, print, or broadcast media instruction that is based on the individual student’s needs and circumstances. Additional supports for parents should also be considered. Exempted students must be provided with a daily schedule or timetable in accordance with the 300-minute instructional day.

4. Protocols for Delivering Remote Learning

School boards must ensure that the delivery of remote learning includes the following elements:

Communication Processes

School boards must inform students and parents about remote learning requirements, including the process for exemption from synchronous learning, and expectations for student attendance and engagement.
School boards should clearly communicate a process whereby parents can inform the school of any issues that their child may be experiencing with remote learning, and provide steps that parents may take to resolve any issues.
Teachers should communicate with the principal, students, and parents a regular schedule of synchronous learning sessions that fulfills the minimum time requirements, as part of their remote learning timetable. Teachers should accommodate parents who request a meeting through other modes (e.g., by telephone, through a virtual platform) when an in-person meeting is not possible.

Differentiated Assessment and Instruction

Teachers should provide daily opportunities for each student to receive meaningful feedback.

The policy outlined in Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools, 2010 continues to apply during periods of remote learning and teachers should employ assessment for, as, and of learning (including diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment), as required.

Teachers should provide differentiated support to all students, including English and French Language Learners, and students with special education needs who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP).

Supporting Students with Special Education Needs

Where appropriate, educators should provide more opportunities than the minimum requirements for synchronous learning for students with special education needs, based on their individual strengths and needs, and provide differentiated support and instruction.

Educators should continue to provide accommodations, modified expectations, and alternative programming to students with special education needs, as detailed in their IEPs. If it is not possible to meet a student’s needs through synchronous learning, educators and families will work together to find solutions.

School boards are encouraged to provide continued access to assistive technology, including Special Equipment Amount (SEA) equipment, where possible, to support students with special education needs as they participate in remote learning. In situations where access to assistive technology is not feasible, educators are expected to work with students and parents to determine workable solutions on an individual basis.

Student Attendance and Safety

Student attendance must be taken daily at the elementary level and per course at the secondary level. Principals must ensure that student attendance records are submitted and that a staff member is assigned to contact parents in the case of an unexpected absence, in accordance with school and board attendance protocols.
In cases where a student is unable to participate in a synchronous learning session – for example, their device may be shared with a parent in the home – teachers should be informed, and they should make curriculum and assessment accommodations on an individual basis.

Boards may review how attendance counsellors could be used to further support student attendance, engagement, and well-being.

Boards must ensure that teachers follow school board-established procedures related to online safety, privacy, and cyber security.

5. Access to Remote Learning Devices – such as Laptops or Tablets – and the Internet

School boards must work collaboratively with parents to ensure that all students have access to remote learning devices and the Internet during remote learning. School boards are expected to provide remote learning devices and Internet connectivity to students who do not otherwise have access to them, and to develop policies on how these resources will be allocated on an equitable basis.

In situations where students do not have access to remote learning devices or the Internet, and a school board is unable to provide this support, school boards should have a process in place to work collaboratively with students and parents to establish alternative arrangements on an individual basis.

School boards should also consider how to support students in Education and Community Partnership Programs (ECPPs), including students in youth justice ECPPs, where access to the Internet may not be available or may be restricted due to a court order.

Teachers should work from a school or board facility during remote learning, where possible, with reasonable accommodations if required. If this is not possible, teachers should maintain regular communication with the principal. School boards should support educators in accessing remote learning devices and tools to support remote and synchronous instruction.
6. Standardized Suite of Synchronous Learning Platforms

School boards must provide teachers with a standardized suite of synchronous learning platforms to ensure that students have a consistent learning experience, and provide teachers with training on these platforms. The platforms will allow real-time communication between educators, students, and parents during remote learning.

Synchronous learning platforms should include live video, audio, and chat features and be fully accessible. To support student safety and well-being, school boards should consider providing a tool that allows educators to control student microphones and cameras. School boards may also wish to consider synchronous learning platforms that include virtual whiteboards, recording features, participant polling features, and file uploading and sharing features.

7. Cyber Security, Privacy, and Online Safety

Ensuring the protection of privacy and the cyber security of educators, students, and parents is paramount to supporting a safe and inclusive learning environment for remote learning.

School boards must review their cyber security and privacy policies, and develop updates related to remote learning. These policies must include clear protocols and procedures for educators to follow so that they can ensure student safety and security during remote learning. These protocols must be clearly communicated to educators, students, and parents.

Board protocols should ensure that students and educators do not share passwords, that student initials are used for account creation instead of full names, that teachers are the last ones to leave synchronous learning sessions, and that students and teachers are aware of and respect board policies regarding digital conduct and privacy.

School boards should provide professional resources to all school staff to increase cyber security awareness.
Effective Practices

To support students and educators during periods of remote learning, school boards should develop effective practices, including:

providing technical support for remote learning
providing educator training
using standardized platforms
setting out roles and responsibilities

1. Providing Technical Support for Remote Learning

School boards should provide technical support to educators, students, and parents for the use of board-provided devices and access to the Internet during remote learning.

