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City of Burlington recreational facilities and vaccine status

By Staff

October 20th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City of Burlington will continue to follow the Provincial mandate and require proof of vaccination in City recreational facilities for all who are eligible for the vaccines.

City-operated services and facilities not impacted include:

  • City Hall at 426 Brant St.
  • Outdoor sports fields
  • Diamonds, parks and playgrounds
  • Burlington Transit
  • Halton Court Services

Parents can watch – but they must show their proof of vaccination papers.

To enter a City facility, visitors will need to show a piece of identification with their name and date of birth and either:

• Show their vaccine certificate with QR code (paper or electronic), or
• Show their vaccination receipt (paper or electronic)

Parents and/or guardians may enter a facility for a maximum of 15 minutes to drop off and pick-up a participant for a program, without showing proof of vaccination. Parents who are required to stay in the facility for the duration of the program must be fully vaccinated.

All current regulations around screening, masking and physical distancing will not change based vaccine status.
To download your vaccine certificate, go to ontario.ca/get-proof.

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Making decisions: Soon maybe on some key issues

By Pepper Parr

October 20th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

To get some sense as to where your ship is going – you want to know something about the person at the wheel and the decisions they make.

Same rule applies to the Mayor of Burlington.

There have been some very good decisions. The decision to have the Urban Growth Centre moved north was a good decision.

A smart lawyer and a planning department that didn’t understand just what the concept of Mobility Hubs (now called MTSA’s) was all about.

The Mayor was dead on about the bus station that was declared a Major Transit Service Area – as soon as she had all the information she saw the obvious.

The disturbing part of that was that the council that served from 2010 to 2018 neither knew or weren’t told by the planning department that the designation given that bus station was an error. Instead they left it in place and the result is the 26 storey Nautique that is now under construction.

Someone in Planning should be wearing that one.

Meed Ward understood the mood of the electorate and chose limiting development and making sure that the development that was coming was the right kind in the right place.

She basically chased the developers out of the downtown core.

Admittedly there are a number (about four with several pieces of land within the football that have not been dealt with) of development along Lakeshore Road and within the football that are a problem.

Mayor Meed Ward does not appear to be ready to take a position on the re-development of the Waterfront Hotel site. Is this one of those “right things in the right place”?

And of course there is the Waterfront Hotel development that could take the growth of the city as we know it today in a much different direction.

Perhaps it is time to think in terms of how Burlington could adapt to the change and make it work for them. We don’t see the city planning department getting in front of issues and being proactive.

The decisions in front of the Mayor now that are a concern are:

The Holiday market, which is now  a done deal that got through Council under the shadiest of circumstances;

The park within the Molinaro development at Brant & Ghent;

The Waterfront Hotel site and the redevelopment of that property; and

her enthusiasm for the Holiday market scheduled for December 9th to 12. The Mayor buys into the claim that 1000 people will take part. What that market will do to the merchants in the downtown core who are struggling to stay above water is something they Mayor doesn’t seem prepared to take into account.

Very recently the Molinaro Group took part in a Statutory meeting in which they revealed their plans for a half acre park that would be created at the east end of the development at Brant and Ghent.

Traffic for the towers on either side of Brant would exit and enter via Ghent. The half acre park is shown on the far right. Title to the land would be registered with the Condominium Corporation .

The plan was to create the park, then turn it over to the condominium corporation that would eventually be set up to represent the interests of the condominium unit owners.

The idea that the unit owners will go along with their owning and maintaining a park that would be open to the public is a real stretch.

Anyone who has served on a condominium board would tell you that this is one of the craziest things they have ever heard of.

This is described as a half acre part which was described as bringing some of Spencer Smith Park north

The Mayor seems to think that the city would get another park at no cost and residents of a condominium will cover the costs of keeping it operational.

Renderings on what a park could look like.

Will the information about the park for which unit buyers will have to be clearly set out in the sales literature? Will it be clearly set out in the condominium agreement – those things run to several hundred pages which only the lawyers read.

The Mayor does not appear to have taken a position on the proposed redevelopment of the Waterfront Hotel site. One has to ask: Where is the claim that this Mayor wants the right development in the right place ?

There was a time when Meed Ward was all about Truth to Power – now that she has the power Truth seems to have been mislaid.

Growing from a really ballsy ward councillor who brought about some significant changes to the way the city operates, we appear to have a Mayor who has lost the wind she used to have in her sails.

She has pulled together a large part of her re-election team and she is in campaign mode.

Ward 5 Councillor Paul Sharman – considering his options?

And at this point there doesn’t appear to be anyone willing to run against her – except for Councillor Sharman who is probably considering his option.

Go for it Paul!

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

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Burlington Residents Can Now Enjoy an Interactive Exhibition on Artwork at the Royal Botanical Gardens

By Mark Maycock

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If you weren’t yet aware, many things are going on in the area these days, and many residents are enjoying the autumn season.

Those who have been raring to go out can do so with more enjoyment if they visit the Royal Botanical Gardens – where there is an ongoing interactive exhibition on artwork.

Seeing the Invisible at Royal Botanical Gardens

The exhibition, entitled ‘Seeing the Invisible,’ is arguably the most expansive and ambitious exhibition the Gardens has to date. It features a range of contemporary and modern artwork complemented by AR or augmented reality technology.

What it is

We can’t deny the significance of this exhibition, especially since it uses AR technology, which is astounding in many ways. But what exactly is AR? AR or augmented reality is a technology that can add or augment any viewer’s perception of their environment. In most cases, the digital info is superimposed on a real-life setting, but this is fixed in a specific place. At the same time, the user or viewer moves around the environment or moves their gadget around the environment.

The exhibit itself was developed in partnership with other botanical gardens worldwide, and Seeing the Invisible was first launched on September 23 as a participating botanical garden among a total of 12 in various countries. It’s worth noting, however, that it’s the only participating botanical garden in Canada.

What you can expect

The exhibition features work from over a dozen global artists. Its theme expounds on the wonders of nature, sustainability, and the environment, delivering an exploration of connections and boundaries between nature, technology, and art.

Hendrie Gardens at the Royal Botanical Gardens – a world class location

You can engage with the exhibition once you download an app, and it fosters brilliant collaboration between audiences, institutions, and artists. It’s a great way to emphasize and showcase how art can bring people together. Once you’re in the app, you will come across 13 interactive and unique artworks, and these are all spread around the landscape of Hendrie Gardens.   You can even take photos with the larger-than-life artwork, and you can essentially walk around the exhibit and listen to an audio plugin that makes your experience even more artistic and memorable.

