It wasn't a raid but the police did shut down the Monster Mansion on Lakeshore at Goodram when they were getting disturbing behaviour reports.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 4th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Change only happens instantly on television.

The people in the Goodram – Lakeshore Road community are putting up with noise that would drive anyone bonkers – this at 2 am.

They have been asking for help for more than 18 months.

Lakeshore mega 4319 A view

The Monster Mansion that is being rented out via Air BnB was finally shut down by police – albeit well after midnight..

The efforts of their member of Council and a reach out to the police to step in has shut down the Air BnB operation that was the cause of all the concern.

Ward 4 Shawna Stolte said she has been pushing hard for relief for the residents in the area in regard to the troublesome AirBnB.
Saturday night was another big party with the police intervening multiple times and shutting the place down by 2am.

Councillor Stolte explains that: “The immensely frustrating challenge is that we have no jurisdiction to shut them down or enforce ceasing to operate as an AirBnB as we have no bylaw that speaks to this yet.

One option may have been to try to enact an immediate ban on all Short Term Accommodations in Burlington in order to catch this one…but that would have unfairly impacted the 160 other AirBnB’s in the city who are abiding by the rules and offering a great service.

Licensing will take a bit of time, it is being implemented by the Planning Department, who are so “under water” with the dramatically shortened timelines due to Bill 108 as well as the Official Plan and the Interim Control ByLaw timelines. Councillor Stolte said she “could have demanded something sooner but I know we would have ended up with an incomplete, not well thought out licensing bylaw.

“The property in question never would be granted a license to operate as they are anyhow…this situation is a matter of them using the guise of AirBnB to skirt the zoning bylaw and rent out a residential property as a commercial event venue.

“The fastest way to shut down this property is to take the legal approach re: residential zoning infraction which is what has been happening these last 6-8 weeks. We are well into this process and should see an impact any day now.

Shawna quiet

Shawna Stolte: Rookie Councillor who took on a defeated a double decade incumbent is proving to be very effective.

The Gazette had asked why the MAT (Municipal Accommodation Tax), was being considered at this time; she explained that “this is a completely separate issue that coincidentally just happens to include Short Term Accommodations. It is being spearheaded by the City Managers Office, not the Planning Dept. “Believe me, if I thought for one second that the Planning Department was taking time to implement the MAT instead of dealing with the Licensing Bylaw, well let me leave it at that.” She added that “I am holding the Planning Department’s feet to the fire as much as I can without running the risk of damaging things for a department that is struggling with the workload.

“The ultimate result is to get this AirBnB shut down by whatever means possible. As of Friday the advertisement for the offending property is gone from the AirBnB website. I had had contact with the AirBnB company as had a number of residents. Now AirBnB has banned all “party houses” after the shooting last week at a “party house” in California.

The residents may now finally have some peace and quiet on their street. Give the Councillor a kudos on this one.

Related news story:

City Council vows to take action

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The Christmas sales have begun - Halloween is being bumped to the side.

eventsgreen 100x100By Staff

October 30th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

And so it begins.

The Port Nelson United Church people remind us that Halloween may be two days away, but the Christmas season is in full swing at Port Nelson United Church!

Port Nelson sign Christmas 2019Port Nelson hosts the 67th annual Mistletoe Mart on Saturday, November 9, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. What makes this year even more special is that it’s the first Mistletoe Mart being held in the renovated church. After years of planning, designing and construction, Port Nelson can now display Christmas spirit in a bright, modern, accessible space that is just perfect for hosting Burlington’s favourite Christmas party!

“Come experience a true Christmas Bazaar atmosphere: artisans, jewelry, knitting, sewing, baking, crafts, books, silent auction, collectibles and more! Come early for your morning coffee and a muffin and stay for the best Christmas lunch in town!

“If you play your cards right, you can get your Christmas shopping done without ever needing a mall, a big box store or an online delivery.

“We are accepting $2 donations to support our community outreach projects. After all, Christmas is the season of giving!”

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Civic Chorale Singers at St. Christopher’s Anglican Church, Saturday, November 23 at 7:30 pm

eventsred 100x100By Staff

October 30th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Civic Chorale Singers will celebrate humanity’s need for love, redemption and comfort with an evening of 19th- and 20th-century works at St. Christopher’s Anglican Church, 662 Guelph Line in Burlington, on Saturday, Nov. 23 at 7:30 pm.

Sarah Q singer

Sarah Quartel

With her tenderly emotional “Snow Angel,” Canadian composer Sarah Quartel introduces a vision of angels in the form of the children among us who inspire us to be better than we’ve been. Patrick Hawes combines the ageless texts of “Beatitudes” with his stirring music to bring comfort to our present lives and hope for our future.

Fauré’s “Cantique de Jean Racine,” Eric Whitacre’s innovative setting of “Go, Lovely Rose,” and Ralph Vaughan Williams’ arrangements of British folk songs complete the program.

Tickets are $25, available at the door or in advance by calling 905-577-2425.

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Recreation services wants to know what you think of their new plans - they aren't playing around.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

October 29, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Yet another survey.

City of Burlington looking for feedback on Recreation Services Department’s priorities

This began with the creation of a “Draft Framework for Community Recreation in the City of Burlington.”

