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Mountainside is going to get some public art to brighten up the pool. The facility has undergone significant upgrades - a long time dream of former Councillor John Taylor

By Staff

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Community members needed to join the Mountainside Pool Revitalization Public Art Steering Committee

The city’s public art program is looking for community members to join the Steering Committee for the Mountainside Pool Revitalization Project public art mural.

Rendering of what the pool and the shade area would look like

The Steering Committee will provide input into project goals and themes, create a shortlist from the applicants and the winning artist.

The public art program is commissioning a professional artist to paint a mural as part of this project. This revitalization will create a new attractive, fun and welcoming multi-use outdoor swimming pool. The goal is to revitalize the Mountainside Pool so it is inviting and encourages participation through swimming and water play while fostering an active and healthy lifestyle.

Three artists will be shortlisted to create preliminary design concepts for the public review and comment. The community Steering Committee will evaluate the public feedback plus the technical proposal to select the winning artist.

The pool is heavily used.

Steering Committee Roles & Responsibilities
• Attend a project start-up meeting (online) to brainstorm project goals and themes
• Review and score artist proposals to select a shortlist of three artists
• Review design proposals and public feedback of three short-listed artists to select winning artist
• All scoring can be done remotely using an online submission system. Jury meetings will be held via videoconference

Honorarium
Steering Committee members will be given an honorarium of $200 as a token of appreciation for their time commitment and participation in the project.

Time Commitment
• Three meetings via videoconference
o Project Start-up: one hour
o Select Shortlist: two hours
o Select Winning Proposal: two hours
• Review and score artist submissions: this task can be done remotely using an online review system (approximately five hours)

Project Timeline
Deadline Activity

May/June 2022 Meeting #1: project start-up meeting (videoconference)
September 2022 Review and score artist proposals (online)
October 2022 Meeting #2: Select shortlist (videoconference)
January 2023 Public consultation
February 2023 Review and score shortlisted design proposals and public feedback (online)
March 2023 Meeting #3: Select winning artist (videoconference)
May/June 2023 Artwork installation and unveiling

Some art work would certainly help this entrance

How to Apply

Interested applicants should send:

1. Their name
2. Contact Information
1. address
2. phone
3. email
3. And a brief statement outlining why they are interested in joining the Steering Committee (250 words maximum)

Applications should be submitted to Kim Selman at kim@cobaltconnects.ca or at burlingtonpublicart.com/get-involved/jury-roster/ before Friday, May 6.

For more information, please visit www.burlington.ca/publicart.

Councillor Sharman speaking to Angela Paparazzo

Angela Paparizo, Manager of Arts and Culture explains what this initiative is all about.

“Not only is this a great opportunity for an artist to design and create a beautiful mural for the revitalized Mountainside Pool, it is also an exciting opportunity for residents to join the steering committee to help us select the right artist for this project. I welcome anyone who is thinking about applying to contact us with any questions.

Residents are encouraged to submit their applications before May 6. It is my hope that Burlington residents will get involved in this opportunity to choose an artist and evaluate the mural submissions for Mountainside.”

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It is much more than a model railroad in the basement of the Freeman Station. It is a significant look at the early years of the city.

By Denis Gibbons

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Folks in the Bay Area remember Bob Chambers as a superb photographer with The Hamilton Spectator, who covered world events like the wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana in 1981.

Few, though, know of another of his many talents – creating miniature displays, sometimes known as dioramas.

A steam locomotive pulls up in front of the miniature Burlington Junction station. Photo by DENIS GIBBONS

A huge replica of the hamlet of Freeman in the 1920s, and specifically the old Burlington Junction railway station, now occupies the basement of the historical Freeman Station on Fairview Street.

Freeman was located at about the intersection of Brant Street and Old Plains Road.

Retired Teachers of Ontario members presented the Friends of Freeman Station with a grant of $4000. Left to Right: Ron Danielsen, FOFS President; Ruth Miller, RTO Project Sponsor; Penny Hambly, RTO Awards Committee; Carolyn Hilton, RTO Awards Committee; and Claudia Stewart, RTO-District 15 President.

Retired Teachers of Ontario (RTO) provided $4000  to fund a computer control system for its historic model railway educational exhibit. The money was used to purchase the central “brains” of the museum-quality model railway diorama depicting life in the village of Freeman.

Chambers constructed the model in the basement of his home. Gates Bisson contributed other items like a replica of the old fruit-processing plant and Supertest gas station and historian Bob Miller created a cattle pen.

Gary Thompson also donated a circus train, which will be used when children start arriving on field trips. The train often passed through Burlington many years ago on its way to set up in Hamilton.

Miller and KenTaylor, members of the Friends of Freeman Station, operate the model railway setup, which covers 660 square feet.

Miller recalls that before the layout was set up in the basement, the group set up a smaller model railway display at the library and included a Thomas the Train engine, from the popular TV show for children.

“Thomas’ headlights showed up as little eyes,” Miller said. “The kids just loved that.”

Two miniature locomotives approach the junction carefully. Photo by DENIS GIBBONS

The focus is the illuminated Burlington Junction station, which until 1988 stood on the railway line just to the southwest of the intersection of Brant Street and Old Plains Road.

Near the station is the actual junction of two lines – one which ran all the way from Montreal through Toronto and Burlington, then split at Hamilton allowing passengers to travel as far as either Chicago or New York.

Visitors took lots of photos of the miniature layout. Photo by DENIS GIBBONS

The other line, which started at the village of Allandale near Barrie, ran south to Burlington, then down the Beach Strip to service cooling units for frozen fruit grown in the area.

Because it eventually re-connected with the main line at Stoney Creek, it also was a quick bypass of the clogged lines in Hamilton.

The display includes a video describing how a steam locomotive works.

Burlington was once known as the fruit basket of Canada.

Dried fruit, particularly melons grown in farms along Plains Road, were shipped from the station around the world. Later canneries opened in this area.

A child in period costume was part of the crown on the re-opening of Freeman Station. Photo by Denis Gibbons

Queen Elizabeth and Canadian Prime Ministers from Sr. John A. MacDonald to Lester B. Pearson travelled along the main line, as did NHL teams moving from Montreal and Toronto to Detroit, Chicago and New York.

More than 1.000 service men left the station to defend their country in times of war and peace. Marching bands and hundreds of their fellow citizens walked with them to the station to bid them farewell.

After the Second World War, many emigrants from Europe arrived at this station to make a new life in Burlington.