The exhibit is now at Hendrie Gardens, and anyone can visit it from Thursday to Sunday. Seeing the Invisible runs until the 6th of November, and it operates between the hours of 10 in the morning until 5 in the afternoon.

The details

To attend, you can pre-register and buy a ticket, and when you purchase your ticket, you will have to choose your preferred time and date. There are six slots; namely, 10 am, 11 am, 12 noon, 1 pm, 2 pm, and 3 in the afternoon.

Tickets cost $24.50 for general admission and only $21.50 for senior citizens and students/youth, with ticket prices at $16.50 for kids aged 4 to 12 and only $2 for members of the Royal Botanical Gardens.

It’s good news for those who are still spending a lot of time at home during the pandemic. But if you want to make more of your time at home, you can also play in an online casino in Canada – who knows, luck may be on your side after you’ve been inspired by the gorgeous interactive technology and the artwork you’ve just experienced.

 

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Tanlsey Woods Pool to be reopened on Wednesday

By Staff

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is one of those clear as mud messages from city hall.

The Tansley Woods pool will be open on Wednesday.

If you use the Tansley Wood Pool you might understand.

Updated: Tansley Woods Pool Closure

The issue will be resolved by the end of today (Tuesday, Oct. 19) and regularly scheduled aquatic programming will resume for Wednesday, Oct. 20.

Due to an unplanned maintenance issue, Tansley Woods Pool will be closed effective immediately (Friday, Oct. 15, 2021) until further notice. Staff will reach out to impacted customers and renters. The facility is still open for non-aquatic programming.

Update: The issue will be resolved by the end of today (Tuesday, Oct. 19) and regularly scheduled aquatic programming will resume for Wednesday, Oct. 20.

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Covid19 rules for sports situations are tightened up by Medical Officer of Health

By Staff

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Halton Region’s Medical Officer of Health (MOH), Dr. Hamidah Meghani, has issued a letter of instructions to indoor sports and recreational fitness facilities to implement vaccination policies that require all eligible individuals to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to participate in organized sports and recreational fitness activities in these settings.

For businesses and organizations, this means establishing, implementing and ensuring compliance with a COVID-19 vaccination policy by no later than November 26, 2021 for all persons 12 years and older who attend an indoor area of the indoor sport or recreational facility for the purpose of actively participating, coaching, training, instructing, officiating or having similar involvement in organized sports and recreational fitness activities.

These instructions are being introduced to minimize the spread of COVID-19 and outbreaks, further protecting the health of all participants, coaches, officials, volunteers, spectators and others including those with weaker immune systems or who cannot be vaccinated because of their age or for medical reasons.

Robust compliance with masking, physical distancing and other public health measures in all facilities used for sports and recreational fitness activities in Halton Region also remains essential to protect our community.

To read Dr. Meghani’s instructions for indoor sports and recreational fitness activities or for additional public health information and guidance, please visit halton.ca/COVID19.

 

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Average price paid for condo unit was a record-smashing $704,000.

By Staff

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The big story in September were condos in Burlington.

Average sale prices were up an astonishing 32.3%, price per square foot was up 26.9%, and sales were up for the first time since June at 7.6% in September, as compared to September 2020.

The average price paid for a condo apartment unit between $200,000 and $2,000,000 was a record-smashing $704,000.

The average in August was $601,000, and July was $565,000. A truly incredible development, certainly spurred by the high prices of traditional homes.

Condo apartments sold for 101.46% of the listed price and in an average of 15 days.

Inventory levels were at 32 active listings, down considerably from the 5 year average of 89. Year to date, sale prices had increased by just over 18.9% and price per square foot had increased by just over 18% when compared to the same period in 2020.

 

 

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Development for Brant and Lakeshore could change what Downtown would look like

By Pepper Parr

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

From time to time there are news stories that grow to something more than a one or two day event.

We have covered a few that were significant – and important.

The legal problems surrounding the pier: when a crane toppled and steel that bent much more than was expected was found to be below the required standard.

It was a Pier that was built twice – at double the cost

The end result was the tearing apart of much of the first version of the Pier and starting all over at double the projected cost.

Another important event was the dumping of un-inspected land fill on the Burlington airport lands without the required permits.

We followed that story for three years, stayed strong during the libel suit that was filed against the Gazette and Vanessa Warren and Monte Dennis.

Tonnes of landfill from unknown sources was dumped on the air park lands. It is still there ruining at least one property for which there was never any compensation.

The libel suit was dropped but the land fill is still on the site – and the city is the poorer by half a million in legal fees.

Then there is decision on the part of Vrancor, owners of the Waterfront Hotel, who are expected to take the first required step to demolish the hotel and replace the 9 storey building with a 35 story tower and a 30 story tower that would sit atop a four storey tower.

There are those who like the idea; there are those who think it is a mistake.  The Plan B group certainly think it is a mistake.

The design of the towers is striking – it would be nice to live in it – but the Gazette does not believe those towers should be built on the Waterfront Hotel site.

During the pre-application presentation both the Mayor and the ward Councillor were given the right to speak. Neither made comments for which they will be remembered.

When first running for City Councillor Marianne Meed Ward was leading the Save our Waterfront Committee, demanding that the city not permit high rise towers anywhere near the lake.

The waterfront is once again at risk

Ten years later and all the Mayor had to say during the pre-application presentation was that the city had yet to receive an application. The first rule of stopping a development is to do everything possible to prevent it getting momentum.

If the Mayor is opposed to this development – and it this point we don’t know if she is or if she isn’t – saying nothing is not what the citizens of Burlington elected her for.

She was noisy noisy about Saving the Waterfront in 2010; she was noisy noisy when it came to pushing to get the Urban Growth Centre moved north and away from the Downtown Core in 2018.

She was close to mute when she had a chance to say something about two towers that would loom over Lakeshore Road if they are built.

The Gazette is of the view that few people fully understand what is taking place. There were less than 100 citizens participating in the virtual pre-application presentation.

In the two pictures set out below we try to give people an idea of what a 35 storey tower looks like when compared to what already exists on Lakeshore Road.

The tower on the left is expected to be on the Brant Street side of the development. It is 39 storeys high, the Hotel is 9 storeys high which would make the development more than four times as high as the current structure.

When set against what is currently the highest building in the city the difference is also very significant.