The draft framework will be the guiding document used by the Recreation Services Department (formerly the Parks and Recreation Department) in determining how tax dollars are invested in future programming, facility development and partnerships.

Splash pad LaSalle - swimming

Splash pads and pools are vital for many parents – are there enough of them?

The framework will provide clarity, transparency and consistency in how we allocate resources for recreational services. This will lead to more efficient processes such as the facility allocation including scheduling of ice, pool, gym and sport field time.

Before the framework can be finalized, the City is looking for input on where the Recreation Services Department’s priorities should be.

As for that “draft” – wasn’t included. We have asked for a copy.

The online survey can be found at getinvolvedburlington.ca/recservices and will be open until Nov. 12, 2019.

Results of this survey will be shared with Council in an upcoming report in December.

The survey is quite short – not complex.

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation Services explains: “We want to ensure we’re offering the type of programs and services that benefit the population at large. It’s good to check-in with our residents to make sure we’re focusing on the right areas of recreation. Your input is important to shape our Framework for Recreation for our City.”

Survey Link

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The evolution of baseball's unwritten rules; the game is changing.

sportsgold 100x100By John Cole

October 29th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

With MLB players expressing themselves like never before, author Jason Turbow explains how baseball can maintain its code of respect and fair play.

It’s Game 1 of the 2019 National League Divisional Series.

Acuman Braves basebakk home run

Ronald Acuña Jr: He stands and watches as it sails towards the wall, and remains in the batter’s box as it drops into the 10th row of seats. He lets out a roar and begins his slow, celebratory trot around the bases.

Ronald Acuña Jr. – playing in just the fifth playoff game of his career – launches a fly ball into left field. He stands and watches as it sails towards the wall, and remains in the batter’s box as it drops into the 10th row of seats.

He lets out a roar and begins his slow, celebratory trot around the bases.

Normal behaviour after hitting a home run, you might think, but baseball’s code has been broken.

Four games later, against the same opposition, Acuña Jr. steps up to the plate again. The Atlanta Braves need a hero. They trail 13-1 in Game 5, with their chances of reaching the next round all but extinguished.

Acuña will not, however, get a chance to be that hero. The pitch drills him on the arm. Revenge has been served.

Don’t celebrate a home run. Don’t bunt to break up a no-hitter. Don’t steal a base with a big lead late in the game. Don’t walk across the pitcher’s mound. These are just a few of baseball’s many unwritten rules.

If you break them, then expect consequences. More often than not, those consequences come in the form of a well-directed pitch, as Acuña Jr. now knows.

Such retaliation has been commonplace in the MLB for decades as players take it upon themselves to enforce their code, even when it’s their own teammate who is in the wrong.

mlb-graphic 1Jason Turbow, author of The Baseball Codes, recalls a story from 1996 involving Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Roger Cedeño.  The Venezuelan stole a base against the San Francisco Giants with an 11-2 lead late in the game, infuriating the opposition.

His team-mate, Eric Karros, headed over to the Giants’ dugout and told them: “We’ll handle this.”  When reporters were allowed into the Dodgers’ clubhouse after the victory, following the team debrief, Cedeño was wiping tears from his eyes.

Things are, however, starting to change.
Bat flips are becoming a common sight. Players are beginning to express themselves in ways the sport has never seen.

“The beautiful thing about the unwritten rules, for me, is that they are ever-evolving,” Turbow explains.

“The code that ball players abide by today is very different to how it was, even 10 years ago, which was in turn very different to a generation before that.

“People just aren’t as offended now as they used to be about these things.

“For example, it used to be you couldn’t dig in to the batter’s box – you co uldn’t shove your toe down into the dirt to get a good foothold – at the risk of offending pitchers back in the sixties and seventies. No one even notices that now.”

The move away from strict adherence to the code has been gradual, taking place over many years, and can primarily be explained by a change of mentality among modern baseball players.

Before free agency rules changed in the 1970s, movement between MLB teams was restricted, meaning many played for a single franchise for the bulk or entirety of their career.

This, Turbow explains, is why the unwritten rules were so strictly enforced.

“Up until the free agency era you were on a team, more or less, for life,” he says.
“Some players got traded, some players got released, but the only way you left a team was if they didn’t want you anymore. And thus, you built bonds with your teammates. You built antagonism with your opponents.

“In the modern era, players sometimes jump from team to team every couple of years. They go on vacations in the off-season with each other, they share agents, they do charity golf tournaments together.

“Every team is filled with players who have friends on every other team. The antagonism just isn’t there anymore.

“Whereas once you were offended by something a stranger, or an opponent who you already had antipathy toward, would do, now your opponent, who you like, is doing that same thing, you’re not even going to think about it.”

The increasing number of international MLB players – such as Acuña Jr. and Cedeño – has also contributed to this shift.

More than 25 per cent of players in the league now come from outside the USA, hailing from 20 different countries, all with their own way of playing the game.

“When it comes to integrating foreign players, there is going to be a transition process,” Turbow says.

“The brand of baseball they play in Latin America, for example, is very different.

“Celebrations are embraced down there. They are expected. This is the kind of baseball that those guys grew up learning, and now they’re bringing it to the United States.

