Fugitive Friday - Week #13 - Looking for Ashley JACOBS and Michael CRICK

Crime 100By Staff

July 17, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It is week thirteen of the Halton Regional Police Service “Fugitive Friday” initiative that reaches out to the public to help locate wanted persons and hold them accountable for their actions. The initiative is being run by the Burlington Offender Management Unit

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

In this edition of Fugitive Fridays the police are searching for another couple, Ashley Ann JACOBS, 30 year, of Kahnawake, Quebec and Michael William CRICK, 31 years, of Hamilton, Ontario.

It is alleged:

FF13 Jacobs

Ashley Jacobs is alleged to have assaulted a person

In October 2013, Ashley JACOBS assaulted a female during an altercation in the City of Burlington, was arrested and released to attend Burlington Court in October 2014. JACOBS failed to appear and a warrant was issued for her arrest.

On two separate occasions in 2014, Michael CRICK attended the Mapleview Mall and the LCBO in the City of Burlington and stole several items. CRICK was arrested and released, scheduled to re-attend Milton court in October of 2014 which he failed to do and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

JACOBS is wanted by the Halton Regional Police Service for:
Assault – Adult female
Breach of Probation Order
Fail to Comply Undertaking
Fail to Attend Court

FF13  Crick

Michael Crick

CRICK is wanted by the Halton Regional Police Service for:
Theft Under $5000 x 2
Fail to Re-Attend Court
Fail to Comply with Probation
CRICK is also wanted by Hamilton Police Service for:
Fail to Comply Probation

Ashley JACOBS is described as 5’9”, 190 lbs with brown eyes and black hair. JACOBS has pierced ears and a tattoo on the back of her neck of an “Anarchy” symbol.

CRICK is described as 5’10”, 150 lbs with brown hair and eyes. CRICK has scars on his head and left thumb and also has tattoos “Delaware” on his left forearm and “Crook” on his right forearm.

Both parties are known to frequent Halton, Hamilton, Brantford and Six Nations. Ashley has strong ties to Kahnawake, Quebec and may be staying there.

Anyone with information on their whereabouts is asked to contact D/Cst Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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After a sloppy and messy debate council refers the Code of Conduct to the city manager; new provincial offense court house also given the go.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

July 16, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

This article has been revised.

They are now off for six weeks – except for a three day municipal conference in August the magnificent seven that lead this city of ours will be taking it easy.

During their last city council they came close to making absolute fools of themselves over a code of conduct that we doubt will be followed – and if it is – it will be used to continue the petty games we saw at the Wednesday night council meeting.

After what the Mayor called a “sloppy, messy” debate council put back in a section of the Code that had been taken out at a meeting May 12th.
There was all kinds of fulminating about principles and professionalism and the need to work as a team which isn’t what your Council did Wednesday evening.

After some discussion between Councillors Craven and Sharman in the foyer outside the Council Chamber, Councillor Sharman returned to his seat, said a few words to Councillor Lancaster and the meeting began.

Councillors Sharman and Lancaster: both part of the Shape Burlington committee who seem to have forgotten what the report was all about - civic engagement

Councillor Sharman tends to advise Councillor Lancaster on issues and directions.

Councillor Lancaster introduced a motion, seconded by Councillor Sharman to replace wording in the Code of Conduct that had been taken out at that May 12th meeting.

No one had seen the motion until it was introduced – not the Clerk or the Mayor. All the chatter about professionalism and respect for each other got blown out the window.

There is precious little respect between Councillors Craven and Sharman for Councillor Meed Ward. Councillor Lancaster tends to go along with whatever Sharman suggests.

The issue was about whether or not a council members can involve themselves in matters that are outside their wards.

The Gazette will report on that part of the meeting in another piece.

The final vote was to refer the revised Code of Conduct to the city manager where it will get debated under the Governance section of the strategic Plan. One of the problems is that Strategic Plan meetings are for the most part not recorded or broadcast on the city’s web site.

 

wev

They now have a Code of Conduct – will it make any difference as to how they behave with one another? Don’t expect any changes – the behaviour for most of these men and women is deeply rooted.

The Gazette will report on that part of the meeting in another piece.