The Waterfront hotel – stands 9 storeys high.

Bridgewater condominium, currently the tallest structure in the city.

The tower on the right would be next to the Bridgewater development and at 30 storeys plus a four level podium come in at 35 storeys – one third higher than the Bridgewater condominium.

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A hot market: average sale price up 20.8% year over year - inventory close to record low levels

By Staff

October 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Despite Covid19, or perhaps because of it, the real estate markets have been busy.

A Real Estate Market Insight of residential properties sold during September and provided by the Rocca Sisters, an established real estate firm, is set out below.

With another record breaking average sale price of $1,310,309, up 20.8% year over year, sales were down by 39.4% when compared to September 2020.

Inventory continues to be historically low. On average, for the past 5 years, there were 338 active freehold listings between $500,000 and $4,000,000 at the end of September.

At the end of September 2021, there were 72.

During the month of September properties sold for 107.99% of the listed price and in an average of 9 days (compared to 13 days in August) and a slightly higher list/sale price ratio in June when it was 105.19%.

The remarkable sales always referred to in months gone by are becoming less and less remarkable and more and more predictable. The lack of inventory and large pool of buyers is continuing to push quick sales for more than top dollar.

Sales by market sector are set out below.

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Land Tribunal lifts Interim Control Bylaw on everything except properties between Brant and Drury on Fairview

By Pepper Parr

October 18th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Following the proceedings at an Ontario Land Tribunal hearing is not for the faint of heart.

It seems to take forever to get to the point where a hearing actually takes place.

Actually getting to a hearing for development applications in Burlington is complicated by the fact that there are at times more than a dozen developers appealing a city decision or appealing for relief from the OLT because the city has not made a decision before the clock ran out.

Among the issues before the OLT at this time are the Interim Control By Law and the newest Official Plan that has been approved by City Council and Regional Council and awaits the signature of the Minister of Housing and Municipal Affairs after which it becomes the law of the land.

Controversial from the very beginning, the long term care residence got caught up in the creation of an Interim Control Bylaw

The ICBL was holding up all kinds of development including the AMICA project that will rise on the Northshore Road and the ramp to the QEW.

At the OLT Case Management Conference last Thursday the Commissioner agreed with the lawyers (there were 20+ of them on the call) that the ICBL could be lifted except for several properties along Fairview between Brant and Drury Lane.

Some of the most valuable land in the city with some of the loosest zoning as well.

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Reshaping Aldershot: A Preliminary Vision for the Aldershot GO Major Transit Station Area

By Staff

October 18th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We start with the city of Burlington within which there is the village of Aldershot, within which there is now Aldershot Corners.  The Corners has five precincts.

There is a Preliminary Vision for the Aldershot GO Major Transit Station Area, and Aldershot Corners – a community within a village.

Located minutes from Hamilton at the western edge of Burlington, Aldershot Corners is a visitor’s first impression of Burlington when travelling east from Hamilton and Niagara on the Lakeshore West GO line.

The area is nestled within the Aldershot Village Business Improvement Area and focused at the corners of Plains Road, Waterdown Road and Cooke Boulevard. Part of the Treaty 3 lands, Indigenous People were stewards of the land for thousands of years before settlers arrived. Post-Colonially, this area was a major hub for brick manufacturing, and also has a rich agricultural past rooted in fruit production.

Aldershot Corners will continue to evolve as an urban area with a distinct sense of neighbourhood character, supported by a mix of residential, commercial and employment uses.

The colour coding sets out the precincts – detail elsewhere in this article explains what is planned for each of the precincts.

Taller buildings will be concentrated along the rail line and will decrease in height and intensity closer to Plains Road and the existing residential neighborhoods.

Aldershot Corners will be a vibrant, livable community with urban shopping and dining opportunities serving those living and working close by.

New multi-modal urban streets and active transportation facilities will better connect the existing community, providing enhanced mobility and improved access to the GO Station, leisure and recreation opportunities in urban parks and open spaces, as well the many other amenities Aldershot already offers.

The planners created a number of precincts, which are boundaries within which specified levels of development are permitted.

There are five within the Aldershot Corners part of the Aldershot part of the city.

Mid Rise Residential.

Compact residential communities, with a variety of low-rise and mid-rise building forms up to 11 storeys closer to main streets. This Precinct will provide housing forms at a lower scale and intensity including family oriented and ground oriented housing to support the creation of a wide range of housing options, including affordable housing.

Opportunities for commercial activities at street level on strategic streets may be permitted.  Policies will guide appropriate transitions from low rise residential development to more intensive mixed uses. Policies will guide appropriate transitions from the maximum height (11 storeys) to adjacent low-rise neighbourhood, which may include angular planes, setbacks and/or stepbacks.

 

Aldershot Main Street

This Precinct will advance the Plains Road Village Vision and establish a unique community destination with a focus on a continuous retail frontage and main-street pedestrian experience along the frequent transit corridors (Waterdown Road and Plains Road E.) Policies will introduce a requirement for buildings to have a “lower building” design to create a pedestrian scaled environment at the street level.  Policies will guide appropriate transition from the 11 storey maximum height to existing low-rise neighbourhoods, which may include angular planes, setbacks and/or stepbacks.  Precinct lands that are adjacent to existing low rise neighbourhoods, will have a maximum height of 6 storeys. To ensure functional retail and commercial spaces are created, a wide range of approaches will be considered, including but not limited to establishing minimum floor height for the ground floor of buildings, and considering a minimum retail unit size.  Opportunities for affordable housing will be considered in the Aldershot Main Precinct.

Cooke Commons

Serves as a unique retail and dining destination creating a comfortable and vibrant pedestrian environment with active uses at the street level and increased emphasis on pedestrian and multi-modal movement.  A flexible street is being considered to provide opportunity for a community gathering space and potential to close for special events.

Mixed-use buildings throughout the Precinct contribute towards the creation of lively, vibrant and people-oriented places.  Along the west side of the street, heights range up to 19 storeys maximum adjacent to the GO Central Precinct and up to 11 storeys maximum generally along Cooke Boulevard. On the east side, there will be up to 11 storeys maximum generally along Cooke Boulevard which gradually steps down to 6 storeys with appropriate transitions, which may include angular planes, setbacks and/or stepbacks, to the adjacent low-rise residential  neighbourhood.  Policies will introduce a requirement for buildings to include a “lower building” design to create a pedestrian scaled environment at the street level.  Direction to support the function of these areas to accommodate  loading and services and support a wide range of retail use will be investigated and imbedded in policy.