Technical support should be responsive to immediate needs. It should assist users who have specific technological problems and questions. In the context of remote learning, technical support should span the full spectrum of users’ technological needs, including devices, connectivity, security, and digital learning tools and applications.

Board staff, educators, students, and parents should know where to seek help when they encounter technical issues during remote learning. School boards should provide clear information on who can provide help (e.g., board staff, service providers), and how users can access that help (e.g., by email, telephone).

2. Providing Educator Training

Educators should have access to subject- and division-specific training to support remote learning.

School boards should deliver remote learning strategies and educator training related to:

student and staff safety;
student and parent comfort levels with technology, and the levels of support that may be required;
effective use of digital tools;
effective pedagogy and assessment;
student and staff mental health and well-being;
accessibility and differentiated instruction for all students, including students with special education needs.

3. Using Standardized Platforms

Educators should use board-approved synchronous learning platforms that are fully accessible.

Principals should ensure that educators have access to a suite of appropriate technology products, tools, and resources to support the delivery of remote learning. To ensure that students have a consistent learning experience, the maximum number of synchronous learning platforms used within a school should be three, where possible.
4. Setting Out Roles and Responsibilities

School boards should consider the rights and responsibilities of students, parents, teachers, educational assistants, early childhood educators, and other school and board staff during remote learning.

Teachers are expected to carry out the instructional duties assigned to them by their principals and to comply with all professional standards and obligations under the Education Act and the Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996. These include having responsibility for the effective instruction and evaluation of the progress of students in the subjects and classes assigned by the principal (including by electronic means), preparing and submitting lesson plans to the principal, and communicating regularly with parents.

Technology Enabled Learning and Teaching (TELT) contacts at each school board can play an active role in supporting communication of the policy, educator training, and implementation of remote and synchronous learning. For example, they can support the use of the ministry’s Virtual Learning Environment, which provides educators with training related to digital learning tools.
Implementation

School boards must ensure that the requirements outlined in this memorandum are implemented by the beginning of the 2020-21 school year.

School boards are encouraged to consider local needs and circumstances, and to consult with local partners in their implementation of remote learning. In the French-language education system, the implementation of remote and synchronous learning should take into account Ontario’s aménagement linguistique policy and support the vitality of the French-language culture in a minority setting.
Monitoring and Evaluation

School boards are required to report at the end of the school year on their activities to fulfill the direction outlined in this memorandum.

School boards are expected to develop and implement a process for regular data collection, and to collect data related, but not limited, to:

areas in which educators require additional support in implementing remote learning, including providing student and educator access to technology and the Internet;

strategies to provide training related to the identified areas of need, including learning and well-being;
details of implementation progress and monitoring activities, including the number of exemptions from synchronous learning and what alternative approaches were used;

parent and student feedback on the impact of remote learning, including:

level of student engagement in learning;

ease of online learning participation;

access to teachers;

ease and access to technology;

information on how parent and student feedback is being taken into account in the delivery of remote learning.

Data covering the school year must be provided to the ministry no later than July 31 of each year in which there are periods of remote learning.

School boards are expected to make adjustments to their implementation of the requirements in this memorandum based on parent, student, and staff feedback collected throughout the school year.

Upon request of the ministry, school boards may be required to report on the following data during the school year:

for any given calendar month, the number of students engaged in remote learning;
for any given calendar month, the number of students provided with the minimum requirements for synchronous learning;
for any given calendar month, the number of students exempted from the minimum requirements for synchronous learning.

1 In this memorandum, unless otherwise stated, student(s) includes children in Kindergarten and students in Grades 1 to 12.
2 In this memorandum school board(s) and board(s) refer to district school boards, school authorities, and Provincial and Demonstration Schools (including the schools operated by the Centre Jules-Léger Consortium).
3 In this memorandum, parent(s) refers to parent(s) and guardian(s).

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Is it just about getting your name in the paper? This latest is pathetic.

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

August 12th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was pathetic.

The media release was from the Office of the Mayor. She was exited about the change in the name of a committee that is part of AMO – Association of Municipalities in Ontario,

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward was acclaimed recently as a member of LUMCO – Large Urban Mayors’ Caucus of Ontario

They recently changed their named to Ontario’s Big City Mayors and that was important enough to put out a media release.

Really?

“LUMCO is excited to announce its new name: Ontario’s Big City Mayors (OBCM).  While the name has changed, our mission remains the same: to represent the interests of Ontario’s 29 biggest cities, and almost 70% of Ontarians, through public policy development, advocacy and discussion.

OBCM - LUMCO Mayor“Ontario’s Big City Mayors (OBCM) is comprised of mayors of Ontario cities with populations of 100,000 or more.

“OBCM provides a voice for big city mayors in policy debates that impact Ontario cities. Through policy development, advocacy, discussion and partnerships, Ontario’s Big City Mayors support strong and effective cities.”

The Mayor and two of her Council members did themselves proud earlier this week last week when they “took a knee” at the Black Lives Matter graphic painted on the sidewalk outside city hall.

BLM 3 JAmes and Brant

Thousands of young people marched on city hall to show their support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

MMW The Knee

The Mayor and two Councillors did the “taking a knee” gesture beside the Black Lives Matter outside city hall.