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Ukraine needs our help now; take part in a fund raising event on May 14th.

By Staff

May 3rd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

One Burlington, the group that celebrates faith, culture and embraces diversity. is hosting a fund raising concert for Ukraine

The event will take place at St. Christopher’s Anglican Church on Saturday, May 14, 2022 – 2:00 pm

The funds raised will go to the Canada Ukraine Foundation.

Members of the Ukrainian community filled Civic Square awhile ago – things in their country have not gotten any better. Continued support is badly needed.

A suggested donation of $20 per person would be appreciated. For those who might want to donate in advance the CU Foundation website  A tax-receipt will be issued.

Several professional artists are donating their talents for this important cause.

Charles Cozens  has more than 150 CD’s in circulation.

Jeff Madden, tenor, will be performing uplifting material from the American musical theatre songbook. Mr. Madden starred as Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys and Kevin in the ensemble cast of Come From Away.

Charles Cozens and Colin Maier are the duo, JoyRide.

Cozens is a renown accordionist, Maier plays numerous instruments in this dynamic duo.

Andrea Battista is a violinist with the Burlington Symphony Orchestra and Chair of the Burlington Arts and Culture Council of Burlington. She will accompany Jeff Madden and entertain us with a solo performance on the piano.

There are several performances by local groups as well

GuZheng Group presents young people on the Chinese Zither, a harpsichord-like instrument. Dressed in traditional costumes, this ensemble is amazing to watch.

Several Ukrainian churches have pulled together a choir to perform. .

A Bandura duo will perform on this traditional Ukrainian lute-like instrument. The closing act will be a presentation by the young company of the Tyrsa Ukrainian Dancers.

Tyrsa Ukrainian Dancers.

Fabulously dressed in embroidered shirts, bright red skirts and pants and ribboned caps, these young people will raise spirits and smiles as well as funds!

One Burlington is organizing this event in co-operation with the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Holy Protection of the Mother of God.

One Burlington has been presenting events since 2017. It is dedicated to bringing people together to learn more about each other to create understanding and acceptance.  Their website is at  oneburlington.net

There is a desperate situation in Ukraine – they need our help now – be as generous as you can.

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Nominations for city council opened today 7 have signed up.

By Pepper Parr

May 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON.

 

Beginning to get interesting.

The following trotted along to the office of the City Clerk and put the passport on the table and handed over the filing fee.

 

Tony Brecknock, centre: video expert

Some interesting new names.  Tony Brecknock hasn’t seen the inside of the Council Chamber in a decade.  He was a major player in the school closing issue and he ran a candidate as a school board trustee.

Robert Radway

Robert Radway, a high school teacher (20 years in) teaches history.  Wasn’t sure he would resign as a teacher – he wants to clear up that issue very quickly.

Councillor Paul Sharman: Thinking it over very carefully

The other are current members of Council.  Sharman has his nomination papers ready for filing.  He was soliciting people at the Chamber of Commerce event recently.  Expect Paul to be very cautious – there is a brass ring for the taking if he is careful.

Needs to build a credible organization to pull this one off.  He should be looking for a cracker jack campaign manager that he will listen to.

Stick around – this crowd is not going to wait for the election of a new Premier get in the way of raising funds and building a team.

A report that has some credibility was the ward that even if she is acclaimed – Mayor Meed Ward will still run a campaign.  Has she not learned that Ann Marsden is planning on running.  Expect her name to appear on the list soon.

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Battle of the Atlantic Sunday

Was it the weather?

Was it because May 1 is traditionally a day for the working people – a time when the men and woman who do the hard work that leaves muscles sore and backs aching.

May 1st turned out to be the first Sunday in May; a time when Canada celebrate and remember those lost in the Battle of the Atlantic

Canadians commemorated the 77th anniversary of the end of action in the Battle of the Atlantic and the sacrifices of the thousands of Canadians who fought valiantly from 1939-1945 during the longest campaign of the Second World War.

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest Second World War campaign.  Vice-Admiral Craig Baines, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, put it all too well when he described it as “cold, wet, dangerous. Fought with courage, dedication and honour. Our world today – who they were then, and who we are now is forever connected by their sacrifice.”

These were the ships that fought the Battle of the Atlantic, the longest naval battle in history. Shown here is HMCS Haida, currently tied up in Hamilton.

The Battle of the Atlantic began on September 3, 1939, with the sinking of the SS Athenia by German submarine U-30. Allied forces fought for control of the North Atlantic Ocean to supply the war effort from 1939 to 1945, making this the longest campaign of the Second World War

The RCN grew from a mere 6 destroyers and 3,500 personnel in 1939, to 373 fighting ships and more than 100,000 sailors by War’s end – one of the largest navies in the world.

Our sailors and airmen sank or shared in the destruction of some 50 U-boats while they escorted some 25 thousand merchant ships during the war to deliver more than 165 million tonnes of life & war-sustaining cargo to Europe in a merchant navy that became the world’s fourth largest.

Rick Wilson isn’t certain as to exactly where the battle for control of Lake Ontario took place but believes it was just offshore from the Naval monument.

These accomplishments were fueled by an impressive shipbuilding effort that saw more than 400 merchant ships built in Canadian shipyards that also churned-out 281 destroyers/corvettes & frigates, 206 minesweepers, over 250 tugs and over 3,000 landing craft.

In 1943, Rear-Admiral Leonard Murray was put in charge of the Allied Air and Naval forces in the Northwest Atlantic; the only Canadian to command an Allied theatre of conflict in either World War.

Throughout the Battle of the Atlantic, 24 Canadian of the 175 Allied warships were lost. 2,600 merchant ships including 62 Canadian vessels also met the same fate.

The human cost: more than 2,700 RCN/RCAF and 1,600 Canadian Merchant Navy personnel died.

Just weeks before the end of hostilities, HMCS Esquimalt was sunk and 44 died in the Halifax approaches, in April 1945.

Fought largely by reservists in small ships built in Canada and operating from Canadian bases, the defence of North Atlantic trade against the submarine menace defined a naval role for Canada within a much larger alliance. After 1945, the RCN became one of the best anti-submarine warfare navies in the world.

lmost 7,000 women served their country in a wide variety of crucial roles during the War.