Opportunities for affordable housing will be considered in the Cooke Commons Precinct.

 

Emery Commons

This precinct will accommodate a concentration of residential, retail, employment and commercial uses.

Opportunity exists for a higher concentration of high density residential due to its proximity to an existing public park, a potential new major public park and the GO Central precinct.  Mixed-use buildings, of varying heights to a maximum of 19 storeys, contribute towards the creation of lively, vibrant and people-oriented places.  Opportunities for affordable housing will be considered in the Emery Commons Precinct.

 

Aldershot GO Central

The preeminent destination for Major Office, affordable housing and urban format retail in this MTSA focusing the tallest buildings (maximum 30 stories) close to the GO station.  Where Aldershot GO Central abuts Waterdown Road and Masonry Court policies will require pedestrian orientation development, including an emphasis enhanced public realm and enhanced spaces for waiting for transit. There is particular emphasis on the need to design a functional, safe and accessible transit plaza.  Polices will ensure that the MTSA will accommodate a proportional mix of residential and employment opportunities and ensure that the Aldershot GO Central precinct will be planned to accommodate major office employment.

This map provides additional detail on what is planned for the different parts of what is being called Aldershot Corners.

What is it that is driving these changes?

KEY CHANGES – A number of things have changed since the Draft Precinct Plans were presented to the public and Burlington City Council in 2018.   The following highlights the key changes that have been made or are being considered and the drivers for these changes.

Aldershot GO MTSA –

MTSA Designation and Boundary – Identified in Provincial Policy, the Regional Official Plan must first delineate and assign density targets to Major Transit Station Areas.  Regional Official Plan Amendment (ROPA) 48 delineated the boundary for the Aldershot GO MTSA which identified the removal of existing parks (Hidden Valley Park, Grove Park and Aldershot Park), areas north of the rail line, and established neighbourhoods from the 2018 Aldershot GO Mobility Hub boundary.

Employment – Regional direction through Regional Official Plan Amendment 48 is to include employment within MTSAs.  While Aldershot GO MTSA does not have an employment only precinct, Major Office employment type uses will be required in the Aldershot GO Precinct and it will be outlined through policy.  Other employment types, such as retail, institutional and personal services is broadly encouraged throughout a number of the mixed-use precincts. Specific targets for Major Office will be established.

Comments made by the developer suggested there would be some retail – a Starbucks Coffee shop – but no mention of a supermarket – something the ward Councillor is anxious to see.

Retail – The Aldershot MTSA will provide two unique pedestrian focused retail experiences.  The Aldershot Main Street Precinct provides ground floor retail with a main-street pedestrian experience.  Policies will be considered for ground floor heights and minimum retail unit sizes to ensure functional spaces are provided. The Cooke Commons Precinct will serve as a unique retail and dining destination leading to the GO Station, with a focus on creating a comfortable and vibrant pedestrian environment with active uses at the street level and increased emphasis on pedestrian and multi-modal movement.  In addition to those unique areas the opportunity to require, or in some cases encourage retail in every other precinct to support the day to day needs of existing and future residents.

The only decent park is LaSalle Park; a 15 minute hike that will be stressed once all the residential development is completed. Great park with splash pads and a wading pool. Upgrades will be needed at some point.

Public Parks and Linear Parks – As noted in the Provincial Policy Statement publicly accessible built and natural settings including parklands are important ways to promote healthy, active communities.  Potential locations for parks are identified with a green tree symbol.  The City is considering other opportunities for wider corridors along streets to act as linear parks to provide valuable open space/park space and facilitate connections.  A linear park along Masonry Court connecting Hidden Valley Park with Grove Park will connect residents, employees and visitors to existing green spaces. A new linear park extending along Cooke Boulevard from Plains Road East to new development north of Masonry Court will focus on providing opportunities to linger and to support safe, comfortable pedestrian access to the station.  Enhanced connections, linear parks, new parks and other connections are required throughout the MTSA in order to facilitate safe and more direct pedestrian and active transportation routes to and from the GO station.

Public Service – As noted in the Provincial Policy Statement, public services such as healthcare, education, emergency and protective services, cultural activities and civic administration are necessary to sustain healthy, liveable and safe communities.  Key precincts will provide community spaces, alongside new residential and retail development in key locations. In addition to that new focus in key precincts the “PS” icon remains in key locations where the consideration of the incorporation of public service facilities is critical.  Public services will be located strategically throughout the MTSA and policies will be developed to ensure that these services are located strategically to support population and employment growth in coordination will be coordinated with future development.

Integrated Mobility – In 2019, the City launched its Integrated Mobility Plan (IMP). This plan establishes a vision of safe, accessible, sustainable, balanced and livable mobility for the City of Burlington.  The goals of this plan represent a shift from a focus on cars to more choice in transportation options; with a target of 20+% of trips in urban areas to shift towards transportation choices other than personal vehicles. A Transportation Assessment is being undertaken to identify the local street network for each MTSA (see technical studies below) which will integrate the vision and goals of the city-wide IMP.

Newly built part of Station West – not much in the way of a complete street or parkland for that matter.

Complete Streets (formerly referred to as Green Streets in the 2018 Draft Precinct Plans) – The City’s new Official Plan identifies the need for complete streets strategy for all future street and road projects (new construction, reconstruction, resurfacing and rehabilitation). The OP also states that MTSA primary and secondary connectors (Plains Road East and Waterdown Road) shall be complete streets.  With a long-term view, the City is proposing that all existing and proposed streets in the MTSA allow for inclusion of some complete street elements over time which could include space for pedestrians, cyclists, transit, and streetscaping in addition to travel lanes for cars.

Active Transportation – The City is committed to implementing active transportation corridors to improve connections and transportation choice.  Planned active transportation corridors have been updated to be consistent with the 2021 Cycling Master Plan and the 2015 Community Trails Strategy.  Active transportation corridors and connections proposed through consultation are also shown in the MTSA.

Climate Change & Sustainability – The City’s Climate Action Plan establishes a net carbon neutral goal by 2050 for community emissions.  Work continues to identify ways for the City of Burlington to address the impacts of climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  In addition to the transit and active transportation focus of the Aldershot GO MTSA consideration will be given to other ways future development of this MTSA could address climate change including encourage building energy efficiency, urban design policies to address heat and tree cover, and opportunities to consider district energy.