The graphic had relevance – especially after the march of several thousand people who demonstrated outside city hall a number of months ago.

But “taking a knee”? That is a gesture we see at sports events in the United States where people of colour in the sports sector have been poorly treated for decades.

“Taking a knee” in that venue makes sense and has an impact.

In Burlington a passer-by might well ask: ‘What are they doing’?

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Rick Craig the man that gave the shirt off his back - part of his mission to make everyone on the planet know about Terry Fox.

The Terry Fox Run for Cancer Research, an annual event in Burlington since 1981, won’t take place this year – the social distancing rules determined by the COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t permit large gatherings. And Terry Fox events are very large gatherings.

There is a collection of people who have done outstanding community service to grow the event to the point where they have raised $2.2 million.

They were not prepared to just let the event dribble away – it was going to take more than a pandemic to close them down.

The committee running the virtual event this year has taken a very creative approach to informing the community and telling parts of the unknown story.

Profiles of the people who got the event to where it is today appear on the Terry Fox Burlington Facebook page and are being republished by the Gazette with permission.

 

News 100 blueBy Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee

August 12th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Meet Rick Craig

Craig at the statue in the west

Rick on the right, Gerry on the left at the Terry Fox monument

For me, Rick Craig has always been the quiet, but thoughtful committee member who does our accounting. He would pass around financial statements at meetings and tell us how healthy our bank account was. Do we need to hold another fundraiser this year, or can we afford to wait another year? Rick had the answers. While he took on this role on the committee due to his background in the field, Terry Fox was more than just a number or a statistic to him.

Rick Craig was one of a few Burlington residents to see Terry run through Burlington on July 13, 1980.

terry-fox-lakeshore-19800713

Lakeshore Photo of Terry Fox running through Burlington on July 13, 1980.  Photo by Mark Mulholland

“Of course, I’d been following him all the way from Newfoundland, and so did my wife, and we heard he was coming through Burlington,” recalls Craig.

Rick made his way down to Lakeshore Road around 8:30 a.m., before work, with the hopes of catching a glimpse of this incredible young man he had been following in the news. His wife, Gerry, was on Plains Road, with the couple’s young daughter.

“I remember it was a bit of a foggy morning, and he hadn’t come along…at the time I thought he’d come along, so I was thinking I had to get to work, and ‘should I stay?’ And I said, ‘I’m going to stay,’ and all of a sudden there he was coming out of the fog.”

Joining the Committee

Rick Craig is a community-minded guy. He’s friendly and always willing to lend a hand. It’s with this spirit of generosity that he sought out new opportunities to get involved in Burlington events. Years ago, he and Gerry saw an article in the local newspaper asking for volunteers to join the Burlington organizing committee. The year Rick joined there was a small but motivated group. He had fun that first year and has been helping ever since.

When reflecting on why he’s stuck with it all these years, Rick said, “I do it for the cause, but I also do it for Terry.”

Rick with George

Rick Craig (on the right) with volunteer George Schroeder

The Organizers Workshop

Aside from the September run, the event that Rick looks forward to the most is the annual Terry Fox Organizers Workshop in Toronto. Here, representatives from run sites all across Ontario gather on a Saturday in May to watch presentations from other organizers, doctors, scientists, cancer survivors and other special guest speakers. There’s a barbecue lunch, raffle prizes (where Rick lucked out and won several the year I joined him), but at the end of the day you leave feeling humbled, hopeful and more determined than ever. You literally laugh and cry throughout the day. It’s pretty special.

“I’ve been to about eight of them,” said Craig, “and each time you leave inspired to get going.”

The Cuban Connection

Rick and Gerry Craig are avid travellers. At least they were, pre-COVID. During our chat, Rick shared a story about a trip they took to Cuba around 2010. Rick, like many long-time committee members, has a large collection of Terry Fox t-shirts. Wearing one of his many shirts, he went to a local market with Gerry and caught the attention of one merchant.

Shirt off his back

Rick Craig went back to his hotel and packed up his shirt to gift to her.

The woman at the stand said, “Terry Fox!” And Rick replied, “Oh you know [about] Terry Fox?” She said, “Yes, I run every year.”

He asked her if she had a shirt and she said no, so he went back to his hotel and packed up his shirt to give to her.

In exchange for his kindness, she gifted Rick and Gerry with some of her wooden carvings. They of course refused, but she insisted. The carvings are special mementos from that trip.

Rick took a photo with the merchant and her “new” shirt to remember this special moment. This story truly shows the global reach Terry Fox has these days. What started as a uniquely Canadian event in the 1980s is now happening all over the world.
Rick giving the shirt off his back to a vendor in Cuba.

Family Man

Though Rick has experienced many wonderful things during his years of involvement in the Burlington Terry Fox Run, one of his favourite memories was seeing his kids run by him on the course. Though he won’t be volunteering along the route this year, he still plans to participate in his own neighbourhood.

While he’s not a runner, he plans to ride his bike for the 2020 Terry Fox Run and collect donations just like he would any other year.

Thank you Rick (and Gerry) for your continued support and unwavering dedication to the cause!