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Freeman Station, closed during the pandemic has re-opened - lots of painting and upgrading done to the station

By DENIS GIBBONS

May 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Freeman Station, Burlington’s historical gem, was celebrated Saturday at a Grand Reopening following a lengthy restoration by volunteers with the help of an Ontario Trillium Foundation grant, resulting in a sparkling new edifice.

New panels were installed, as well as new flooring, painting was done, the ceiling restored and the original windows, including the distinctive Jane Irwin oval window at the end of the room, reconstructed.

Ed Keenleyside, president of the Friends of Freeman Station,

Ed Keenleyside, president of the Friends of Freeman Station, said the Grand Trunk Railway Station is 100 per cent operated by volunteers. He outlined a three-way, five-year legal agreement which has made the project possible.

“Solenis Chemicals (an adjacent plant) has been very good to allow us to use this land,” he said. “The building is owned by the City and all artifacts by the Friends of Freeman Station.”

The wooden station, named after Freeman village founder Joshua Freeman, was originally located on the CN rail line near the corner of Brant Street and Plains Road. In 2005, it was moved, in order to save it from demolition, when a third track was installed.

Lifted off the blocks it had perched on for a couple of years the station got hoisted by a crane and lowered into it new home that had a full basement.

It’s the only building in the city whose historical and architectural significance has been recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Culture and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

This station was built in 1906 to replace a previous one destroyed by fire.

While it looked like a taxi – it was a full time inspection vehicle that could use railway tracks to inspect the condition of the rail bed,

Motorists driving by might have noticed a bright yellow old-time car in the front of the station. It’s a Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo rail inspection car. Currently, it’s in a shed but will be brought out again as soon as necessary adjustments are made.

Roger Ryan, whose wife is the niece of Stan Roskovich, the last person to work as station agent before it closed in 1988, showed up with a bag of memorabilia.

VIA Rail and GO Transit trains still were using the station up until then.

R. Paul Johnson, 88, plays the role of station agent. Photo by DENIS GIBBONS

Eighty-eight-year-old R. Paul Johnson, whose grandfather Alfred Johnson once operated the swing bridge for the railway over the Burlington Canal, posed as station agent for the day.

There are 12 tour stops at the Freeman Station. Among them are the station master’s office, baggage room, waiting room, a giant caboose and boxcar and a memorial to Burlington’s fallen military heroes who left from the station to defend their country in war. Some never returned and are buried in European cemeteries.

The waiting room will be available as meeting space for use by small groups.

Sitting on some “cribbing” with a sign badly in need of several coats of paint, the Freeman Station gets ready for its big move.

Before the location beside Burlington Fire Department headquarters on Fairview Street, between Brant and Maple Avenue, was settled on, Burlingtonians listed Beachway Park directly across from the Joseph Brant Museum as their first choice.

It has a significant historical context because the Hamilton Radial Railway and Hamilton & Northern Railway used to run right past it parallel to Burlington Beach.

Passengers from Toronto used to disembark at a nearby station for dinner and dancing at the old Brant Inn.

The Freeman station got moved around a number of times while the city figured out what it wanted to do with the thing. When city council failed to come up with a solution citizens did.

Central Park and Maple Park also were considered and Aldershot resident Bill Fasullo recommended Hidden Valley Park where it could be rented by the local model railroad club and second to move it close to the Aldershot GO train station, which is on the same rail line it used to service.

The Burlington Sports Hall of Fame had earlier indicated an interest in using the building. The City of Toronto also had asked about using the old station as a gift shop at its Toronto Rail Heritage Centre.

Future open house dates include May 21, June 11, July 1 (Canada Day), August 8, September 10 and October 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

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Ward 1 now has a new candidate for the council seat

By Pepper Parr

May 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Robert Radway, an Aldershot resident who has been a teacher at Burlington Central has announced that he will be a candidate for the ward 1 city council seat.

He and his wife have raised three children ages 12, 14 and 17. All three boys attend Aldershot High School.

His priorities if elected are:

1. Community Engagement
2. Environment
3. Development

The Radway nomination comes at an awkward time for incumbent Kelven Galbraith who is getting significant blow-back on his decision to file a complaint with the Integrity Commissioner who recommended a five day pay docking for a fellow council member.

In the 2018 election there were 11 candidates in the race,

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HDSB to focus on one of the five focus areas each day that make up the 2020-2024 Multi-Year Plan to show the importance of schools, staff, families and the community working together

By Staff

May 2, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

HDSB to focus on one of the five focus areas each day that make up the 2020-2024 Multi-Year Plan to show the importance of schools, staff, families and the community working together

Everyone has an opinion on education and everyone pays taxes to support the system we have in Ontario.

There is a lot to be learned about how our children are educated.  The week of May 2nd is your opportunity to learn how the Halton District School Board does that educating.

The Halton District School Board joins school boards across Ontario in celebrating Education Week from May 2-6, 2022. This year’s theme from the Ministry of Education is, Moving Forward. The HDSB will celebrate Education Week by focusing each day on one of the five areas of focus in the 2020-2024 Multi-Year Plan (MYP) to show the importance of schools, staff, families and the community working together to support the well-being and success of students.

Curtis Ennis, Director of Education for the HDSB. – seeing more interaction with the public than previous Directors.

Education Week provides an opportunity to demonstrate the deep and enriched learning that is taking place across the Halton District School Board,” says Curtis Ennis, Director of Education for the HDSB. “The week also allows us to reflect on the importance of a strong and vibrant education system. Learning is most successful when we create equitable conditions that support excellent outcomes for all students. We are excited to profile how engaged our schools and students have been this year and we look forward to continuing to focus on learning, engagement and success for all.”

Throughout the week, we will be sharing examples of how each of the five areas of focus in our Multi-Year Plan guide student and staff learning in classrooms and throughout the Board.

As a lead off to Education Week, the HDSB is also proud to be hosting a groundbreaking ceremony tomorrow (April 29) to celebrate the beginning of a new elementary school in Milton expected to open in the Fall of 2023. The school will accommodate 788 Kindergarten to Grade 8 students and will offer English and French Immersion.

Monday, May 2 – Equity and Inclusion: This area of focus shows how schools champion supportive and inclusive practices to ensure equitable access to positive opportunities and outcomes for all.

They arrive full of energy and enthusiasm – how different are they when they leave school ?

Tuesday, May 3 – Mental Health & Well-Being: This area of focus highlights how students strengthen safe and caring school environments that promote well-being, and enhance relationships and positive learning and working climates where everyone belongs and feels safe. May 2-8 is also Mental Health Week, as designated by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), which promotes mental health awareness, decreasing stigma and helpful resources.