Public Art at the intersection of Waterdown and Plains Road

Frequent Transit Corridors – Plains Road E. and Waterdown Road are identified as Frequent Transit Corridors in the City’s new Official Plan.  Pedestrian-oriented development is desired along these corridors to support the frequent transit service.  Policies will be identified to encourage pedestrian-oriented development along these corridors including consideration of lower heights at street level, urban design and public realm requirements.  Urban design and public realm can also improve the experience for those waiting for transit along these corridors.

Technical Studies Underway – The following technical studies are currently being undertaken and may result in the need for further revision of the Precincts.

  • Land Use Compatibility – There are some major facilities in and around the Aldershot MTSA which may require separation from sensitive land uses like residences, day care centres and education and health facilities. Work is being completed to confirm the potential for land use compatibility issues within the MTSA and to develop a framework for technical assessments to be completed as part of future development proposals.  This work may result in changes to the precincts or area specific policies in the Plan to guide land use change and minimize the potential for land use compatibility issues over time.
  • Transportation Assessment – The current Aldershot GO MTSA shows the planned South Service Road and Masonry Court as shown in the new Official Plan as well as the proposed new streets included in the 2018 Mobility Hub. Traffic congestion has been regularly raised as a concern by the public and a transportation assessment is being undertaken to determine the potential impact of adding the new people and jobs to this area.  In keeping with the vision of the IMP, it is anticipated that the Transportation Assessment results will focus on non-auto infrastructure and ways to shift people to other transportation choices. One of the key outcomes of the Transportation Assessment will be to confirm the need and location for any new local streets to support safe, efficient movement throughout the area.
  • Inclusionary Zoning – As part of the City’s Housing Strategy, an assessment of options to implement Inclusionary Zoning (IZ) is being undertaken. IZ is a tool to integrate affordable housing into future development.  IZ can only be applied to MTSAs identified as protected by the Province and Regional Official Plan Amendment 48 which requires the City to establish affordable housing targets for its Major Transit Station Areas. Should IZ be recommended for Aldershot GO, there will be a need for the appropriate guidance on how the tool will be applied.
  • Environmental & Hazard Lands –Studies are underway to identify areas that may be prone to flooding. Completed Flood studies for Aldershot are currently being reviewed by Conservation Halton. Identified areas may need to be protected through policies within some of the Aldershot GO MTSA Precincts.  A Provincially Significant Wetland has been identified to the northeast of the MTSA and any potential policy requirements are being assessed through updates to an Environmental Impact Study being undertaken as part of the background technical work.

Heights and Transition – The maximum heights in the Aldershot GO Precincts generally remain as presented in 2018.  There have been some minor changes including changing lands just east of Cooke Boulevard from Emery/Cooke Commons Precinct with a maximum height of 19 storeys to a new Cooke Common Precinct with a maximum height of 11 storeys.  Policies will be included to guide transition from the maximum height, typically closer to the main streets, to lower rise buildings adjacent to existing low-rise neighbourhoods.

There will be an in depth look at the Plans for the Burlington GO station area on October 19th and a similar event for the area around the Appleby GO station on October 26th.  On November 4th there will be a review of the plans for all three MTSA’s.

All will be virtual events.

There is a WORKBOOK for those who want to pass their views and opinions along to the planners.  The link to the WORKBOOK is HERE

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Planning the new Aldershot - time for public input - there is a workbook to help

By Staff

October 18th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington has embarked on a huge city building project.

When completed the city will have three distinct neighbourhoods; the eastern part of the city will have a new neighbourhood centered on the Aldershot GO station.

This is the western boundary of the Station West Development built by the ADI Group.

A significant part of the community building has already taken place in Aldershot.  The Station West development by the Adi Group is well underway with three more towers to be built on the south west corner of the property that edges onto Masonry Road.

The other two new neighbourhoods will be centered on the Burlington and Appleby GO stations.

The city Planning Department is now working to get feedback from the people who will be impacted by these very significant changes.

A public meeting was held to explain what is planned.  To get feedback from the public the Planners have devised a WORKBOOK that they say will take 30 to 45 minutes to complete.

Completing the WORKBOOK is voluntary and the information people provide is confidential (even to city staff).

The Planners recommend you complete the workbook on a laptop, tablet or PC to view the images in a larger format and keep a copy of the Preliminary Preferred Precinct Plan open in another tab or browser window to assist you in answering the questions and as a point of reference.

The link to the WORKBOOK is HERE.  It is a little complicated.  Just scroll through the pages, click on the images and then return to the page.  There is enough instruction to get you through it.

The workbook is available in other languages. To request, e-mail getinvolved@burlington.ca.  You may also use the “Select Language” translate button found on the project page to translate both the page and workbook.

An MTSA (Major Transit Service Area) is the area within 500 to 800-metres of a higher order transit station (these are the three GO stations) that are expected to be about a 10-minute walk from the GO station.

These are seen as the three most critical locations within the urban area expected to accommodate the majority of the City’s forecasted growth to 2031 and beyond.

Through the preparation of the new Official Plan, new policies were developed to guide development and change in the Downtown and Uptown (at Appleby Line and Upper Middle Road). The MTSAs are now the remaining priority locations for which detailed planning must be completed to establish the vision for growth, to guide development, investments in transit, infrastructure and public service facilities, including parks, and to support significant future population and employment growth.

To some this project may feel familiar.  From 2017 to 2019 the City worked on developing area-specific plans (ASPs) for the three GO Station areas, then called the Mobility Hubs Study.  The MTSA ASP project will build upon, and advance, the work done through the Mobility Hubs Study.

The objective of this project is to plan to accommodate new residents and jobs by setting a vision for three unique, complete communities that are centered around the City’s three GO Stations along the Lakeshore West rail line.  These communities will be environmentally friendly, infrastructure-efficient, walkable, bikeable, and will support local and regional transit with a diverse mix of employment, housing, recreation, and shopping features.

What have we heard so far?

Engagement was a key element of the previous Mobility Hub Study work. From the feedback received through 2017 and 2018, a number of key themes emerged to provide guidance in planning for these areas:

Increase, Improve and Support…

Public spaces by supporting existing and new open spaces, parks and other community spaces that are safe, usable, inclusive and interactive, and incorporate public art, landscape features etc. to enhance placemaking.

Community amenities by encouraging an increased scale and mix of commercial/retail uses at grade, including grocery stores, coffee shops, community and recreational space etc.