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Bruce Trail paintings from the brushes of Janet Jardine, Anne More and Victoria Pearce to be shown at The Hub in September.

artsorange 100x100By Staff

August 9th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Fine Arts Association has some exciting news.

Jardine in B&W

Janet Jardine – in her spiffy 5th Avenue look.

Janet Jardine, along with artists Victoria Pearce and Anne More, will be featuring art inspired by scenes along the Bruce Trail at The HUB in Burlington Centre, (formerly the Burlington Mall) from September 19 to 25.

The group got the go-ahead to use the venue for their fundraiser show benefiting the Bruce Trail Conservancy.

Jardine is learning online methods to offer a virtual presentation of the art show as well (date[s] to be confirmed) for those who are not comfortable or able to attend in person.

30% of the proceeds from the show will go to the Conservancy. 10% to Burlington Fine Arts Association.

Jardine painting

Mind Your Step! Buffalo Crag Lookout, Rattlesnake Point Conservation Area by Janet Jardine.

Stay tuned for more details on how it will all work, and sneak peeks.

Jardine saw it as: “… such a beautiful winter walk and view, though I was happy to have spikes on my boots that day!

“The Bruce Trail brought us out to this icy patch at the Buffalo Crag Lookout at Rattlesnake Point Conservation Area. Good spot for a railing.

“In the distance, a portion of the Niagara Escarpment arises, a view toward Mount Nemo Conservation Area.

“I love winter hikes. How about you?”

Prints will be made available, starting at the same time as the September show.

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Black Lives Matter iconography has been painted on the sidewalk in front of City Hall.

News 100 yellowBy Staff

August 9th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Pride Crosswalk went in about a month ago – this month the Black Lives Matter iconography has been painted on the sidewalk in front of City Hall.

There was an informal presentation with the Mayor and two Councillors (Nisan and Galbraith) today at 11:30 am.

Surprisingly, there were no people of colour on hand to take part.

Black lives 1

The artist took the statement a little beyond just words.

Black lives 2

The Mayor, properly masked, speaking to residents and giving the Black Lives Matter iconography a little official touch.

The artist was present at the time; she wishes to remain anonymous.

The names written on the large white letters are the names of Canadian and American people.

The painting is acrylic base and will remain until mid September 2020.

Another Burlington inclusivity statement. When the city take the steps to ensure that affordable housing is built in the city we will have moved beyond statements.

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Culture Days will last a month this year - everything will be done virtually. This could get interesting!

eventsorange 100x100By Staff

August 6th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City is going virtual and is calling for local artists, cultural professionals and creative organizations to host free, interactive online events and activities during the 11th annual Culture Days.

Scarecrows from the Burlington Student Theatre were on hand to see the Burlington Performing Arts Cnetrte handed over to the community.

Scarecrows from the Burlington Student Theatre were on hand to see the Burlington Performing Arts Centre handed over to the community. Might we see them on our computer screens?

Culture Days is extending beyond the traditional Culture Days weekend to a more inclusive and interactive four-week schedule of activities. Kicking off Sept. 25 and running until Oct. 25, Culture Days invites everyone to participate in and show appreciation for arts and culture in their own community and nationwide.

This year’s theme is Unexpected Intersections – encouraging creative and outside-the-box thinking to reveal new avenues of discovery, learning, and expression. In light of the current situation with COVID-19, Culture Days recommends digital presentations, do-it-yourself activities and self-guided programs.

Culture days - Burlington markThe Culture Days website encourages creators of every kind to showcase thousands of virtual and in-person activities. Visitors can find small-gathering or self-guided events near them, while going digital allows participants to virtually cross the country and discover live-streamed performances and other online presentations.

Culture Days encourages organizers to plan digital presentations. For in-person events, organizers should take a self-guided or pre-registered, limited capacity approach. Organizers must make sure they are following municipal, regional, provincial and public health guidelines in their jurisdiction. Ontario Culture Days has created resource pages for organizers and ways to discover Ontario arts and culture from home for audiences.

Event organizers may be eligible for funding through the Community Support Fund. The Community Support Fund combines existing grant programs to provide financial support to residents and community groups who want to enrich and connect the Burlington community through sport, recreation, art and cultural experiences. This is a one-time per year funding program designed to recognize the importance of supporting Burlington’s communities during these challenging times. By providing access to funding, the City is looking for innovative ideas to connect and enhance our community through events and activities that offer meaningful opportunities to strengthen and nourish community spirit.

If you would like to host a Culture Days event, register your event online with Culture Days at culturedays.ca. For more information about participating in Culture Days, assistance on finding a location for your activity, and possible partnership opportunities with the cultural boards, contact Adam Belovari at 905-335-7600, ext. 7335 or adam.belovari@burlington.ca by Aug. 31.

About Culture Days
Culture Days has become the largest cultural event in Canada, attracting an estimated 2.5 million annual attendees to thousands of free activities and performances hosted by artists, cultural organizations and municipalities in hundreds of communities across Canada. Burlington has been a little slow in getting on the Culture Days bandwagon – perhaps the virtual approach will be the nudge people need to take part.