“The Asian players, particularly the Japanese players, tend to play by even stricter rules than the Americans.
“Korean players flip the heck out of their bats. It’s all about getting used to each other.”

mlb-seo-headerRecently, however, the MLB has taken matters into its own hands. Advertising campaigns titled ‘Let The Kids Play’ and ‘We Play Loud,’ released ahead of the post-season in 2018 and 2019, explicitly condone behaviour that would previously have been condemned. Bat flips, showboating, celebrations. Anything goes.

“This officially codified the idea that these kids can show emotion on the field – they can flip their bats, they can celebrate themselves in ways that fans find appealing,” explains Turbow.

“It is baseball’s way of trying to grow the fanbase, especially among a younger demographic.”

Baseball traditionalists are, however, not making it easy for MLB. They continue to cling onto the code, passing it down to younger generations.

Right now when a pitcher throws at a batter who has only just stepped in and not yet begun his 15 step routine (touch helmet, grind foot, cock elbow five times etc) it’s called a “quick pitch.  That’s called unsportsmanlike like.

The game was designed by the best teams to move slowly.  Anything done to change that pace unsettles everything. For a game that throws so much money into tactical analysis, baseball is terrible at tactical innovation

As a result, the sport is currently going through a transition period where the old and the new coexist uneasily, particularly with regards to celebrating.

“In previous generations, bat flipping was a no-no. Pitchers would get viscerally offended, sometimes to the point of throwing a baseball at an opponent in retaliation.

“We’re now in this weird grey area in that there are still some pitchers who feel that way. Never mind that baseball has officially decreed it appropriate to flip a bat, there are still some pitchers who get annoyed at it.

“That creates some cognitive dissonance when it comes to how players behave on the field. They’re still trying to work it out.”

How, then, does baseball move forward? Can these unwritten rules, formed over a century or more, coexist with modern, fast-paced baseball?

“I think so,” asserts Turbow.

“These unwritten rules are fluid – they evolve. The idea of showing respect on the field is compatible with players having outside personalities, Twitter accounts and whatnot.

In the meantime it is a great game to wager on.

“It’s only when it comes to celebration that the hardliners and the traditionalists have a problem, and the traditionalists are dying off on a daily basis.”

So perhaps, in five years’ time, Acuña Jr. will be able to stand, admire and celebrate without fear of retribution being hurled at his ribs at 90 miles per hour.

John Cole has been watching baseball for more than four decades.  His Dad took him to his first game.  He likes the pace of the game and all those unwritten rules – but knows that changes are in the making.

 

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Pinball exhibit on at the Joseph Brant Museum.

News 100 blueBy Staff

October 28th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It is there for the whole family to enjoy.

The Joseph Brant Museum and the playable pinball exhibition is on display until January 12.

Pinball at museum

A totally different look at the world of Pinball machines – now on at the Joseph Brant Museum.

The exhibition is included in the price of Museum admission, and features rock-themed, playable pinball machines alongside merchandise and artifacts related to artists and bands.

Regular Museum Hours
Monday / Closed
Tuesday / 10:00am-4:00pm
Wednesday / 10:00am-4:00pm
Thursday / 10:00am-7:00pm
Friday / 10:00am-4:00pm
Saturday / 12:00pm-4:00pm
Sunday/ 12:00pm-4:00pm
Evenings and other times by appointment

Adults: $10.00, Seniors-students: $8.00
Children: $6.00; 3 to 12 free.
$30. Family, which is defined as up to 2 adults/seniors and up to 4 children.

Other than a little landscaping to be completed it looks as if the construction is completed. Now to see what the inside of the place looks like.

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Another survey? How many can we swallow? This time it is SoM

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

October 23rd, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We are being surveyed to death.

The city seems to have several surveys on the go at the same time. There are three they want you to respond to – soon.

These surveys aren’t all that short. Useful – but is there not a limit as to how many surveys can be put before the public?

The Sound of Music is asking for your views on what they do as a Festival and what they want to do. They need public input for the funding report they will put before council. They are too late to get anything from the public trough this year.

som-2016-band-playing

The musicians who didn’t make it to the big stages – they got some space on the streets of the city.

For those who do the SoM survey – their names will be entered into a draw for a full weekend VIP Pass to the free festival, June 18-21.

SoM survey graphic

A closer look at some of the questions and a little condition at the end of the questionnaire gives rise to some concern.

Why is a survey respondent “consenting to receive email communications from the survey author’s organization based on the information collected.

Who is the survey author’s organization?

We live in a time where personal information is both a valuable commodity and something we need to be vigilant about protecting.

In our communications with the Sound of Music and its board we have found them to be very adverse to being open and transparent with their dealings with media.  In a phrase – we don’t trust them.

So when they ask you you: “Please provide us with a small amount of personal information. Your city and state is purely for data capture. We use your contact information to enter you into the VIP Package draw. You will not be added to our mailing list, or any receive any further marketing. This is simply to contact you should you win our VIP Package draw.”

And when they add: “By entering my personal information, I consent to receive email communications from the survey author’s organization based on the information collected.” my eyebrows arch.

Set out below is a part of the survey.  You decide if you want to respond.