Mobility by designing a well-connected, safe and accessible public realm with active animated streets and robust cycling and pedestrian networks, focused on direct connections to and from GO Stations.

Housing options by planning for a diverse range of different and affordable housing choices to cater to all ages and abilities.

Private Spaces by encouraging sustainable design and variety of architectural styles to create distinct buildings and enhance neighbourhood character, and by reinforcing midrise corridors.

Public engagement by providing residents with enough time to engage and increase resident engagement and clearly explaining the required growth targets for Burlington.

Parkland by planning for park and public spaces that consider the needs of the entire area including developing fair approaches to meet that objective.

Traffic congestion by supporting the public transportation network and investing in additional facilities for walking and cycling.

Solid Gold site as it exists today.

Building height and transition concerns by clearly explaining planning rationale for where height is being located, ensuring and explaining how height will be regulated, and by reducing losses of sunlight and privacy through appropriate building height transitions.

Speaking of height limitations – this rendering represents what the owners of Solid Gold want to build on a site that currently has a single story structure.

Protect…

Established residential neighbourhoods by ensuring built form, height and transition support and respect existing character, and providing clear policies for heritage protection.

The planners learned that:

Beyond the broad themes highlighted above, a number of key themes specific to the Aldershot GO MTSA also emerged, including the consideration of:

– opportunities for new bike paths, including through Aldershot Park;

– opportunities for amenities to support residents and employees;

– opportunities for complete streets, including Cooke Boulevard;

– ways to manage the impacts of increased traffic along Plains Road;

– opportunities to incorporate mid-rise development along Plains Road and Waterdown Road; and

– excluding the low-density residential properties located on Clearview Avenue and a portion of St. Matthew’s Avenue.

 

A little more detail on what might go where

Now the planners need your feedback. The input you provide may inform:

– Refinements to the vision (i.e. land uses, building heights, urban design considerations etc.);

– Precinct changes (i.e. policy directions, boundaries, built form directions, etc.);

– The preparation of the area-specific plans or the development of policy.

There are more specific details about all of the work that has informed the preliminary preferred precinct plan, including technical studies, can be found at getinvolvedburlington.ca/mtsa.

 

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Edward VII Fountain now complete - globe is in place

By Staff

October 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The people on the Burlington Historical Society take the work they do very seriously.  They collaborate with the Heritage Advisory Committee on which they have two members.

Most of the recommendations that come out of the Advisory Committee are small in nature.  The setting up of a plaque, recommending grants or loans that upgrade heritage homes and do something to ensure that they are kept in good condition.

The Edward VII Fountain is one of the city’s oldest pieces of the city’s Heritage. It has been around for more than 100 years.

Recently the Advisory Committee took on the task of rehabilitating what has been known as the King Edward VII Fountain.

It’s not a particularly attractive item but it is loaded with history.  It has been in place, at various locations in the city, for more than 100 years.

The Heritage people are sticklers about detail – they take the view that if they are going to do something they want to do it right.

Alan Harrington who, along with other members of the Heritage Committee, shepherded the refurbishment of the Fountain explains that the “sorry old unit was hauled away from the corner of City Hall on the May 24 2021 weekend for some much needed repairs.

“Repairs needed because this Hamilton-made cast iron unit has sat on Brant Street for over a century of Burlington’s weather.

“Its last tune up was for the Queen’s Jubilee in 1977.

“About a month ago – we reported the fountain was refurbished and reinstalled back to its rightful spot.

“It looked good…. – however there was one part missing.. the glass globe on top?

“Apparently some part was back ordered in the supply chain?

“Not to worry – that part arrived last week and the globe was installed and plugged in.

“The globe now shines at night with a pearly luminescence – perfect for its location near the Cenotaph.

“Not sure – but we think the last time the globe may have been lit – was by natural gas before World War I ?

“Big thanks to the City Crew for their excellent work – and adding the crowning glory.”

Crowning Glory might be a stretch – but with repairs and a fresh coat of paint it is a handsome addition to what will soon be known as Veteran Square.

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Art Gallery has a lively program - despite the pandemic - and Zoom works quite well

By Staff

October 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Despite pandemic limitations life goes on – and the Art Gallery has managed to keep up with a flow of information and opportunities to be involved.

There is an interesting series of Zoom events – one that takes a deeper look at the work of an artist at the Gallery

The next Step into the Studio virtual event series takes place on October 26th at 10:30; a virtual visit to the lively studio of ceramic artist Wayne Cardinalli.

Register HERE for that event.

The Gallery is open to the public.  One recent visitor explained her visit experience this way:

“I came to visit on an early Saturday afternoon and had the place practically to myself. It was very peaceful and relaxing to wander through the building viewing the various exhibits of artworks. They also have a small conservatory (where you can even purchase small plants!) which I was not anticipating whatsoever. I found I spent a good chunk of my visit amongst the flora.

“Definitely recommend if you need a small (not to mention free!) time filler and are in the area.”

There are two Workshops you might want to look into

Microbial Sculpture
October 23 | 1 PM
Online, via Zoom
Register Now

 

 

 

 

 

alt-text as poetry
October 25 | 6 PM
Online, via Zoom
Register Now

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The real story behind the title 'Queen Elizabeth II' - relates to a train going through Burlington

By Pepper Parr

October 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Alan Harrington is an accountant, sometimes called a number cruncher, which isn’t really accurate either.

Harrington has a thing about dates, which are numbers.

He revels in dates that don’t mean a thing to most people.

Take last Thursday – for Harrington it was important because 70 years ago on that date Princess Elizabeth was in Burlington.  True!

Take the following with a grain of salt!

“October 1951: HRH Princess Elizabeth and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh arrive in Toronto to ride a ten-car Royal train made up of equipment provided by CN and CP.

“It included two government cars used by Elizabeth’s parents on the 1939 Royal Tour; the train was powered by CN Northern No. 6401.

“It departed Toronto for Niagara Falls early on the morning of October 14 most likely passing through Burlington. “I have vivid memories of my journey across the country in 1951,” she said of the trip.”

“OK she was only a princess at the time – and she was riding westbound at high speed past the station – at about 7:00 am so she probably didn’t even see it through her royal passenger car window.

“If she was looking – she would have seen a Union Jack Flag hanging there for her.

“Less than four months later, upon the death of her father King George VI, the princess became Queen Elizabeth II.

The Princess with her husband Duke of Edinburgh – were they stopped in Burlington?