Council goes into Closed Session to hear what city solicitor has to say.

Council went into a closed session to talk with the city solicitor about the latest move on the part of the ADI Development Group and the 28 storey project they want to build at Martha and Lakeshore Road. We have no idea what they talked about but the length of the closed session suggests that it was complex.

Earlier in the week the Ontario Municipal Board Commissioner who will be hearing the ADI application set a date for in March for the hearing.

The OMB meeting on Monday was, we are advised, a meeting to set out what the issues are and to narrow the focus – to determine just what it is ADI is asking the OMB to do.

ADI project - rendering from LAkeshore

It is going to take some really fine lawyering to prevent this 28 storey structure from going up at the corner of Martha and Lakeshore. OMB hearing expected to take place in March of 2016

The Gazette was not able to attend that meeting but our colleague Joan Little, a former city and regional Councillor and a columnist for the Hamilton Spectator, said she didn’t hear any discussion that had to do with the narrowing of the issues.

These preliminary meetings are held to get some sense as to how much time the Municipal Board should allocate for the hearing. The one looks like it is going to be long and contentious.

ADI has hired Weir & Foulds, a Toronto firm with an exceptionally strong pedigree – these guys don’t take any prisoners. Based on the two occasions the Gazette listened to one of their lawyer’s the city has its work cut out for it.

New Court House for Provincial Offenses gets the go-ahead.

There was more – the construction of a court house on Palladium Way at Walkers Line is now a go. The intention is to have a court house built that will hear Provincial Offenses only.

Burlington Court House

At least two more years for this Provincial Offenses Court House.

Citizens in the Alton Community were concerned with people being tried for criminal offenses being in the area. Provincial Offenses are things like Highway Traffic Act cases; charges laid against people who have been charged with a provincial law offense.  They aren’t going to see men and woman in handcuffs and shackles being led into that court house.

While the province is responsible for running the courts in which criminal cases are heard – the building that is being planned will not hear that kind of case

Council approved the issuing of a Request for proposals (RFP) to private sector investors/developers inviting them to purchase or lease the site the city owns and build the court house.

Transit issues got a very small mention – there are going to be talks with Oakville transit to look into what might be done to get some public transit to the court house.

City Manager James Ridge did say that there was some public education needed and that there would be public consultations in September.

The Court House to be built is expected to serve the needs of Region foe the next 25 years. The intention is to have the court house ready for occupancy in January of 2018.

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Burlington police would like to talk to a Hamilton resident about automobile break-ins.

Crime 100By Staff

July 10, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

As part of a reaching out to the community for help program the |Halton Regional police are sharing the name and photograph of Marcin SYDOR 37 years old, of Hamilton (Ancaster), ON.

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

Every Friday, the Burlington Offender Management Unit will share information on a wanted person in hopes that the public can assist in locating the individual.

FF12  Sydor

Marcin SYDOR 37 years old, of Hamilton (Ancaster), ON.

In this edition of Fugitive Fridays the 3 District, Burlington Offender Management Unit is searching for Marcin SYDOR 37 years old, of Hamilton (Ancaster), ON.

It is alleged:
– In March of 2011 the accused entered a residential parking lot in the City of Burlington and stole a vehicle then continued to damage and steal from several vehicles that were parked overnight
– The accused stole various items including 4 tires and rims from a car, to GPS units and credit cards that were located inside vehicles
– The accused also broke into and stole items from several storage lockers
— The accused was arrested and attended Milton court on several occasions but failed to appear for court in February, 2012

He is wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

Theft over $5000
Theft under $5000 x 3
Break and Enter with Intent
Mischief under $5000 x 2
Possession of Property Obtained by Crime
Breach of Probation
Fail to Re-Attend Court

The accused is also wanted by Hamilton Police for:

Fraud over $5000
Fraud under $5000 x 7
Breach of Probation
Fail to Comply Recognizance x 2
Breach of Undertaking x 2
Possess – Use of Credit Card x 29

SYDOR is described as 5’8”, 150lbs, hazel eyes and dark brown hair. At the time of his arrest SYDOR had a pierced left ear and a small scar above his right eye. SYDOR was born in Poland and has ties to Burlington, Hamilton and the surrounding areas.