SoM questions some

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A delegation from Burlington takes to the streets of Itabashi, Japan and does a deep cultural dive while there.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

October 23rd, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

This story has been revised.  A reader pointed out to us that the Mayor did provide a very detailed report on her trip to France for the D Day remembrance. A link to that report is now included.

Our Mayor is in Japan.

MMW in costume - Japan

The mayor has gone rogue – taken to Japanese fashion.

She has been there since October 15th and will return on Friday.

She is part of a delegation that is celebrating our 30th anniversary of the Twinning of Burlington with Itabashi, Japan.

Attending with the Mayor and one of her daughters. The Mayor is picking up the cost of her daughter’s travel expenses.

The city manager and at least one staff member and Ward 6 Councillor Rory Nisan is part of the delegation.  Members of the Mundialization committee are also part of the delegation.

Commisso and Mayor in Japan

Mayor Meed Ward marching through the streets of Itabashi, Japan with city manager Tim Commisso doing his best to keep up.

Other than the recognition and the celebration of the twinning relationship there is no clearly stated reason for the trip.

There has been some discussion about possible business opportunities with different Japanese cities.

When the Mayor returns she has said she will tell us all about the trip.

When Mayor Meed Ward took part in the 75th Anniversary of the D Day landings in France the public was given a very detailed report that included how much was spent.  That report can be found HERE

The Mayor did report on what she spent – the sums were reasonable and acceptable. She took one of her staff members with her and they shared a room.

There is very little in the way of news from the Mayor directly – there are a number of pictures posted on one of her social media pages.

We share those with you and wish the Mayor safe travel as she prepares to return to Burlington, ranked as Canada’s best community and best place to raise a family. It is a city where people, nature and businesses thrive.

MMW on a lunch break

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward enjoying a Japanese delicacy with Councillor Nisan in the background wondering perhaps if he too will be fed.

Rory Nisan - in a kitchen

Councillor Rory Nisan taking part in what may be a cooking class.

Mmw in the kitchen

The Mayor is on the right. There was no detail provided on the pictures.

 

 

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Journalist, broadcaster and historian to talk about her book on Mary and Christopher Pratt - a couple that left a significant mark on Canadian art.

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

October 23rd, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Carol Bishop-Gwyn, is a journalist, broadcaster and historian of the arts who has written an enthralling chronicle of the eventful lives, the indelible works, and the colourful relationship of artists Mary and Christopher Pratt.

Pratt art - boat

An early screen print – Boat in Sand, 1961 is in the National Gallery’s collection.

Ross King explains the book this way: “Christopher Pratt has left a truly indelible mark on the Canadian art canvas. Bishop-Gwyn’s remarkable double portrait of Canada’s first couple of painting explores the lives of Mary and Christopher Pratt with the insight and sympathy of a friend and insider, and the wide lens and forensic scrutiny of an historian.

“Along the way we learn of the passions, tragedies and rivalries behind two extraordinary bodies of work.”

In Art and Rivalry,  Carol Bishop-Gwyn delves into the the lives of Christopher and Mary Pratt, Canada’s most renowned contemporary artists.  Their once supportive relationship ended in scandal, divorce, and a furious competition for dominance in Canadian Art. Their never-before-told story offers insight into the role of art and artists in our society.

Gwyn book on PrattThe Provincial flag of Newfoundland and Labrador, was designed by Pratt and adopted in 1980.

Nfld flagAdmission is free–please register at this link or by contacting us at (905) 639 0925 or diffdrum@mac.com.

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Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund program opens: deadline for submissions is February 24, 2020.

News 100 yellowBy Staff

October 22nd, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington has a Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund (NCMF) with up to $10,000 available for each project.

The deadline for submissions is Feb. 24, 2020.

Created to inspire residents to champion community-led projects, the goal of the NCMF is to improve neighbourhoods by creating a sense of belonging and community pride, while building meaningful connections.

Burlington residents, brought together by a common goal or neighbourhood boundaries, are encouraged to submit ideas that help make our City a better place to live and play. Inspired by the unique needs of residents and community groups, projects can increase walkability, promote beautification, encourage recreational activity, build social connections and improve safety or accessibility.

Anyone interested in applying for funds is encouraged to visit burlington.ca/matchingfund to learn more about the application process, guidelines and past projects.

Lakeshore ball park - matching grant winners

Griffen Gervais, second from the left, explains to his pals what has to be done to fix up the local ball park.

How the fund works
The NCMF provides up to $10,000 in city funding to support selected neighbourhood and community group led projects in Burlington. Approved projects receive up to 50 per cent of the funding for the project from the City. The neighbourhood or community group will match this funding with an equal contribution made up through any combination of volunteer hours, donated services, donated materials and supplies or other funds raised, such as cash donations.

Some very good projects have been funded using the NCMF program. There is a ball diamond that was in really rough shape next to Lakeshore Public school. Griffen Gervais and a bunch of his friends (with a lot of help from their parents) approached the city and got the funding they wanted.

Backstop Lakesh PS

It was a pretty rough looking ball diamond – Griffen Gervais and his buddies did the work needed to get city funding.

The program does work; the amount available has been increased and staff within Parks and Recreation come close to bending over backwards to make what people want to do possible.