“But “that second” at the Station must have been so dear to her – that even to this day – she still calls herself Queen Elizabeth “the Second”

The above was a “humorous” email to the members of the Freeman Station. The G&M newspaper is obviously photo shopped.

It is true the princess was in town on that day and many people showed up to see the train – but it sped past without slowing and all the curtains were drawn and people left disappointed.

That original Union Jack flag from the Station is STILL around and currently on display in the Fort Macleod museum in Alberta !!

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Mayor shows it can be done - people can meet in a live, real people in the room situation - she just doesn't want to do it for you

By Pepper Parr

October 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There they were.  Three Mayors: ours, the Mayor from Barrie and the Mayor from Mississauga.

Talking to the media and voicing their complaints.

No masks, sitting at what looked like a safe Covid19 social distance, not much different than the way they would sit in a non-pandemic environment.

The complaints about the province were the same – the only thing different was that we currently have a Premier who now knows he can do whatever he wants – and has a court decision to back him up.

Cutting the size of a city council down to about half of what it was “during” an election lets you know that Doug Ford isn’t going to listen all that closely to complaints from municipal politicians.

Mayor Meed Ward had a venue to die for; the set up at the Pearle Hotel and Spa was something to experience.  Being the politician she is Meed Ward would make the best of it all.

What most people don’t understand is – why can the Mayor hold an event and talk to the media the way she would in normal times but people in Burlington cannot delegate to their council in a similar live setting.

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward – doesn’t appear to be prepared to meet her constituents in conditions that allow for real engagement.

Basically because she can.  She has said on any number of occasions that holding council meetings in a virtual setting works for her and it appears to work for a majority of city council.

It is less than a pleasant experience for those delegating virtually, fumbling their way through the technology that works – sort of.

The human interaction is missing.  The buzz that exists in a room when people can talk to each other and exchange opinions; support each other as they ask questions.

Gary Scobie with his eyes focused on members of Council as he delegates to the elected. Democracy right in front of your eyes

Jim Young reminding council that the power they have was given to them by the people who elected them.

Much is lost when people like Gary Scobie, Jim Young or Tom Muir arrive at the podium putting fact after fact on the table.  This city misses the likes of Vanessa xxx standing at the podium and setting the record straight.

It is time for Burlington’s city council to put at least put a toe in the water and begin to loosen its pandemic bonds.

Related news story:

Mayor takes off the masks and meets with media with looser social contact rules

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Police in Burlington Make 3 Arrests and Seize Shotgun and other Weapons

By Staff

October 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Investigators with the Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) Street Crime Unit in Burlington have made three arrests and seized multiple weapons including a shotgun.

Several of those weapons could do some very serious damage.

On October 13, 2021, officers executed a search warrant at a residence near downtown Burlington. As a result of this search, the following items have been seized (see attached photo):

  • 1 12 Gauge Shotgun
  • 24 shotgun shells and 1 small calibre pistol round
  • 1 machete
  • 1 hatchet
  • 1 flick knife
  • 5 grams of methamphetamine
  • Drug trafficking paraphernalia (scales, phones, packaging)
  • $890.00 Canadian currency
  • 1 stolen licence plate
  • 1 motorcycle

Police have also made three arrests in connection with this drug investigation.

A 40 year old male from Burlington has been arrested and charged with:

  • Unauthorized Possession of a Firearm
  • Tampering with a Serial Number of Firearm
  • Knowledge of Unauthorized Possession of Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of a Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of Ammunition
  • Possession of Property Obtained by Crime (x2)
  • Possession of a Weapon for a Dangerous Purpose (x4)
  • Possession of a Prohibited Weapon
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance: Methamphetamine (x2)
  • Breach Firearm Prohibition Order (x2)

A 38 year old female of Burlington has been arrested and charged with:

  • Unauthorized Possession of a Firearm
  • Tampering with a Serial Number of Firearm
  • Knowledge of Unauthorized Possession of Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of a Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of Ammunition
  • Possession of Property Obtained by Crime
  • Possession of a Weapon for a Dangerous Purpose (x4)
  • Possession of a Prohibited Weapon
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance: Methamphetamine

A 33 year old male of Burlington has been arrested and charged with:

  • Unauthorized Possession of a Firearm
  • Tampering with a Serial Number of Firearm
  • Knowledge of Unauthorized Possession of Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of a Firearm
  • Careless Use/ Storage of Ammunition
  • Possession of Property Obtained by Crime
  • Possession of a Weapon for a Dangerous Purpose (x2)
  • Fail to comply – Being on an Undertaking Form

All three accused were held in custody pending a bail hearing on October 14, 2021.

Names of the arrested were not released by police – unusual

Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to contact Detective Scott Heyerman of the 3 District Street Crime Unit at 905-825-4777 ext. 2342.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers. “See something? Hear something? Know something? Contact Crime Stoppers” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.

 

 

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Mayor hosts Mayors from 29 big cities - shows them what we have going for us

By Ryan O’Dowd: Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

October 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Ontario’s Big City Mayor(OBCM) caucus met in Burlington for the first time since the pandemic began yesterday. The housing crisis, municipal finances, COVID-19, and what the OBCM will ask of provincial candidates this election featured on the agenda. Rocked by the pandemic the OBCM issued a stern call to action for long-term stable funding for municipalities from the federal and provincial governments.

Burlington Mayor Marianne Meed Ward with Barrie Mayor Jeff Lehman and Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie.

Barrie Mayor Jeff Lehman, Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie, and Guelph Mayor Cam Guthrie joined Burlington Mayor Marianne Meed Ward to speak to the media about the meeting’s content.

The OBCM presented a united front on the lifting of pandemic restrictions, agreeing decisions on this matter should be made uniformly across the province citing citizen movement between regions under different levels of lockdown as a primary concern. They reiterated that lifting restrictions must be based on science rather than political pressure.

Mayor Guthrie wanted to see more action from the federal and provincial government to assist municipalities through pandemic recovery, accusing them of finger-pointing responsibility to each other. Guthrie pointed out the municipal government is the only sector of government legally not allowed to run a deficit. Guthrie felt municipalities have had to ask the government for assistance too often without action.

“Municipalities are ready, we already know what our impacts are from the pandemic, and we know what we need. So we ask respectfully the provincial and federal government to put the fingerprinting away and get to work on trying to help to make sure municipalities are made full, especially when it comes to the impacts financially, the deficits that we’re all facing. We thought we would only have those deficits within the 2020 year and here we are in the 2021 year.