Wednesday, May 4 – Environmental Leadership: This area shows how students and staff take action to help create a sustainable world and will be showcased to demonstrate how HDSB schools are providing opportunities to learn about connections between ecosystems, social justice and climate, as well as elevate local environmental initiatives and practices.

Thursday, May 5 – Learning & Achievement: Examples will be shared of how the HDSB strives to create learning environments to elevate student achievement, foster a culture of high expectations to maximize student and staff achievement and promote innovative strategies.

Also on May 5, the Board is proud to recognize the success of students through its annual Celebration of Student Excellence event. This virtual event will start at 7 p.m. Each year, one student per school is honoured for their excellence in self-improvement, enhancing the school and/or local community, citizenship, student leadership, academics, vocational studies and specialized programs or extra-curricular activities. A link to view the ceremony will be on the HDSB website (www.hdsb.ca) on Thursday, May 5 at 7 p.m. 

Friday, May 6 – Indigenous Perspectives & Awareness: On the final day of Education Week, the HDSB will highlight the many learning opportunities for students and staff that help promote knowledge and understanding of Indigenous perspectives and realities.

 

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Progressive Conservatives open their campaign office and put their candidate on display. Strong start.

By Pepper Parr

May 2nd, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

I had a rough idea of what Natalie Pierre would look like.

The picture the Progressive Conservative (PC) party provided was all I had to go on and very little information. When I walked into the campaign office at the intersection of Fairview and Appleby line I walked right past the woman.

I met her husband before I met her.

It took a bit too actually be able to sit down with the candidate and ask some questions. They offered to set up an interview at a later date – those offers seldom come to fruition.

Natalie Pierre on the right with one of the volunteers.

Natalie was born and raised in Hamilton, went to high school there and then on to McMaster where she earned a degree in Commerce.

She and her husband live in downtown Burlington.

Natalie worked at Sheridan College in the Human Resources sector for a number of years before that she was an auditor for the federal tax collector.

I tend to use first interviews to get a sense of the candidate. Do they have a direct eye contact look, are the stiff and anxious. Are they friendly?  Do they do more spinning than actually answering questions.

She came across to me as pretty solid

All the thoughts I had of Natalie Pierre faded away as we talked about her growing up and her experience in the work world.

I did learn that her appointment as the PC candidate for Burlington came from the head of the party who was permitted to make 10 appointments: Natalie was the third party appointment.

The Burlington Conservatives have had nomination problem for as long as I can remember.  The direct appointment looks as if it was a solid choice.  This woman is cut from a different kind of cloth than the incumbent.

She is smart and has this habit of reaching out and touching – she doesn’t actually reach out – but you are aware that she has touched you – ever so slightly and lightly. She communicates that way.

We didn’t talk about her views on PC policy and where she stood on climate change and the building of more highways. She is new to the game and if she didn’t support the party and its policies she would not have accepted the appointment as a candidate.

She will learn, if she is elected, how things work in the legislature and that if you have concerns they come out at caucus meetings.

PC campaign office at Fairview and Appleby Line

While the mental health of young people is a very big concern for Natalie Pierre this is not a one woman candidate.  Long term care, the funding of our hospitals and the huge surge in mental health needs are a natural focus.

At first I didn’t recognize Natalie while she going over a map of the riding with other woman. I saw someone with the capacity to absorb data and analyze what she was looking at.

Natalie Pierre with a front desk volunteer getting ready to do some door knocking.

The initial interview didn’t last all that long – she was getting ready to get out and do some door knocking.

We will watch how she does in the debates during the election that starts on Wednesday

The Progressive Conservatives in Burlington just might have gotten lucky and come up with a candidate that is not going to embarrass them and could well become a candidate that people will genuinely like and come to respect and admire.

Too early to say much more but Natalie Pierre is someone to watch.

It does not appear that the campaign team is going to wrap her in a bubble and keep her away from people and those pesky issued based questions

One last impression – I think she is a Habs fan

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Many people are not even aware that an election is to take place June 2nd.

By Jason Octavo

April 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A lot of people haven’t put their attention yet on the provincial election

I looked people who were out shopping and asked them about the provincial election. Public interest has yet to grow. It is going to be a short election

My assignment was to interview at least twenty people and ask if they knew about the provincial election that is expected to start next Wednesday with the ballots being counted on June 2nd.

Eleven out of the 20 people that I interviewed on the street said they did not know there was going to be a provincial election starting on Wednesday of next week.

Half said they are going to vote.

Only three out of 20 indicated who they were going to vote for.

One person said he knew there was going to be a provincial election, but didn’t know it was starting this coming Wednesday.

Five out of 20 said they are ineligible to vote (Four said they haven’t been in Canada long enough, one said she is underage). Seven out of 20 haven’t decided yet who they are going to vote for.

 

 

 

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Who should lead the province? A minority Progressive Conservative government looks like the best choice

By Pepper Parr

April 30th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

OPINION

The players in the provincial election that will begin on Wednesday are moving into the campaign offices during the weekend.

Burlington is caught up in the mini scandal over a Council member giving away information discussed in a Closed Session of Council and being sanctioned for her behaviour.

The attention being given the Integrity Commission report is going to have to be directed to the election of the next provincial government – where there are very real and very critical decisions to be made.

The manner in which the province has handled the pandemic and the approach they are taking to climate change are troubling.  In the past, Conservative parties have hidden their candidates and relied on their membership base to keep them in office.

Natalie Pierre – appointed not nominated but the Progressive Conservative candidate nevertheless.

This time around Natalie Pierre will be seen and heard today as the Progressive Conservatives open their campaign office.  How much the public sees and hears from her after that is questionable.

The same gang that managed the campaign of Emily Brown, is running the Natalie Pierre campaign.

In Brown they had a candidate who could have given Karina Gould a much more serious run – but the campaign directors wouldn’t let the public see or hear her – other than at political party events and the Chamber of Commerce debate.

Mariam Manaa – the Liberal candidate who won the nomination race to be the candidate.

However, there is a change taking place in Burlington that may well put Mariam Manaa, the Liberal candidate into a seat in the Legislature.

What is not yet clear is just how many Muslims there are in Burlington.

Manaa defeated Andrea Grebenc for the nomination to the surprise of many.  The number of votes the winner of a nomination receives is never made public so we don’t know just how many more votes Manaa got.