Councillor Sharma n speaking to Angela Paparizo

Councillor Sharma in conversation with Angela Paparizo

Angela Paparizo, Manager, Arts and Culture urges residents to think about taking part: “As we plan for Burlington’s Culture Days in the midst of COVID-19, this is an opportunity for Burlington artists and cultural organizations to showcase their talents and engage our community. While Culture Days this year will look different, we have a rare chance to share Burlington’s arts and cultural community beyond our city. I encourage and look forward to once again working with the Burlington arts and culture community to present another successful Culture Days this year.”

Links and Resources
Culturedays.ca
Burlington.ca/culturedays
Community Support Fund

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Burlington Foundation comes through for 18 community groups

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 28th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

How do you spend $350,000 + in a hurry?

You give it away – which is just what the Burlington Foundation did when it announced it has awarded $335,370 in grants to 18 charities to address critical needs affecting vulnerable community members in Burlington greatly impacted by COVID-19. The grants announced today are part of the Emergency Community Support Fund (ECSF), funded by the Government of Canada.

The ECSF is a $350 million fund that is being implemented with Community Foundations of Canada, in partnership with local foundations across the country, the Canadian Red Cross and United Way Centraide Canada. Its goal is to provide support to charities and non-profit organizations serving vulnerable Canadians.

BCF logo“The tremendous impact the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have on our vulnerable community members and our front-line charities serving them, is truly unprecedented,” said Colleen Mulholland, President and CEO of Burlington Foundation. “We’re proud to have participated in the ECSF partnership with Community Foundations of Canada, the Government of Canada and other community partners, as together, we are stronger in bringing critical support at the local level to those most in need.”

BCF Mulholland + sign new logo

Colleen Mulholland, President and CEO of Burlington Foundation at the launch of the new corporate graphic.

All of these outstanding initiatives support our most vulnerable citizens including seniors, children and youth, community members with disabilities and those suffering from mental health crisis, and persons experiencing food insecurity or unsafe housing situations.

“Since the pandemic began to impact our community in March, Burlington Foundation’s priority has been on helping our front-line charities and our vulnerable community members that they serve,” says Colleen Mulholland. “Together, through the federal ECSF program, as well as Burlington Foundation’s own Covid-19 Pandemic Response Fund made possible by generous Foundation donors and fundholders, we are so pleased to have granted $560,040 over the past four months to local charities.”

 

Foundation 1

 

Foundation 2

foundation 3

foundation 4

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Terry Fox and the Carden girls

terry-fox-running-across-from-monument

Terry Fox running through Burlington on his Marathon of Hope in 1980. The lives of millions of Canadians were changed forever by the courage of a very young man.

The Terry Fox Run for Cancer Research, an annual event in Burlington since 1981, won’t take place this year – the social distancing rules determined by the COVID19 pandemic doesn’t permit large gatherings. And Terry Fox events are very large gatherings

There is a collection of people who have done outstanding community service to grow the event to the point where they have raised $2.2 million.

They were not prepared to just let the event dribble away – it was going to take more than a pandemic to close them down.
The committee running the virtual event this year has taken a very creative approach to informing the community and telling parts of the unknown story.

Profiles of the people who got the event to where it is today appear on the Terry Fox Burlington Facebook page and are being republished by the Gazette with permission.

 

By Burlington Terry Fox Run Committee
July 28th, 2020
BURLINGTON, ON

carden family on promenade

The Camden’s: Isabelle, Grace Sean and Tanya sitting in Spencer Smith Park.

It’s been over three years since the Carden girls, Grace, now 11, and Isabelle, now 9, asked their parents if they could have a lemonade stand. Parents, Tanya and Sean resisted, but the girls kept asking, as young children often do, and a compromise was made.

Izzy and Grace could have a lemonade stand in their complex, but only if the money went towards a charitable cause. Mom, Tanya Blizzard-Carden, had already signed up for the Burlington Terry Fox Run, so it was settled that that would be their cause of choice.

Armed with markers, the girls made signs and the family whipped up some lemonade and a few baked goods to sell. The event was such a success that they decided to make it an annual fundraiser.

Sisters Grace and Isabelle
Upping their game (with a little help and support)
Due to the popularity of the baked goods, Tanya had to expand their menu. Several family members got involved to bake. Last year they even added gluten-free options to make it more inclusive. Everything sold!

As you can imagine, when a simple lemonade stand expands beyond one’s expectations, and you’re donating all the money to charity, it gets expensive. Sean and Tanya recognized that they needed some help. Isabelle and Grace approached the local No Frills and the owner was happy to supply them with the ingredients they needed to bake and make lemonade and iced tea.

Carden girls with lemonade stand

The Carden girls were out there selling their lemonade to support the Terry Fox Run for a Cure for Cancer.

The family also got a lot of support from Burlington Dads, a community group of local dads that Sean Carden is a member of. Many of the Burlington Dads showed up from all across the city and donated 10, 20, 50 even a 100 dollars to the cause after Sean told them what the girls were doing.

Last year, a family friend who’s a firefighter showed up at the lemonade stand with a fire truck, which was fun for the kids.