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Interactive Art Installation - Invites visitors to engage with a 10ft long, handmade waste receptacle.

artsorange 100x100By Pepper Parr

October 20th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

From October 22-25 from 1-5 pm each day, The Hobbyist will be performing on site maintenance, collecting and documenting trash in the area, and conducting a short survey with participants.

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification. The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects, the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process, made what appears now available and we share it with you.
With information that is clear we can now share with you what the city made possible.

These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations

These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

There are two installation in Spencer Smith Park.  Arianna Richardson (AKA The Hobbyist), holds a Garbage Party that is a Mixed Media Sculpture + Performance

Art image spencer smith 2

Now that is a garbage can!

Garbage Party is an interactive project that invites visitors to engage with a 10ft long, handmade waste receptacle as its physical form would suggest: as a fully functioning garbage bin with a wide variety of collection categories.

This installation prompts the public to consider their own relationships with waste and recycling, presenting a playful and absurd site in which to engage in conversations about our consumer society and the impact of the waste it generates.

From October 22-25 from 1-5pm each day, The Hobbyist will be performing on site maintenance, collecting and documenting trash in the area, and conducting a short survey with participants.

Arianna Richardson is a sculptor, performance artist, and mother from Treaty Seven territory (Lethbridge, AB).  Richardson most often works under the pseudonym, The Hobbyist, employing hobby-craft techniques to work through an investigation of ubiquitous consumption, gendered labour, waste, excess, and spectacle.

More at: ariannarichardson.ca

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The Great Dark Wonder at Burloak Waterfront Park

artsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

October 18th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification.

The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects,  the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process made what appears now available and we share it with you.

With information that is clear we can now share with you what the city made possible.
These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations.

These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

The installation at Burloak Waterfront Park has Tyler Muzzin using a cell phone for his installation: The Great Dark Wonder which is a cross using Sculpture + Audio Play

Art Burloak image

The Great Dark Wonder – a cross between Sculpture + Audio Play

Using cellphones, visitors to Burloak Waterfront Park can listen in on a dialogue between two fictional ornithologists who are eternally confined to the research station by unknown forces.

Muzzin’s installation explores ideas of the “Natural” through the lens of ecocriticism. The installation focuses on the representation of physical environments and the ways in which these environments are depicted and, in turn, consumed by mass culture.

Tyler Muzzin holds an MFA from the University of Lethbridge (2019). Recent exhibitions include Flower Arrangements for the Hillcrest Mine Disaster Cemetery, a solo project at the Iceland Academy of Arts (2019), and Of Surroundings, a group exhibition at the Southern Alberta Art Gallery in Lethbridge, Alberta (2019). A folio of photographs from the series Sentinel was selected for publication in Spring 2019 by 89books, Palermo, Italy.

More at: tylermuzzin.net

 

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A piece of visual art depicts the different sounds from activities at the Tansley Woods Community Centre.

theartsBy Pepper Parr

October 18th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification.

The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects, the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process, made what appears now available.  With that information we can now share with you what the city made possible.

These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations.

These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

Kristina Bradt has done Intersection which is a Soundscape Projection  installed in the lobby of the Tansley Woods Community Centre.

Bradt visited the facility at different times throughout the season to collect sound using a field recorder. By capturing the sounds of the activities, events, and people that move through the space, Bradt captured that which often goes unnoticed.

Art image Tansley Woods

The different sounds from activities at the Tansley Woods Community Centre got transformed into art.

Bradt then uses these recordings to create a large-scale floor projection that features bright, abstracted imagery that has a contemporary feel and brings a sense of wonder and curiosity directly inspired by the energy and livelihood of those who inhabit the space. What you see is the artist’s interpretation of the sound data, turned visual art.

Kristina Bradt is an artist and public art enthusiast living in Windsor, Ontario. Bradt earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from University of Windsor (2017) with a focus in Sculpture, Drawing and Digital Media.

Her interest in 3D printing inspired her research into art that depicts the visualization of sound over the past 2 1/2 years and led her work at Artscape Gibraltar Point for her first residency this past February (2019).

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If you make a bundle gambling on line - do you have to pay taxes on what you win?

News 100 blueClaire Nash

October 17, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Gambling - accounting papers

No need to do any tax accounting for your on-line wins

We won’t be exaggerating if we state that taxes are every Canadian’s worst nightmare! And when it comes to online gambling, an immediate question asked by every player is – are they required to pay taxes on their winnings at such platforms?

Well, the good news is that you don’t need to pay any taxes on such winnings if you are only a recreational player and a Canadian resident.

So, I could sign up to www.casino.com to play the desert treasure slot, win a huge sum and get to take the entire win home, without paying anything to the exchequer.


Why casino players aren’t required to pay any taxes.
Canadian government can’t tax any gambling activity because it doesn’t serve as a regular source of income, and doesn’t originate from property, employment or any other regular earning means. Gambling also isn’t considered a type of business and majority of Canadians don’t live off their gambling winnings. In the eyes of the law, taxing such events will not be fair. Here’s more on the peculiarities of gambling in Canada.

Are Canadians required to pay any taxes on gambling winnings?
No, there is no need for Canadians to pay any taxes on winnings from gambling activities like lotteries, sports betting, horse racing, online casinos etc. however, you must declare any interest earned on these winnings in the T5 form. Any such interest is taxable in nature and you could be fined if you are caught not paying taxes on it.