Statistics Canada has released new population numbers.  I expect that they will show a significant increase in the number of Muslims – those will all be Manaa votes.

Burlington has for a long time been a Conservative and a conservative city.  That day may be gone.  Karina Gould showed that Liberals can win and get re-elected as well.

Putting a Liberal in at Queen’s Park is the first step to getting Ontario the government it needs.

Don’t take that to mean that the province needs a Liberal government.  My view is that Stephen Del Duca would have difficulty putting together a government – is he going to win his own seat? and Andrea Horwath would not know how to lead a government.

Andrew Drummond – NDP candidate running for the third time.

Andrew Drummond, the NDP candidate in Burlington would be a fine MPP.

The choice for Ontario in my view is a minority Progressive Conservative government.  Doug Ford is his own worst enemy.  With a hobble on his ankle his government will get the province through two to three years during which the New Democrats can find the leader they need and the public can get a look at what kind of talent the Liberals were able to get elected.

It is going to be a short campaign, probably pretty rough as well.  Power is not easily taken away from those who hold it and there are a lot of wealthy vested interests that will do whatever they think is necessary to keep what they have.

We are in a time when huge changes are taking place.  Covid has whacked our economy; the hospitality sector came close to being wiped out.  The way organizations and corporations manage their employees is going through a change and the most recent climate change prediction talked in terms of years not decades.

How different Ontario looks on the morning of June 3rd is something that will get decided by the people in the province who think about what we are up against and then get out and vote.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

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Roland Tanner lets it rip: council is more toxic, more dysfunctional and more vile than the council that went before it.

By Pepper Parr

April 29th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Ten years ago, as a result of the Shape Burlington Report – the Gazette was born.

Since that time a number of “alternative” media have been created.

The Gazette was the first on-line newspaper to be accepted as a member of the Ontario Press Council which is now the National Newsmedia Council.

Roland Tanner as a candidate

Roland Tanner, a failed 2018 election candidate and his friend Joel McLeod created the 905er, a podcast that sees the 905 as its market – which is major undertaking.

Earlier this week Tanner got himself all wound up over the Statement Mayor Marianne Meed Ward issued – the result was a rant of staggering proportions.

We have excerpted parts of the 30 minute rant – click HERE if you want the full Monty.

“ It’s obviously down to councils to agree or disagree with the recommendations for the Integrity Commissioner” said Tanner who went on to say:

The issue I really took exception to was statement that that it took courage for the two councillors Rory Nisan and Kelven Galbraith to request an investigation. And I cannot see that; you know, if there is an example of punching down by the strong side of council on the weaker side, this is it.

Shawna Stolte was on her own; she has the sympathy of at least one other counsellor but she was basically alone in this campaign for increased openness and against what she claims is the overuse of closed session meetings.

And here we have the gang; the rest of council to a large extent, using every tool that they can to shut her up and ultimately to force her out of what would certainly be quite an easy re-election campaign.

What I find to primly ironic is that Meed Ward, who for the best part of a decade, was a one person outsider on Council, who put up with some really atrocious behaviour from other counsellors.

There is an issue here with openness and transparency, which was a core tenant of what this council was supposed to be about.

We’re going to in camera, we don’t know necessarily why, we have a vague idea. We don’t know what was discussed what was decided.

The Mayor doesn’t address that at all in her statement. She doesn’t go to say yeah, you know what, she’s right (meaning Stolte). We should be more open about these things. But we aren’t we’re going to address that but we are going to stick to the rules: and she has to be penalized for it.

Shawna Stolte – Councillor for ward 4.

No, it was How dare she? How dare she? The meeting was supposed to be a secret.

I found it a bit sanctimonious her praising Counsellors Rory Nissan and Kevin Galbraith. I’m going to quote directly from the statement

“It took courage for Counsellors Rory Nissan and Kevin Galbraith to request an investigation. They knew the report and their identities would be public. They’ve received unwarranted criticism for doing exactly what the code requires of all members of council to hold each other accountable to our obligations under the code and the legislative provisions of the Ontario Municipal act that all members of council swear an oath of office to uphold.”

So my question is Why was her name not on the complaint that was made? Where was her leadership on this?

You know, this idea that there’s been a breach of public trust and that the city has been harmed by this.

No, it hasn’t remotely been harmed by anything that was revealed by Shawna Stolte – what was revealed was so piddling and inconsequential – basically Stolte gave the address of a house to a constituent – everybody knew, and a number that is not actually a number. It was a number of a much bigger thing. And the whole point of that number is that there is a number that has to be secret, and that is quite rightly protected,

Marianne Meed Ward as Mayor

The Mayor comes into to say there’s a breach of public trust, because counsel can no longer be confident that what they bring forward in a confidential session will remain so that compromises their ability to have robust discussions, or to make the best decisions for the community a community loses.

At this point Joel McLeod cuts in and said: Now I have an issue with this because we don’t know that they were talking about. It’s this arrogance that council knows what’s best. So therefore the council can just do what it wants.

Tanner returns saying “People are rightfully upset with how Stolte was treated. She is a she is very much a beloved counsellor, a counsellor that people respect and people say she’s in it for the right reasons. She’s in it to make the community better for her neighbours. She just wants to make them better. And a lot of people are viewing her as one of the good guys.

Counsel is being viewed as bullies in the story. And I would argue that the rest of council has breached public trust because people understand what they say.

Why is the purchase of Bateman so secretive? Why is it that everything has to be done behind closed doors? The simple question of why do we need to buy this building has not been satisfied to the public satisfaction

 

An impressive piece of land, lots of ideas on how it can be used – not much in the way of information on what it is going to cost. Removing the asbestos from the buildings is going to expensive

 

The is the conceptual plan show who will be using what part of the Bateman high school site. Council, the City manager and the city solicitor have taken the position that all of this has to be discussed in a Closed session of Council.

Nobody knows what are we going to do with it? Why do we need this in our inventory as a city and why are we going to go into city reserves to get it? And that’s something that probably, may not the best way to do it. But someone has a valid point say that people deserve to know this. And if people say, Well, I don’t care if it’s a Brock University, Brock gets a teacher’s college. Library gets another branch.

You know, it suits the ward five Councillor because it’s in his ward, suits the city because they get to say, hey, we’ve got a university in our city.

And if you want to build a legacy project, the best way to do that is to try not to talk about the money that’s involved because legacy projects are always expensive.