Anyone who may have witnessed this male or has information that would assist investigators in identifying and locating him are encouraged to contact D/C Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Police bring technology to the original Neighborhood Watch concept - SCRAM is a big help.

Crime 100By Staff

July 4, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Kind of tough when you can’t be sure that the things you left in your car while it was parked in the driveway overnight are going to be there when you get in the car the next morning. But that is what it has come to.

Halton Police constantly remind the public to lock their vehicles parked in the driveway and more importantly, to hide and secure valuables such as electronics from sight.

Sure – throw a blanket over the dash board – that will just encourage the thieves to beak the window. In their media release their police said: “Dash mounted GPS devices left in plain view resulted in vehicle windows being smashed to gain entry.”

Car broken into

This is a scene far too many car owners are seeing when they walk out of the house to get into the car they had parked in the driveway.

Overnight, between June 30 and July 1, 2015, several vehicle entries occurred in the Region with Oakville being hit the hardest. Thieves were checking for unlocked car doors looking for cash, GPS devices and other electronics.

The police continue to investigate vehicle entries and ask the public to make extra efforts to keep valuables safe and hidden from sight. If possible, take any valuable electronics into the home at night so not to attract wandering thieves.

Catching these thieves is not always easy – the police usually don’t have much to go on. It was that fact that brought about SCRAM.

Halton Regional Police have a Security Camera Registration and Monitoring program, ( S.C.R.A.M) a community based crime prevention opportunity and investigative tool that enlists the help of Halton residents.

S.C.R.A.M. enables community members to voluntarily identify and register their residential video surveillance equipment through a simple, secure, confidential, online form located on the Halton Regional Police Service website. https://bit.ly/11B4FNE

Surveillance-Cameras - home -  graphic

One camera is usually enough for decent home surveillance.

A number of people wonder just what giving police access to your home security means. You are not giving the police any access when you register – what you are doing in letting the police know that you have an electronic security system. If there is a crime near your home the police will know that you have a security camera and may ask if they can look at what was captured by your camera.

You are under no obligation to hand over anything.

When investigating a crime the police usually end up going door to door hoping that someone may have seen something – if they knew where the security cameras were they could narrow down the search area.

Door to door can be a time-consuming endeavour as it may include a 360 radius around the crime scene. Armed with the knowledge of locations of security cameras, police can better focus their investigation. This has proven helpful in many investigations where suspect vehicles or suspects themselves have been picked up on third-party camera systems. Knowing a “direction” enables investigators to focus their attention on that particular path, even at considerable distances, where perhaps another camera may be located.

Investigators have been surprised by the number of residents choosing to protect their homes and property with security cameras. Canvassing a neighbourhood is a time-consuming endeavour and the program will only be as good as the data inputted. That’s why the police want your help.

The objective of the program is primarily to build a database of camera locations in our community. Adding a security camera to your property is an excellent crime prevention tool, and is a way for you to protect your OWN property. Allowing the police quick access to potential recordings of crimes in progress is a way for citizens to help make our communities safer for everyone.

Neighbourhood watch graphicThe police are No. We are asking the public to take an active part in helping make your community safer. Neighbourhood Watch was a recognized crime prevention initiative many years ago; police asked neighbours to look out for neighbours. This is the technological extension of that.

If you think this might be something you want to take part in – click on this link.

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That was a big hole in that donut - Tim Horton franchise takes a $200,000 hit.

Crime 100By Staff

July 3, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

On June 15, 2015, the owners of a Tim Hortons franchise in the City of Burlington learned there was a lot of money that didn’t make it to the bank.  The police describe the situation this way: “extensive amount of deposits remained outstanding”  as the the company attempted to complete the year-end financial statements.

The calculated loss from these outstanding balances between January 2014 until May 2015 was just over $200,000.00.

Donut hole

There was a big hole in the deposit donut at a Tim Hortons franchise in Burlington

An employee, responsible for the Tim Hortons bank deposits was identified and the owners reported the theft to Halton Police on June 29, 2015.

On June 30, 2015, the accused was arrested.