Are professional Canadian gamblers required to pay taxes?
Anyone who gambles full-time, whether off-line or online, and makes a living from the activity, must pay taxes on their winnings. Hence, professional blackjack players, poker players or anyone who calls themselves a professional gambler, will be perceived as a running a freelance business, the income from which is taxable in Canada.

However, there’s a catch. The Canada Revenue Agency has been very slow in assessing and auditing people whose primary source of income is gambling. Why this is so is because these people are essentially operating the business and the profits earned from the business are taxable.

Gambling tax calculator

No calculations to be done.

But the same business can lead to major losses, reducing overall income. If the Canadian revenue agency starts taxing these professional players in a forceful manner, it could have a very bad domino effect throughout Canada.

This doesn’t mean that if you are a professional gambler, you should avoid paying any taxes. It’s only information that you should be aware of.

Furthermore, a court ruling in 2012 stated that gambling losses aren’t tax write-offs.

Gambling wins in Vegas or US as a Canadian citizen
Anyone who visits Las Vegas or United States to gamble and comes back with the winnings, must pay close to half of their winnings exceeding US$ 1200 as taxes to the government. If you thought you could just avoid declaring any such income, well, think again! When you walk up to cash out your winnings at the booth, 30% is deducted as tax at source there and then!

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What’s Happening at Burlington Area Casinos This Fall/Winter

eventsred 100x100By Jenny Atkins

October 17th, 2019

BURLINGTON,, ON

 

Although the year is coming to a close, there are still loads of great events to enjoy at casinos in and around the Burlington area. We’ve scoured the best live gambling venues surrounding the city and compiled a list of the very best events taking place. See out 2019 in style with one of the suggestions below!

Not all the casinos in the area have spaces for events but those that do have some seriously great entertainment lined up. There are also a plethora of poker tournaments and special cash games dotted around.

In case you don’t have enough time to visit a casino in Burlington you can always sign up for one of the many Canadian no deposit options. Be wary though and rather start with a no deposit bonus to test the waters first.

Elements Casino Brantford
Elements BradfordWhen you’re not propping up a slot machine or indulging in either limit or no limit action at one of the 14 live cash game tables, why not venture into one of the great shows the casino hosts regularly.

Below, you’ll find the full line-up of events for the rest of the year.

 

 

Ryapsody Rebels (October 25)
“Hooligans with music in their blood”, the London, Ontario-based three-piece will bring their stripped back indie jams to the casino this October.

MixMaker (October 26)
DJ MixMaker will bring the party on Saturday October 26.

Falls View Casino Resort

Falls View

Eric Suen & Vivian Lai (October 20 – October 21)
An evening of classic Cantonese and Mandarin hits with Hong Kong’s acclaimed duo.

The Midtown Men (Stars from the Original Broadway Cast of Jersey Boys) (October 23 – October 27)
After gelling onset in the hit musical, Christian Hoff, Michael Longoria, Daniel Reichard, and Robert Spencer decided to take their ‘60s show on the road. Check them out this October at the casino.

Rick Springfield

Rick Springfield

Rick Springfield (November 1 – November 2)
The multi-decade-spanning Rick Springfield will perform hits from his extensive back catalogue to kick off the November events program. Appearing over two nights, you’ve no excuse not to get over for this intimate performance.

Keeps on trucking
Eric Moo (November 3 – November 4)
Award-winning Malaysian singer-songwriter Eric Moo will be at the casino performing hits in both Cantonese and Mandarin.

The Jim Cuddy Band (November 6)
The multi-gold-record-selling Jim Cuddly Band will appear before a local crowd to perform hits from his five solo albums. Being a local boy, we’re expecting this one to be popular.

Collective Soul (November 7 – November 8)
American alt-rockers Collective Soul will hit the casino with their blend of post-grunge and soft rock jams. Even after more than 25 years in the game, this five-piece are still more than capable of rocking a crowd. Come see for yourself this November.

Brandi Carlile (November 9 – November 10)
The genre-spanning Brandi Carlile will be putting on an intimate solo performance.

Air supply

Air Supply

Air Supply (November 14 – November 16)
Starting their musical journey in the mid-1970s, transatlantic soft rockers Air Supply have a raft of hits to date. You can catch them performing a huge selection from their multi-decade career this Fall at the casino.
Firm favourite
Christmas On Ice (November 21 – December 8)
Kicking off Christmas in style. This high-octane figure-skating spectacular is bound to get you in the festive spirit!

An Evening with Old Dominion, The Band Behind the Curtain (December 12 – December 13)
Hot off the back of the release of their latest self-titled album, this Nashville-based five-piece are keen to perform their latest material. For all you older fans, we’re sure the country/rock/hip-hop mashup will throw in a few classics to boot!

Casino Niagara
Casino NiagaraThe Casino Niagara’s EV2L Sports Bar & Entertainment area host live weekend entertainment each week. There is also a truly scintillating menu in the joint, loaded with classic bar snacks. It’s the perfect place to take in a live performance, watch the game, or hit the dance floor after hitting the casino’s tables.

Triple Crowns (October 25 – October 26)
There’s no cover charge for this night of rock and pop hosted by Triple Crowns!