They have to answer to the public for the decisions they’re making. Decisions that are made in private are not in the best interest of the public.

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward during the session of council at which the Integrity Commission report was received.

In her closing statement the Mayor said I stand by all the decisions we have made in closed session and look forward to in the details of the two matters that led to the breach of confidentiality can be made public, that time will come in a matter of months for both I welcome the opportunity to provide my take and explain my vote to the community.

Here’s my issue with this in camera.

They say yeah, we’re gonna buy Robert Bateman for this price. Except here’s the thing everyone’s gonna say, really? Is this a good deal? Is this going to last longer than the pride sidewalks outside of the Halton Catholic school board because, you know we dipped into reserve funds for that and that didn’t even last a year.

This patronizing tone of just wait, see, we’ll talk we’ll tell you later. What will tell you eventually? No, we’re adults, we’re supposed to be informed citizens here. You don’t make the decisions for you. We get to tell you how we want you to vote.

This is where you get to with a culture of secrecy at City Halls. And it’s not just counsellors and mentors who are part of that; staff are part of it too. Because very often, the interests of counsellors keeping things quiet and the interest of staff keeping things quiet, come together.
We are reliant on counsellors like Shawna Stolte who are willing to lose a career over it because they want to serve the public to stand up for us for years and years and years.

Roland Tanner delegating at city council

So God dammit in Burlington, you shape up; you have made a fool of yourself. You have damaged public trust, but not because of the actions Shawna Stolte took but because of the disgraceful way you’ve treated a decent counsellor who is nobody’s rebel, who is nobody’s troublemaker, but who will certainly put the interests of what she feels the public interest ahead of her career and ahead of the careers of people who are just trying to build legacies so that they can point election time to look what a nice thing we bought, you will give me your vote.

If we’re talking about a new type of council after 2018, with a new tone, my God, that’s gone.

This council is more toxic, more dysfunctional and more vile than the council that went before it. And boy, is that saying something?

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A chance to play a part in Re-Imagining Education - right here in the Region of Halton

By Pepper Parr

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton District School Board trustees came to the realization that the classroom level experience during the past two years was something that had to be looked at – in a positive manner.

Five of the 24 trustees formed a planning group and wrote the Minister of Education in February of 2021 – they didn’t get an answer and decided rather than wait on the Minister to respond to their idea they broke out on their own.

The Planning Group consists of:

  • Tracey Ehl Harrison (Chair & Site Admin)
  • Andrea Grebenc (Site Admin)
  • Joanna Oliver
  • Leah Reynolds
  • Margo Shuttleworth

The result is an imaginative and bold for trustees initiative that could produce some interesting ideas – it is now up to the community to respond.  Everyone has an opinion on education – let us see if those with opinions have any original ideas or social imagination.

Through a new initiative called Reimagine Forward, Trustees of the Halton District School Board are asking the Halton community and beyond to reimagine education by sharing ideas and stories to develop big-picture, innovative opportunities about how the publicly-funded school system in Ontario can evolve. Parents/guardians, students, staff, community and education partners are invited to provide their ideas and stories at engagehdsb.ca starting today until May 28.

Here’s the question:

“What are the big moves needed to reimagine public education?”

This is the singular focus of Reimagine.  Think big. Think positive. Be innovative. The secret sauce is here among us.

HDSB Chair Margo Shuttleworth

Reimagine is a grassroots project initiated and led by the HDSB Trustees. Submitted ideas will be reviewed by Trustees to influence local policy making and will be shared with participants, the Minister of Education and other Ontario school boards and education organizations in June.

We promise to:

read all of your ideas and stories and let them influence local policy making.

package up all of the ideas and stories in early June and share them with you, the Minister of Education, Boards from across the province and education organizations. You can share the findings too. We’ll share them here and at the Board table.

Please spread the word by inviting your friends, family, neighbours, and colleagues to this site and by tagging @HaltonDSB

Register and participate anytime until May 28TH.

Positive change starts with thinking about and reimagining public education. Let’s work together to share stories and ideas. Please add yours. And, stay for a while to check out all of the contributions.

You are Invited! Let’s Reimagine -Together.

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Unaffordable housing is bad for everyone: many don’t want to discuss real solutions

By Connor Fraser,

April 28th ,2022

BURLINGTON, ON

OPINION

 

Everyone is keenly aware of how unaffordable housing has become in our community and across other regions of the province. Many young people are now facing the reality of never being able to own in the region where they grew up. They are making tough decisions to live farther and farther away from work, and endure gruelling commutes that will impact their mental health and the environment. Darrell Bricker of Ipsos Public Affairs observed in a recent interview for the Ontario 360 Initiative that the outlook of Ontarians (and in particular young Ontarians) for their futures, has darkened, driven in large part by declining housing affordability.

While on the surface it may seem like just another issue, unaffordability has been created by diverse and complicated factors. Its costs are moreover sinister and threaten the future quality of life for all Ontarians.

There are very few locations where new single detached homes are being built – it is all high rise for Burlington going forward.

Since the 1960’s municipal zoning bylaws have set us on a collision course with this problem. Vast tracts of land are “locked up” with low-density, single-detached designations. Any attempt to introduce higher density (even modest 3 or 4 storey multi-units) are met with arguments of “neighbourhood character preservation” and ferocious opposition from existing homeowners. While “NIMBYs” perpetuate the problem and are convenient scapegoats, they are not responsible for decades-old zoning bylaws.

I am genuinely concerned that we have not learned any lessons in Ontario. Low-density urban sprawl continues at breakneck speeds. New development must be encouraged, but with an eye for much higher density and transit-oriented communities.

This connects with the second and perhaps most sinister and intractable cause of unaffordable housing: Significant numbers of Ontarian’s want low-density housing. The Anglo-American mindset romanticizes fierce independence and individualism. Unless you’ve got a driveway and your own tiny patch of grass, you’re not successful. Ironically, many of my friends who complain about skyrocketing prices are adamant in their desire to own a single-detached house. It’s understandable that many keenly aspire to a goal that was attainable for older generations – but I think it’s more important to realize that those goals may have been unsustainable. Regretfully, convincing so many that fulfilling lives may still exist within higher density settings (take Quebec as a good example) is a politically suicidal task.