Accused:

Mariel ABEJERO, 42 years, from Hamilton has been charged with:

Theft Over $5000

The accused is schedule to attend court on July 29, 2015.

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Police are looking for a man who punched people he knew in the head at a mall in the city.

Crime 100By Staff

July 3, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It is week 11 of Halton Regional Police Service, Burlington station reaching out to the public to help locate wanted persons and hold them accountable for their actions, better known as “Fugitive Friday”

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

The Burlington Offender Management Unit will shares information on a wanted person in hopes that the public can assist in locating the individual.
In this edition of Fugitive Fridays the 3 District, Burlington Offender Management Unit is searching for Corey RODGERS 29 years old, of Hamilton, ON.

Friday fugitice Corey Rogers

Corey RODGERS 29 years of age.

It is alleged:

– In November of 2011 the accused was in Mapleview Mall in the City of Burlington when he saw a male and female he knew inside a store
– without provocation, the accused walked into the store and assaulted both the female and male by punching them in the head
– The accused was arrested at the scene and released on a Promise to Appear
– The accused was to attend Milton court in May of 2012 which he failed to do and a warrant was issued for his arrest

He is wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

Assault with a Weapon
Assault – Adult Female
Fail to Attend Court

RODGERS is described as 6’2”, 250lbs, hazel eyes and brown hair and spacer earrings. RODGERS has several tattoos; Right arm – full sleeve, right hand – “fast”, left hand – “live” and left forearm – “Nautical Star”. RODGERS has ties to Burlington, Hamilton and Alberta

Anyone who may have witnessed this male or has information that would assist investigators in identifying him are encouraged to contact D/C Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Police issue an advisory on cell phone thefts after two robberies take place hours apart in south west part of the city.

Crime 100By Pepper Parr

June 30th, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

The brazen theft of cell phones from people walking the streets of Burlington has resulted in the Halton Regional police issuing an advisory.

Burlington police station

Superintendent Al Albano, Commander District 3 – Burlington advised the public on preventing cell phone robberies.

“The Halton Regional Police is investigating the recent cell phone robberies; identifying the suspects has been made a priority. Our communities’ safety and security is of utmost importance and we encourage anyone with information on these incidents and/or the suspects described to contact investigators or Crime Stoppers to assist in preventing further incidents” said  Superintendent Al Albano, Commander 3 District

The police added: “The public are encouraged to utilize security features and apps on their phones such as “Find My Phone” and to provide the details to police who will continue efforts to locate any stolen phones.

Be sure to alert the police – they are there to help you.

Earlier in the day the Gazette reported cell phone robberies in the south east part of the city. That report said a cell phone robbery took place at 7:15 PM, when two youths were walking north on Burloak Drive, south of Spruce Avenue and were confronted by a male who demanded a cell phone be turned over of they would be shot. The suspect was given a cell phone and fled the area on foot.

Later that evening, at approximately 9:45 PM, another youth was walking south on Hampton Heath Road near Lakeshore Road when a black vehicle with three males stopped alongside the youth. Two of the males got out of the vehicle and asked to use the youths’ cell phone. After being told no, the two males began to forcefully search the youth’s pockets, taking an I-Phone, returned to the vehicle and fled the area.

Cell phone hold up - with gun

Being forced to turn over a cell phone at gun point is a terrifying experience

In the first incident, the suspect is described as a black male in his early 20’s, 6’0 tall, medium build, corn row style hair wearing a black hoodie and long cream coloured pants.

In the second incident, the suspects are all described as black males 18-20 years of age wearing dark clothing.
The police are vigorously investigating these two crimes.

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Cell Phone Robbery Incidents Connected in South East Burlington

Crime 100By Staff

June 30th, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

With the shooting death of an 18 year old in London Ontario over a cell phone – the theft of cell phones take on a heightened interest.
On Monday June 29th 2015 two street robberies occurred 2½ hours apart in southeast Burlington where cell phones were taken forcefully from their owners.

At approximately 7:15 PM, two youths were walking north on Burloak Drive, south of Spruce Avenue when they were confronted by a male who demanded a cell phone be turned over of they would be shot. The suspect was given a cell phone and fled the area on foot.