Stone the Radio (November 1 – November 2)
Kick off November with Stone the Radio, one of Ontario’s finest alternative and classic rock covers bands. Dig out your leathers and we’ll see you at the front!

DJ Recon (November 8)
Get ready to boogie with the multi-genre disc jockeying of DJ Recon.

Renegade (November 9)
Featuring an eclectic roster of tunes ranging from AC/DC to Bruno Mars, there’s something for everyone at a Renegade show! Come and see for yourself.

By Design (November 15 – November 16)
This local quartet will be performing rock classics from throughout the ages.

DJ Vibe (November 22 – November 23)
Local master of the turntables, DJ Vibe, is sure to start the party at Casino Niagara this November. Will you be there?

DJ 5150 (November 29)
Another night another DJ! This time it’s DJ 5150 spinning the tunes for the party people of the Casino Niagara.

Razorbax (November 30)
Local classic rockers The Razorbax will perform their countryfied jams for your listening pleasure.

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Installation art: Sports, the Gym and Library were used along with materials found in the natural park surroundings of the community centre to tell part of the story.

artsorange 100x100By Pepper Parr

October 16th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

 

The Brant Hills Community Centre got a Jimmy Limit photo treatment to help tell part of the communities story.

Photos from Brant Hills Community Centre is a series of large-scale photographic murals inspired by the functions and surroundings of the Brant Hills Community Centre.

Art Brant Hills imageMaterials associated with sports, the gym and library have been combined with materials found in the natural park surroundings of the community centre. By using the language built around commercial photography and advertising, Limit’s images document unlikely assemblages, which cause the viewer to question the motives of the imagery when placed in the public realm.

Jimmy Limit is a photo-based artist living in St. Catharines. Limit has exhibited throughout Canada and the United States including Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn Estonia, Rodman Hall St. Catharines, Clint Roenisch Gallery, Toronto and Printer Matter, NYC. Recent public works have included Photos for a Project in Progress at the Bentway in Toronto and Photos for Vacant Storefronts, for CAFKA16 in Kitchener, ON.

More at: jimmylimit.com

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification. The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects, the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process made what appears now available and we share it with you.

With information that is clear we can now share with you what the city made possible.

These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations

These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

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Are we a little thick between the ears: the instructions for this installation art experience just didn't sink in.

theartsBy Pepper Parr

October 15th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification.

The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects, the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process, made what appears now available and we share it with you.

With information that is clear we can now share with you what the city made possible.

These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations.

These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

Troy Lovegates, Hide and Seek at Spencer Smith Park has a communication challenge of its own.

Art Spencer Smith image

We were Ok up to this point. Where is the stamp we are supposed to put into the map we picked up at the Gazebo. Confusion reigned – it was good idea though.

It is a Wood Sculptures, Scavenger Hunt Map

Hide and Seek is a series of folk art wood sculptures that have been hidden throughout Spencer Smith Park.

So far – so good.

Park visitors are invited to participate in a “scavenger hunt” to find the sculptures and collect a stamp at each location.

Who hands out the stamp ? Are they just sitting there for the taking?  What happens when it is raining?

Visitors can pick up a map with clues from the birdhouse box located beside the gazebo and start their adventure.

The first people to turn in their completed map to the Burlington Visitor Centre (414 Locust Street, 9:00 am 0 4:00 pm) will receive a special prize!

Is this the first person every day?

Sounds like a great idea – but the instructions aren’t clear enough.  If this part of this art event worked for you – do let us know.  We might be the ones that are a little thick.

Troy Lovegates is an internationally prolific street artist who begins his process by immersing himself within the project’s immediate area, breathing in its surroundings and passersby. His public art centres on the holistic importance of community, frequently featuring images of residents taken on early expeditions around a project site. Lovegates has spent many years exploring the nooks and crannies of Lake Ontario, its nearby railway corridors and green spaces.

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'I wish I could explain': installation art at Norton Community Park

artsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

October 14th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The city invests a considerable amount of money in public art and throughout each year contests are held that allow artists to pitch their ideas for what is referred to as “installation” art; something that is not permanent and is often work that can be interacted with.

The city announced seven installation art locations that were to be launched along with Culture Days which took place late in September.

A communications glitch got in the way of our publishing and promoting these events. The Senior Manager Strategic Communications prevented us from talking to the Manager of Cultural Services for some clarification.

The answers the Senior Manager Strategic Communications gave us were not clear and we didn’t have the time to do the back and forth that was required to get clear answers.

Cobalt Connects, the Hamilton based organization that manages the selection of artist’s process made what appears now available and we share it with you.

With information that is clear we can now share with you what the city made possible.

These installations were available on September 27 and will be on display until October 27, 2019. There are seven Temporary Art Installations.  These artists transformed spaces across Burlington with temporary public art installations. By placing art in unexpected spaces such as parks and community centres, the Public Art Lab brings contemporary art to new audiences. All installations are free of charge! The Public Art Lab is produced by the City of Burlington’s public art program.

The art is pretty well distributed throughout the city – except for Aldershot – they got stiffed.

Art Norton image

The wish might get you thinking – which is the point of it all.