The costs of unaffordable housing are immense. The future economic growth (and in turn quality of life and government services) of Ontario and Burlington relies upon attracting top employees and firms. Many investments have been made to transform Toronto and the GTA into a technology hub and take advantage of the intangible economy. Expensive housing and long commutes threaten that transformation. They are major obstacles to those considering whether to make Ontario their home. If you’re someone opposed to urban intensification in Burlington or elsewhere, consider that in 30 – 40 years you’ll likely need and want timely and effective healthcare services. Who’s going to pay for it if those who would’ve lived here and created value with their talent, have been driven from the province by unaffordability, thereby crippling the tax base?

Pierre Poilievre: targeting his message to people who are angry.

Rising home prices also open the door for populist leaders on the fringes of the political spectrum to gain power by capitalizing on anger. Under normal circumstances, such individuals would never be considered for public office. The federal Conservative leadership race has already seen examples of candidates trying to exploit anger over house prices and inflation for political gain.

I don’t see this problem being resolved in the near future. The composition of infrastructure changes very slowly, many aspire to live in low-density settings, and there are limited options for English-speaking young people in Canada: This is a slight simplification, but all the best jobs are in Toronto or Vancouver.

At the very least, the province must intervene by overriding municipal zoning bylaws to promote “missing middle” 3-4 storey multi-unit housing. Furthermore, the province could become more aggressive with mandating that all new development be higher density and transit oriented.

Could Perth, ON close to Ottawa with a lovely idyllic setting be made a larger community? The locals wouldn’t buy it

Other options that should be explored include actively building out secondary urban centres within Canada, and making these locations attractive to live. Even within Ontario, there are many regions that might be targeted for significant growth, such as Windsor and Thunder Bay. With a limited number of serious economic hubs compared to the United States, we risk over-concentrating demand for housing to an extent that local actors cannot solve.

The ultimate solution to this problem is compromise. On one hand, those in existing neighbourhoods should reflect that low-density housing was always an unsustainable, exclusive and very costly goal. Moreover, young people and those hoping to start families should reflect that remaining attached to an unsustainable ideal is going to make their lives unnecessarily difficult and unhappy. For the simple reason that many are unwilling to compromise, unaffordable housing is here to stay.

Connor Fraser is a post graduate student at the University of Toronto enrolled in the dual Master of Global Affairs and Master of Business Administration program.

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How Not to Get Mad at Loved Ones: 6 Ways to Manage Emotions

By Kate Brown

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Everyone experiences negative emotions from time to time. You may have been taught as a child to suppress them, but it’s natural to be angry. The main thing is not to let your feelings become the reason for quarrels with other people. You can learn to control anger by understanding what causes it and expressing it in healthier ways.

Imagine the situation: you boil when the boss asks you to do extra work. Perhaps it’s not the first time it’s happened because another employee has again failed to complete his duties on time. You’re fed up and feel like you’re about to explode. Then you gather your coworkers and tell them what you think of them. Gradually your anger fades and you feel better, but you realize from the surprised looks on the faces of those around you that this was not the best way to deal with your emotions.

Usually the cause of anger is an underlying problem. It’s possible that you’re tired of doing everything for everyone at work and it’s high time you built personal boundaries. You no longer want to take on the responsibilities of colleagues who are not up to the task. Anger and quarrels will not help change the situation, it’s much more productive to learn to express emotions in other ways.

How to Control Anger
There are several ways to control anger. By following the simple instructions on this list, you can activate your parasympathetic nervous system, which means you can calm down and relax. You’ll cope with anxiety and stress, your mood will improve, and your blood pressure will return to normal. Here’s what will help you not snap when you’re experiencing strong negative emotions.

Take a Break
Take time out and go for a short walk. This will allow you to reflect for a while before reacting to events emotionally. Go outside, feel the warmth of the sun, listen to the leaves rustling in the wind. Focus your attention on the world around you. Forget about the most pleasurable things, like gambling at a Canadian casino online or your favorite movie you’ve watched recently. This will activate your frontal cortex, and strong negative emotions will subside.

Awareness or Short Meditation
Close your eyes, slow your breathing, and allow yourself to calm down, relaxing your whole body. Take your mind to a place where you once felt happy. It could be the seashore, the mountains, or the arms of a loved one.

Writing a journal is an opportunity to put your feelings down on paper – you’ll be surprised how you feel when you go back and read them later.

Write a Diary
When you are angry, write an uncensored letter to the person who triggered your negative emotion. You can do this on paper or in your smartphone notes. Afterwards, reread the letter and try to figure out what experiences caused you to defend yourself through anger. Perhaps you feel humiliated or you are frightened by uncertainty. There is no need to send the letter to the addressee; it’s better to tear up the sheet or erase what you have written. This kind of practice helps you to structure your thoughts, find the true causes of your emotions, and cope with stress.

Deep Breathing
This method of anger management seems too simple, but it really works. The key is to start using it. If you are boiling over, but you cannot leave the room and need to continue talking to the person who provoked the negative emotion in you, turn away to breathe and count to ten. During this time, you will be able to determine the cause of your anger and outline a plan of action.

Exercise
If you are overcome by anger, do some simple exercises or swim in the pool. Exercise releases endorphins that make you feel better. It’s impossible to leave a workout with the same level of stress that you came to class with. Your anxiety level will decrease, making it easier for you to make informed decisions.

Anti-stress Accessories
The easiest and most affordable of these is a wrist expander. Squeeze and unclench the exercises in the palms of your hands. Monotonous actions will help to cope with stress and relax. Bonus – strong hands and excellent grip, the main thing – do not forget to change hands periodically. “I-affirmations.”

If you feel yourself boiling over, directly (but calmly) tell the person you’re talking to what you think about what’s going on. Use “I-affirmations” and don’t get personal. For example, you might say to your boss, “I’m puzzled by what you said.” My part of the project was done yesterday.” Such communication will provide new information and allow your boss to see the situation from a new perspective.

Speaking calmly and directly – takes the heat out of a conversation

Regardless of which way you choose to deal with your emotions, it’s important to identify the cause of your anger and recognize the difference between healthy and chronic stress. Understanding what makes you angry will help you deal with future outbursts of anger. If your anger is related to the other person’s actions, let them know how and why their actions affect you. The conversation should begin in a calm atmosphere – after you can pull yourself together. Together with the person, you are talking to, come up with a plan for how to communicate in the future.

Take time to get to know yourself better and develop emotional intelligence. If you learn to manage your emotions and stop snapping at others, you can strengthen communication and make your relationship healthier.

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Can Burlington do what Milton is setting out to do - rescue the citizens of the city.