Why Terry Fox?
The Terry Fox Run was a natural fit for the Cardens, as they had personally been touched by cancer, as many of us are. They were also looking for an organization that they could support as a family.

The Burlington Terry Fox run is a very inclusive event. We welcome people of all ages and abilities to take part. For Tanya and Sean it was nice that they could all do it together.

What about 2020?
Due to the current Covid-19 situation, the Carden family knows that there cannot be a lemonade stand this year. However, as a family they are determined to do something to raise money for Terry Fox.

When I asked them if they had any advice for people facing difficulties this year, Sean had this to say:

CArden girls with fire fighters

Burlington Fire Fighters dropped by for a cool one.

“This year has been strange on so many levels. I’ve said to people, ‘we’re figuring this out together.’ No one knows what’s going to happen next week, but we deal with it together. If Terry Fox and the Foundation is something you have supported, either financially or getting out and doing the walk or run, in the past, stick with it. Even though it’s not going to be the same, it will be some semblance of normal.”

And Isabelle said that she would want to do the run on any day because she just wants to help people. Her final message to me was that she just wants everyone to be happy and safe. With comments like those, you can tell she will be a Terry Foxer for life.

 

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Region Releases Community Investment Fund Grants for 2020

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

July 27th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

werfgt

Halton Regional government offices are located in Oakville

The Halton Region Community Investment Fund (HRCIF) supports a wide range of non-profit health and social service programs that enhance the health, safety and well-being of Halton residents.

The Fund provides one-year and multi-year grants to programs and initiatives through two categories of funding and is part of Halton’s overall approach to community safety and well-being planning.

Funding from the Federal and Provincial governments is included in programs that support the health, safety and well-being of residents as the community recovers from the impact of COVID-19.

Applications for single year and multiple year funding for 2020 have closed the Region released the programs that are funded.

• $193,340 to Wesley Urban Ministries to support case management and rehousing efforts for single individuals across Halton.

• $176,230 to Food for Life to expand food access points, deliver food boxes to high needs households and provide outreach programming.

• $67,937 to Acclaim Health to support the well-being and lessen the isolation of older adults.

• $29,869 to Canadian Mental Health Association – Halton Region Branch to provide free counselling for residents 16 years old and older.

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Look for tents to be set up to help the hospitality sector recover from the lockdown and limitations they had to live with during Stage 2.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

July 27th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There have been 38 applications for patios on private property and 12 on city property for outdoor locations where people can dine and enjoy a cool one.

There are a number of applications in process.

tents

Dining alfresco in downtown Burlington: it will be interesting to see how creative the restaurateurs can get.

The city is now going to consider allowing temporary tents as well.

The bylaw that is in place for outdoor patios has to be repealed first and a new bylaw out in place.

Council will meet as a Standing Committee Tuesday morning and will then meet as a Council and approve the new bylaw.

Let’s see how that goes. We will of course report on how this works out. There are a few locations that are in the process of erecting tents – which suggests this is a done deal.

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Stage 3 means children can use the playground equipment - note - it will not be sanitized by the city.

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A real summer for Burlington seemed to have to wait until we got into Stage 3 – Playground equipment can now be used.  Restaurants will invite patrons inside and parks will be more accessible.

Beachway Chld-Fest-2013-Family-sand-castle-1024x733

Events like this on the beach aren’t going to be part of this summer.

That playground equipment is not being sanitized and standard health practices with heightened awareness such as staying home if sick, washing hands and not touching faces should be strictly followed. Parents and caregivers are advised to pack hand sanitizer as well as sunscreen.

Anyone using the playground equipment should still practice physical distancing of two metres with anyone not from their household or their social circle.

If a playground structure is busy, residents may want to consider one of Burlington’s many other parks or come back at another time.
Other Summer Activities

• Parks are open for casual use, such as exercising, picnics, kicking or throwing a ball

• Mountainside, Nelson and LaSalle Pools are open for leisure swims and lap swims with online pre-registration and payment only. Splash Parks at Nelson and Mountainside Pools are now open as well

Kids + water = fun and noise - all part of the Halton Children's Water Festival. A full day of fun at a cost of $5 per student.

Kids + water = fun and noise.

• Spray pads at parks are open

• Lowville Park is open. New, as of July 30, entry to Lowville Park will require pre-registration through parkvisit.ca/burlington. Reservations and use of the park remain free

• Redesigned summer camps are open. The next registration date is July 27 at 9 a.m. View camps at burlington.ca/summer

• Redesigned Adult 19+ and Adult 55+ programs are open. View programs at burlington.ca/summer.

Safety Precautions

• All City recreation programs are operating with public health safety precautions including increased cleaning (outdoor amenities like playgrounds are not sanitized), screening and reduced program capacities in place to help slow the spread of COVID-19

• Permits for picnics will not be issued in an effort to mitigate large gatherings at this time

• Physical distancing of two metres is still in place on public property with anyone not from your household or social circle and in groups of less than 10.

The Regional Public Health Unit will issue a report at the end of next week – we can expect a bit of an increase iin the number of people reported to be infected.  If that number is very high the provincial government may decide that we are not yet ready for Stage 3 and roll us back to Stage 2.