The installation at the Norton Community Park is called Typographic Fencing; something that  defines space and prompts conversation by creating large-scale text in areas where it is not expected— around the edges of parking lots, near ravines, off divided highways, around a fenced-in playground.

These temporary installations are woven out of flagging-tape, a simple, inexpensive material used to mark boundaries. Squares in chain-link or vertical-bar fences become pixels on a screen or canvas, the medium for messages. The messages are installed anonymously and removed without ceremony. By transforming large-text into large questions, aim to spark a dialogue.

Lambchop is a street artist and designer based in the American South, specializing in permanent and ephemeral public installations investigating the relationship between place, typography, and interaction. Lambchop’s work has been exhibited internationally and recognized with a Communication Arts Award, a Society of Typographic Arts “STA 100” Award, has been featured through DesignMilk, NotCot and SHFT.

More on this artist at: cargocollective.com/lambchop

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Charo: Hot Flamenco Night - Instantly recognizable!

eventspink 100x100By Staff

October 8th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Charo at BPAC

Charo: Instantly recognizable for her witty humour, lovable accent and mastery of the flamenco guitar.

The Burlington Performing Arts Centre presenting: Charo: Hot Flamenco Night on Saturday, October 12 in the Main Theatre, the only Canadian date for this legendary performer.

Instantly recognizable for her witty humour, loveable accent and mastery of the flamenco guitar, Charo has been an integral proponent of contemporary Latin music since the 1970s.
is also smoking hot!

Although popular as a musician, singer, comedienne, stage and screen performer, it is Charo’s trademark quirky comedy and expressions – Cuchi-Cuchi! – which has endeared her to the world.

Charo: Hot Flamenco Night will feature a mixture of her patented rhythms and mastery of classical guitar. It is a combination of the most exciting and original music of today and the most famous classical masterpieces in the world. Charo performs passionately throughout, blending heart and soul with her unique Flamenco style.

Charo is an American music and pop culture icon who has entertained millions throughout her career. She also teams up with top-name DJs and producers from around the world, who add their dance mixes to Charo’s virtuoso guitar performance to creates dance hits.

Charo: Hot Flamenco Night
Saturday, October 12 at 8pm
440 Locust Street, Burlington, Ontario
Tickets can be purchased by telephone, online or in person:
905-681-6000, https://burlingtonpac.ca/events/charo/
Tickets: $69.50
Sponsored by Andrew Peller Ltd.

 

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Those that toured the quarry - 150 people - appeared to like what they saw and heard.

News 100 blueBy Staff

October 7th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

More than 150 visitors came from across Halton Region to attend Nelson Aggregates’ Quarry Open House and Bus Tour.

Nelson President Quinn Moyer said: “We were pleasantly surprised. Attendees showed a lot of interest and support for our operations, our expansion plans and our vision for turning the site into a park over 30 years.”

16 Rendering of bowl Golf club or main quarry

The golf club property that is on the western side of the properties would be turned into a very large park.

The Open House featured bus tours of the quarry and interactive exhibits, including quarry machinery such as crushers, loaders, bulldozers and excavators.

“It’s great to see residents interested in the types of operations that form the foundation of our daily lives,” Moyer said. “It’s easy to forget that the building blocks of where we live come from quarries like ours.”

The Mt. Nemo quarry has played an important role as Burlington’s main source of limestone for more than 50 years. Its aggregate forms the foundation of most roads, buildings and infrastructure in Burlington.

3 holdings

One quarry that is close to be mined out; two new quarries that would be open and then everything would be turned over to the public.

A proposal is underway to expand the quarry over the next 30 years, and to donate the rehabilitated land in parcels over that time to form the largest park in Burlington.

The proposed park would be nearly six times larger than Burlington’s City View Park. The size and scale of the park would allow for abundant recreational opportunities, from biking and swimming to rock climbing and soccer.

14a rendering of the lake 77acres

A lake – 77 acres in size will be formed out of a mined out quarry.

The Gazette asked a reader to take the tour and come back to us with his views. He didn’t take out his wallet to buy into it – but did say that he wanted to hear more. “Was this a gift horse whose mouth we should be looking into” he asked “or is it a Trojan horse that we would regret letting in.”

The Nelson Aggregate people have yet to have a conversation with the ward Councillor, Rory Nisan, who has said he doesn’t want anyone to shape his opinion of the project, has shown no interest in hearing what the aggregate producer has in mind.

So far, the only Councillor who has been to the site is Angelo Bentivegna who was with our reader.

Our reader has said he is of two minds. The one thing he is certain about is that the city should be talking to the Nelson people and learning more about what they have in mind.

The Planning department, who have more on their plates than they can handle now, are certainly not out there looking for things to do.

Our reader said he was really impressed with the potential but did wonder if Burlington needed another park.
What our reader did find interesting was that no one he talked to came out and said they did not want a park in that part of Burlington.

With the public tour behind them Nelson now has to craft the application it has to take to the city and at the same time think through the various levels of government they are going to have to satisfy and how best they can do that.

The next step is to have a pre-consultation meeting with the Planning department – expected to be sometime in November.

The big picture question is: Is another park needed? Not today perhaps but in 30 years the need for public space will be a lot different than it is today.

To find out more CLICK HERE

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