SmartPhones

Cell phones are now seen as choice items for thieves – be careful

At approximately 9:45 PM, another youth was walking south on Hampton Heath Road near Lakeshore Road when a black vehicle with three males stopped alongside the youth. Two of the males got out of the vehicle and asked to use the youths’ cell phone. After being told no, the two males began to forcefully search the youth’s pockets, taking an I-Phone, returned to the vehicle and fled the area.

In the first incident, the suspect is described as a black male in his early 20’s, 6’0 tall, medium build, corn row style hair wearing a black hoodie and long cream coloured pants.

In the second incident, the suspects are all described as black males 18-20 years of age wearing dark clothing.

Anyone who may have witnessed these incidents or have information that will assist investigators in identifying these suspects are asked to contact the Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2315 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com; or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).
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Young Hamilton male wanted by both Hamilton and Halton Regional Police; what kind of a future does this 21 year old have?

Crime 100By Staff

June 26, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It is week 10 for the Halton Regional Police “Fugitive Friday” initiative that has then asking for the public to help locate wanted persons and hold them accountable for their actions.

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

The Burlington Offender Management Unit shares information on a wanted person in hopes that the public can assist in locating the individual.

Bowlet Fugitive Friday

Brennan BOWLEY 21 years old, of Hamilton, ON, is wanted by both the Hamilton and Halton Regional Police

This week the Friday fugitive is Brennan BOWLEY 21 years old, of Hamilton, ON.

It is alleged:

In December of 2013 the accused committed a break and enter at a Burlington residence while the homeowners were present where several electronics, personal identification, house keys and car keys were stolen
Two people inside the home attempted to prevent the accused from escaping at which time the accused swerved at them attempting to hit them with his vehicle.
The accused was later tracked to a Hamilton address and was arrested in possession of the stolen items from the house
The accused was released on a Recognizance and attended court in August 2014. He was to re-attend Milton court in May of 2015 which he failed to do and a warrant was issued for his arrest

He is now wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

Break and Enter Place
Dangerous Operation Motor Vehicle
Fail to Re-Attend Court

The accused is also wanted by Hamilton Police Service for:

Fail to Comply Recognizance x 12
Possession of Property Obtained by Crime
Possession under $5000 x 3
Possession over $5000
Fail to Comply Probation x 2
Break and Enter Commit x 2

BOWLEY is described as 5’6”, 145lbs, blue eyes and brown hair.

Anyone who may have witnessed this male or has information that would assist investigators in identifying him are encouraged to contact D/C Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Halton Police Looking to Identify two shoplifting suspects who are believed to have stolen a coffee maker – they didn’t buy any coffee.

Crime 100By Staff

June 22, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Two suspects are being sought after walking out of ECS Coffee with a large coffee maker.

On Saturday June 6, 2015, at approximately 4:30pm, a male and female attended ECS Coffee at 1515 North Service Road in the City of Burlington.  The male and female went to the front corner of the store where the commercial grade coffee makers were on display.

HRPS - Coffee maker Male suspect

He was the decoy – they got away with a coffee maker worth $600 retail

HRPS - coffee maker Female suspect

She was the duck – they got away with a coffee maker worth $600 retail

As the female suspect selected a coffee machine, the male suspect faced the cashier and shielded the female with his body. The female was able to exit the store with the stolen merchandise and both suspects fled.

They got away with a Real Cup Brewer RC400 valued at $600.00.

Male suspect – heavy build, approximately 6 feet tall, light complexion, green baseball hat, dark sunglasses, blue shirt and jean shorts

Female suspect – heavy build, approximately 5 feet tall, light complexion, light blue shirt, black pants, black hair

Anyone with information is asked to contact Det Vince Couce of the Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905 825-4747 ext 2307 or anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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The daily life of a dog in the Halton Region police service - Storm is part of a family.

News 100 blueBy Pepper

June 22, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Sometime later today Halton Regional Police are expected to announce the name of the new dog that will join the K9 unit of the police service. A Burlington public school is one of the finalists.

Last week the Gazette visited with an officer at the K9 unit to learn about how the dogs are chosen, how they are trained, what they eat and where they live.

We met with Constable Matt Lawless who came to police work a little later in life than most police recruits.