By Pepper Parr

April 28th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If Milton can do it – Burlington certainly can.

The Milton Chamber of Commerce has partnered with Bell as a Community and are putting together what they will bring to an and this once-in-a-lifetime experience we have all been working through.

So many of us have been working remotely and not able to network and gather like we once did.
Milton is setting out to change that – Burlington has the capacity to do that.

Rotary managed to rescue and event despite COVID19 – how can Burlington create an event to rescue its citizensÉ

Rotary found a way to take over the Burlington Centre parking lot for their modified Rib Fest – perhaps the Chamber can do something similar.

The Milton Chamber is calling their event the ‘Welcome Back from Hibernation BBQ’ to network, see new and familiar faces, enjoy local food and drink, all while enjoying some music.

Watching and waiting to see what might come out of the woods in Burlington.

 

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PC's to kick off their campaign on Saturday.

By Staff

April 27th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Natalie Pierre, Progressive Conservative candidate for Burlington.

The race is on.

The Liberals announced their election office opening for Sunday.

Learned earlier today that the Progressive Conservatives are going to do them one better and open their office at noon on Saturday in the plaza at Fairview and Appleby Line.  South Western corner of the intersection.

Expect the federal candidate in the last election to be on hand to show Natalie Pierre the ropes.

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Portrait Gallery of Canada names new executive director: Robert Steven, former AGB President & CEO starts next week

By Staff

April 27th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Some people manage to land on their feet when their job gets taken away from them

The Board of Directors of the Portrait Gallery of Canada (PGC) is pleased to announce that it has appointed Robert Steven, former president and CEO of the Art Gallery of Burlington, as its new executive director, effective May 2, 2022. Robert Steven will succeed Joanne Charette who has led the PGC through its first year of operation.

“Robert Steven is passionate about social issues and brings an excellent appreciation for the richness and diversity of the peoples who live in Canada,” said Lawson Hunter, Chair, Board of Directors, Portrait Gallery of Canada. “The Board was impressed by his demonstrated ability to rally community support for cultural projects from the ground up; his insight in current museum issues and practices; and his leadership experience. We look forward to working with him as we move forward with our vision to build a physical presence in the nation’s capital.”

Reporting to the Board of Directors, Robert Steven will play a highly visible role, representing and enhancing the positive reputation of the PGC with government officials, funding agencies, donors and the public. Steven will also be responsible for developing the PGC’s vision and strategic and operational plans; building on the PGC’s dynamic online exhibition and public programs; directing human resources and volunteers; managing financial resources; and advancing and tracking the progress and success of PGC initiatives.

“I am delighted and honoured by this opportunity to join with the exceptionally distinguished group of visionary leaders whose tireless work to create this important institution has brought the organization so far in such a short time,” said incoming executive director Robert Steven.

“To be part of the growth and development of such an ambitious new museum, dedicated to the individuals and identities found in this place we now call Canada—at this significant moment when the opportunities for mutual understanding, conciliation and systemic change are both greater and more urgent than ever before—is no less than a dream come true. It is the opportunity of a lifetime for anyone who believes in the impact that the experience of museums and of works of art can have on the lives of individuals and of communities,” Steven added.

“On behalf of the Portrait Gallery of Canada’s Board of Directors, I would like to thank Joanne Charette, who stepped out of retirement to assume the role of interim director while we were building our online presence,” said Lawson Hunter. “The PGC benefited from Joanne’s leadership experience with the Canadian Museum of Nature and the National Gallery of Canada, and we are grateful to her for her work ethic and commitment to our young
not-for-profit corporation.”

Robert Steven, former head of AGB will lead the Portrait Gallery of Canada

About Robert Steven
Robert Steven is a dedicated, forward-thinking and accomplished leader of arts and heritage institutions. He brings years of experience at the executive level, including six years as president and CEO of the Art Gallery of Burlington in Ontario and seven years as executive director and curator of the Art Gallery of Grande Prairie in Alberta. Robert Steven holds a Bachelor of Arts, Honours Fine Arts Studio, from the University of Waterloo, and a Master of Museum Studies from the University of Toronto.

He also successfully completed the Museum Leadership Institute Program at the Getty Leadership Institute in Los Angeles, an intensive course for museum executives that addresses current trends and challenges in the museum field, leadership, strategy, organisational culture and change management. Robert Steven was named one of Alberta’s 50 Most Influential People in 2013 by Alberta Venture Magazine. He was honoured with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012 and served on the Government of Alberta’s Premier’s Council for Arts and Culture in 2009. As well, he currently serves as Vice President of Galeries Ontario/Ontario Galleries (formerly the Ontario Association of Art Galleries).

 

 

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Liberals to open their campaign office on Sunday

By Staff

April 27th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

Mariam Manaa

 

For those of you who think as Liberals, you will want to know that the Burlington Liberal candidate, Mariam Manaa will be  holding the Official Opening of her campaign office that will be located at 790 Guelph Line, unit 4

The event will take place at 3:00 pm this Sunday and feature Burlington MP and Cabinet Minister Karina Gould.

The city has yet to see the Progressive Conservative candidate Natalie Pierre.

Will the Mayor Meed Ward be on hand – don’t count on that.

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Art Gallery Guilds - the foundation the AGB was built on - holding their All Guild Exhibit April 29 to August 13th

By Staff

April 26th, 2022

BURLINGTON, ON

 

One of the things that makes the Art Gallery difference and distinct are the Guilds.

They are the foundation on which the Gallery as it exists today was built

Friday the Guilds come together and show the public what they have been doing while the pandemic took away the opportunity to visit the Gallery and enjoy what it has to offer.

A day or so ago we were shown a photograph taken by Frank Meyers that has been accepted for the Exhibition that opens on Friday.

A Frank Meyer photograph that has been accepted for the All Guilds Exhibition that opens on Friday

 

Attend and see what else they have to share.

The annual exhibition celebrates the guilds who make, learn, share, and teach at the Art Gallery of Burlington.

Burlington Fine Arts Association,

Burlington Handweavers and Spinners Guild,

Latow Photographers Guild,

Burlington Potters Guild,

Burlington Hooking Craft Guild,

Burlington Sculptors and Carvers,

Digital Arts Guild of Burlington.

Exhibition runs through to August 13th

AGB Hours

Tuesday – Friday 12 PM – 5 PM
Saturday 10 AM – 5 PM
Sunday & Monday CLOSED

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