The virus is transferred from person to person – it is up to us to do everything we can to ensure that we each, individually, are not part of that transfer process.

Or are we going to be really, really stupid and drink the KoolAid?

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Joseph Brant Museum open - also offering virtual programming.

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

July 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

Joseph Brant Museum offering Virtual Visits for Kids

museum virtual visits week 6What is a virtual visit and why would you want to do one?

The Joseph Brant Museum has a daily one hour Zoom session featuring live instruction by a Museum Educator who guides a series of creative, hands-on activities that relate to a weekly theme. Next week’s theme is the “Age of Exploration”.

Cost: $25/week. Programs are designed for children aged 8-12, parental supervision may be required for some activities. Register today and pick up the activity bag tomorrow at Joseph Brant Museum from 10:00 am to 3:30 pm.

Registration right HERE

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Quarry application for new licenses is complete - the JART review process can begin - public participation will be included.

News 100 greenBy Pepper Parr

July 22nd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Now to serious part can begin.

Nelson Aggregates advised the public earlier today that their application for new licenses to expand the area they are quarrying has been deemed complete by both the city and the Region.

That means the application can now go to the JART (Joint Administrative Review Tribunal) for a hearing and be judged on its merits.

Beach 1

The lake that Nelson Aggregates claim will be created when the quarry has been mined out.

Nelson President Quinn Moyer said that “The best experts in their fields spent two years preparing this application and ensuring it met or exceeded all standards. “We are pleased the Region and the City have determined the 5,000-page application is comprehensive and will move to the formal review stage.”

As part of the application, 19 independent studies examining the expansion’s potential impact on all aspects of the environment, from water to noise, conclude it would meet all provincial standards and have no adverse environmental impact.

Nelson Aggregates say that “This quarry has played an important role as Burlington’s main source of local gravel for more than 50 years. Expanding the quarry will help Burlington and Halton meet their growing needs for roads, homes and schools in an environmentally sustainable manner.”

The studies concluded “the proposed Burlington Quarry Extension is located where policy anticipates extraction to occur; appropriately balances economic, environmental and social considerations; and represents good planning taking into account provincial, regional and municipal planning policies.”

Map showing all

The land that is the issue

“This is a legacy project,” said Moyer, “one that will help Burlington and Halton grow sustainably over the next generation, and then give future generations the environmental and health benefits of a large urban park.”

The proposed park would be 5.7 times larger than Burlington’s City View Park, and would be donated to the public in stages following approval. The size and scale of the park would allow for abundant recreational opportunities, from biking and swimming to rock climbing and soccer.

The process for quarry expansion applications is laid out in the Aggregate Resources of Ontario Act, Provincial Standards. The Provincial Standards contain a set of standard application criteria for licence and aggregate permits.

No Quarry signThere is a community organization opposed to any further development of a quarry.  CORE: Conserving our Rural Ecosystems does not want to see the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve on the Niagara Escarpment infringed upon.

Mayor Meed Ward issued a Statement as well setting out the process and adding: “On July 20, 2020, after a thorough review and consultation with the Joint Agency Review Team (JART) partners, the Region’s Chief Planning Official has deemed the application to amend the Regional Official Plan complete. City of Burlington staff have also deemed the companion Local Official Plan Amendment applications complete on July 20, 2020.

There will be a report on the September Halton Regional Council agenda that will profile key aspects of the application submission and will highlight for Council the next steps, including the work being undertaken by JART and opportunities for engagement and public input. The Region’s website will be updated to ensure the most up-to-date information is provided.

The city of Burlington has created a dedicated webpage for all materials and reports related to the Quarry Expansion application. You can find that here: https://www.burlington.ca/en/services-for-you/nelson-quarry-extension.asp.

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Rivers - takes his play on how people coped with quarantine during the lockdown. 18 and over only for this one.

eventsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

July 17th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Rivers hand to face

Ray Rivers

Ray Rivers, our political columnist is part farmer (he and his wife used to raise sheep) an academic and a thespian.

Strange Bedfellows – is his play about people coping with quarantine during the COVID 19 lockdown in Ontario. It is nothing less than an historical bookmark of this very scary period. The play is part of the Hamilton Fringe Stream Out Loud series running from July 21 to 26, 2020 and will only be accessible on-line.

This is the third production Ray Z Rivers has brought to the stage at Hamilton’s Fringe. Five actors, through the graces of the internet and ZOOM, each play their parts from their own homes as the play winds through its story.

Play dates are Tues July 21 @ 6:30pm – Fri July 24 @ 8:30pm – and Sat July 25 @ 9:10pm

Tickets are available at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/strange-bedfellows-at-what-the-fest-tickets-112334495500

Contact: Ray Rivers – rayzrivers@gmail.com – 905-659-2069

Note: This play is not recommended for those under 18 years of age.

Rivers Fringe Poster

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Joseph Brant Museum has officially re-opened.

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

July 15th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Giants, Dragons & Unicorns will be haunting the halls of the Joseph Brant Museum which is now officially open.