“Our budgets are staring us in the face the next couple of months,” said Guthrie.

Mayor Crombie brought up a request for a new model of funding for municipalities, saying “we’re still asked to build 21st-century cities with 19th-century tools.” She pointed to municipalities as the only sector of government that had to lay off staff as among the reasons long term sustainable funding is required. The OBCM members in attendance voiced their support for this request, a request Mayor Guthrie said has been discussed for some time.

Facing public transit ridership slashed by over 50% Mayor Lehman lamented the difficult decisions facing municipalities under the current funding model in deciding what services to cut.

“Ridership numbers are a big gap from where we were two years ago, and that’s going to require some changes to be made faster and that’s the kind of support that we will need now, it’s less about emergency funding week by week now it’s about how we recover strong; that will be addressing deficits that make cities make critical choices in terms of cutting services,” said Lehman.

Mayor Meed Ward put the figures of the municipal deficit strain in sobering terms for Burlington residents.

“In Burlington, the combination of lost revenues and added expenses for us is close to $5 million. If we had to make that up just through taxes, that is close to a quarter percent tax increase before we do anything else that is just to dig ourselves out of a hole. So when we look at all the other needs that we have in the community and inflationary pressures, we would be looking at outrageously high taxes – close to 10, or 15%, if we had to make it ourselves and clearly that it’s not palatable or acceptable or sustainable for anyone,” said Meed Ward.

Ontario’s Big City Mayor caucus features mayors of Ontario’s 29 cities with a population over 100,000 which means they represent nearly 80 percent of the province’s population.

Housing crisis considerations were discussed ranging from homelessness to the middle class, with what was labeled an increasingly clear gap between supply and demand in Southern Ontario. Rental costs were included in the discussion, where Burlington ranks the fifth most expensive city in Canada to rent, one-bedroom apartments averaging over $1800, as per the latest available data from realtor.com. The kind of policy-based action used to combat the housing crisis will grow clearer with requests put to provincial candidates this upcoming election.

Few municipalities have the breath taking views.

Discussions were had about bail reform and addressing what OBCM called the catch and release policy which has seen repeat offenders commit violent acts. It was a topic brought up in the meeting by former provincial leader of the opposition Mayor Patrick Brown, who did not appear for media availability, the present members voiced support for change.

The meeting was hosted at the new Pearle Hotel and Spa, an impressive venue at the waterfront.

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Art Gallery Soup Bowl fund raiser underway.

By Staff

October 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

They have been doing it for years and weren’t about to let a pandemic get in the way.

The Annual Soup Bowl event is now underway.

Participation is easy: 1. Chose a Bowl, 2. Plan Your Pick-up, 3. Enjoy your soup! Bowl sales have BEGUN and the event runs from November 8th-30th.

The event is a favourite fundraiser – social distance style! One-of-a-kind bowls are fresh out of the kiln waiting to be filled with locally produced soups.

Five of the restaurants taking part are located in the Downtown Core.

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

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Is the province about to end the State of Emergency it put the municipal world into?

By Pepper Parr

October 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

From a source that has been reliable in the past there is word that the current Emergency State put in place across the province that has the day to day operation of the city in the hands of the administration

All the municipalities have been in that state since March 17th, 2019, less than a month later Mayor Meed Ward declared a State of Emergency for the city.

Municipalities created Emergency Coordinating Groups that meet regularly and can meet in minutes if they have to should there be an emergency.

The City Manager keeps the Mayor up to date and the Mayor takes part in meetings but is not believed to be a member of the ECG.

The Mayor does have one on one meetings with the City Manager on a regular basis.

From the left: City Manager, Tim Commisso; Treasurer Joan Ford and Executive Director Sheila Jones kept it all together as the city weathered a pandemic.

At least once a month, usually during the week Standing Committee meetings take place, Sheila Jones, one of the Executive Directors, takes Council through everything the city staff plan to do or change in the way city services are delivered.

There is also an update on where things stand financially as well as updates on anything that pertains to the administrative functioning of the city.

With an ECG handling changes in the way services are delivered municipalities had access to funds which city manager Tim Commisso at the time said was a good position to be in.

The city’s financial picture has benefited significantly as the result of the tens of millions that have flowed from the province to the city.

It is not clear at this time if the city will revise the way Council meetings are held if the Emergency is lifted. At this point in time they are all virtual – the sentiment apparently being that members of Council like it that way, see it as an alternate version of real engagement.

Kudos to Kearns for holding ward meetings that were both live and virtual.

Ward 2 Council member Lisa Kearns has been holding ward meetings that are both live and virtual. Kudos to her for breaking the barrier that most members of council are quite happy to keep in place.

The Mayor has said that she prefers the “virtual approach” – the city “gets more work from me when I can work from home”. We also get to hear the dog yelping.

A benefit that might not be recognized or appreciated right away is just how well many senior staff members have performed.  Executive Director Sheila Jones has come into her own; rallying the troops and delivering all kinds of support and positive feed back every chance she gets.

City treasurer Joan Ford, always reliable – proved to be a rock that both Jones and the City Manager Tim Commisso could rely on.

There were a couple of staff members who, Amber Rushton in particular, who served the city manager in a way that certainly impressed him.

Related news article:

Province declares State of Emergency March 17, 2019

Mayor declares State of Emergency

City Manager gets close to a blank cheque

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Walmart applicants (they want to hire 154 people in Burlington) can simply walk into their local store, apply and be interviewed on the spot.

By pepper Parr

October 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

All those people who don’t want to return to the hospitality sector might want to give Walmart a look.

Walmart Canada is looking to hire 12,000 permanent associates at the special National Hiring Event on Oct. 14 and 15 from 1pm to 8pm local time in Burlington stores where they want to fill a total of 160 positions.

During the special National Hiring Days, interested applicants can simply walk into their local store, apply and be interviewed on the spot. New associates are needed primarily for the following roles:

Omnichannel Customer Experience Sales floor Store Associates
• Fresh Food Store Associates
• Merchandising Store Associates
• Warehouse Associates
• Drivers

Walmart offers many benefits for employees including training programs and the potential for upward momentum, as well as many perks to help employees save money and live better.

Part-time associates have access to benefits and the opportunity to receive a year-end bonus, a tuition reimbursement program, customized training, and education opportunities. Walmart has also recently announced enhanced paternity leave benefits, which are also available to part-time associates.

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