It is all part of the World of Mythic Creatures (organized by the American Museum of Natural History) that will be extended to January 3, 2021. Changes have been implemented to ensure the safety of our visitors, staff and volunteers. Learn more about what to expect and how to pre-book your visit on our website.

Museum re-opensThe Museums of Burlington is also offering a virtual summer program for kids. Virtual Visits are daily one hour Zoom sessions featuring live instruction by a Museum Educator who will guide a series of creative, hands-on, structured activities and crafts that relate to a weekly theme.

Programs are designed for children aged 8-12, parental supervision is required for some activities. Programs are one week in duration and take place from 11 am to 12 pm each day. The cost is $25/week and includes a craft supply bag.

How it works:

• Register online, you’ll receive an email receipt/confirmation.

• The week prior to the program start, you will receive the daily Zoom meeting links, daily itineraries and supply checklists.

• The Friday prior to the program start date, your supply bag will be packaged up and ready for pick-up at Joseph Brant Museum from 11 am to 3 pm. Please ensure you and your child prepare your supplies in advance so you’re ready to go for 11 am each day. There will be items required that are not included in the supply bag provided.

 

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Cedar Spring group doing the Terry Fox Run virtually.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

July 15th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Earlier this week, a group of people gathered at the Terry Fox monument in Spencer Smith Park.

It was the evening of July 13th – the anniversary of the day that Terry ran through Burlington in 1980.

2020 Team Cedar Springs

Members of the Cedar Springs gym who have been doing the Terry Fox Run for a Cure for Cancer for the past six years decided they would not let the official cancellation of the run stop them – they are doing the run virtually. Far left in terry shirt Craig Gardner next Daniel Zai down low Kristy Smith behind Daniel in white top Suzanne Sawell beside Suzanne in black top (hiding behind monument) Nancy Demerling Right side of monument Mary Cook-Hyslop down low behind her in red top Sheilagh O’Drsicoll to the right of Sheilagh Colleen Clairmont beside Colleen Beth Buttenham and beside Beth Lisa Drewry Missing from the picture Kevin Bita and Graham Oakley.

In 1981 Burlington citizens decided they would hold an annual run to raise funds for the Terry Fox Foundation to Cure Cancer. They have raised more than $2.2 million.

The runners and there are thousands of them tend to be both corporate teams and small groups.

One such group, a team from Cedar Springs gym has been doing the Terry Fox run for six years and have raised over $17K

With the annual run cancelled due to COVID19, the team went virtual with everyone on the team of ten walking, running, hiking starting June 1 and keeping track of their km’s with a goal of reaching 3582 km’s by July 13.

That was the number of km’s Terry Fox had run when he past the spot of the Terry Fox Marker in Burlington on July 13, 1980.

The team was able to surpass that number and this year so far have raised $1,575.

The team is looking for other teams to come forward with unique virtual challenges.

Craig Gardner is the Run coordinator this year. He is using social media and every ear he can bend to encourage people not to give up just because we are in the middle of a pandemic.

“Terry Fox did his best” said Gardner “we can do the same”. He added that it does mean being creative and looking for way to get the exercise you know you need and turn it into a fundraiser.

The Burlington Terry Fox organization has published a series of articles about the people who made the run it has become during the past 40 years.

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The city had a message on the use of the Beachway - many didn't see it quite that way.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

July 14th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is the story about what the city wanted to get across to people and how people reacted to messages they may not have heard.

rentals

Social distance was being observed for the most part.

As the hot summer temperatures continue, the City of Burlington continues to remind residents and visitors of some of the ways they can stay cool while continuing to protect the health and safety of the community and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

The problem is – the cool waters of Lake Ontario beckon – a part of town where there are more cars looking for a place to park than there are parking lots.

Beachway Park
Burlington’s beautiful waterfront at Beachway Park is a popular destination when temperatures are high, however, visitors to the beach are reminded:

Clothing was found in a pile in Beachway PArk - police seached land and water - no body recovered and no missing report filed.

Beachway – another of the city’s gems.

• The City of Burlington continues to be in a state of emergency due to COVID-19. Please continue to respect physical distancing measures at all times

• Keep two metres away from others (e.g. the length of a hockey stick) sitting on the beach and in the water

• Gather in groups of no more than 10 people who are part of your social circle

• Move to the right on the Waterfront trail to make room for others to pass safely.

The City will be taking some additional measures to educate residents and control parking around the Beachway. City of Burlington Park Ambassadors and Parking Enforcement Staff will also be in the vicinity to assist with these measures.

Increased Signage

Parking - took his chances

Not much more the city can do – if this vehicle got a ticket it amounted to $250.

Additional signs will be placed informing visitors of:
• No parking zones, tow away zones
• Cost of parking tickets on signs (where possible)
• “Parking lot full” signs at street entrances
• Physical distancing signs at more locations.

Parking at Beachway Park
Parking spaces at Beachway Park are limited and the lot fills quickly. Visitors are reminded to:

• Consider coming back another time if the parking lot is full, or parking their vehicle in an alternative location where parking is permitted and space exists on the beach to ensure physical distancing

• Avoid parking illegally – City bylaw officers will be enforcing ticketing and towing to discourage overcrowding at the beach.

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