Lawless points to Storm

Halton Regional Police dog handler Matt Lawless points to pictures of dogs in the K9 unit – storm is the dog he handles.

He served in Oakville as a uniformed patrol office and after six years of driving around in a police car he leaned of an opportunity to work with dogs and applied.

“It’s a tough competition but they chose me and I’ve been working with storm ever since.”

“A lot of people think we work with the dogs and tell them what to do – that’s not the way it works out” explained Cst. Lawless. “We are actually chauffeurs for the dog. We take them to work with us in the morning and take them home at night. The dog is like one of the kids that you have to drove everywhere – instead of taking kids to hockey, I take the Storm wherever he is needed.”

HRPS storm running

Storm – a part of the Police |Service K9 unit. When he has to move – he can move very very quickly.

Where do the dogs come from we asked. “The best dogs are bred in Germany but we don’t often get dogs direct from Germany. We tend to work with kennels in both Canada and the United States. We have people who work with us selecting the dogs we need.

There are now six dogs in the K9 unit – Cst. Lawless would like to see more. “They are very effective in police work – each dog tends to have its own strengths – some are good with explosives; others are good with drugs and others are very good tracking down or finding a person.

Cst. Lawless is assigned a car that has been modified for the dog. The day we met it was hot, very hot and when it came time to do some work with Storm I thought we were heading out to a kennel on the police property but we walked towards the police cruiser. “Am I going to ride to the kennel with you I asked.“

“No” responded Cst. Lawless. “Storm is in the cruiser.”

In the cruiser I thought – its roasting outside – I thought it was illegal to leave a pet in a vehicle. And it is – but Storm doesn’t live in any run of the mill police cruiser. The vehicle is outfitted with its own air conditioning and the engine of the car is never shut off when the dog is in the cruiser.
There is a complex set of measuring devices that know when to turn on the air conditioning on and when to turn on the fans that circulate the air so that the dog has a combination of fresh air that is conditioned.

Cst. Lawless reaches into the front of the vehicle and picks up the lead, opens the back door and snaps the lead on the dog’s collar and off they go. While Storm can certainly run, he tends to walk in a zig zag path with his nose pressed into the ground. This dog can sniff.

He paid no attention to me other than to sniff my hand when I held it out – after that it was as if I didn’t exist. The dog kept his eyes on Cst. Lawless watching for his hand movements and listening to his words.

The selection of a dog is an arduous process. Once selected a dog goes through a four month, 40 hours a week training program.

After the training the dog is tested. “Halton has worked with different groups on the certifying of our dogs. The RCMP used to do a lot of that work – but now we are working with trainers in the Niagara Region.”

HRPS Storm sniffing

The biggest thing Storm has going for him is his nose. He runs in a zig zag pattern with his nose almost glued to the ground.

The training isn’t limited to just the policed dogs – the dog handlers take part in ongoing training and trade notes with other police services across the country.

In Halton the police dog handlers meet once a week to work together and learn from each other. At the same time there is always a cruiser on the road with a member of the K9 unit in the back of the car. “Storm can tell there is something up just from the sound of the voices coming over the police radio. When I rev up the engine and turn on the police siren Storm begins to pace around in his space in the back of the cruiser – he knows he is going to be put to work very, very soon.

“Not all dogs make it” explained Lawless. Some turn out not to be cut out for this kind of work and new homes are found for them.

And where is home for a police dog I asked. The dog lives with the family. The police provide a unit that is kept outdoors for the dog to live in. When the dog retires he stays with the family.us. Storm is a member of the family.

Dogs like Storm will work for a number of years – the length of time they serve can range from four years to ten years.

The thinking in the K9 unit is that Storm has about another year before he gets retired from the K9 unit and Cst. Lawless returns to normal police work.

HRPS Storm waits for a command

Everything Storm does is the result of a command – given either by hand or by voice from his handler Cst. Matt Lawless

What will Cst. Lawless do next – he’s not sure. “I might write the examinations to qualify as a sergeant.”

Storm will live the good life of a retired police dog – Cst. Lawless didn’t say if he would get more than the one meal a day he gets now.

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Police looking for Bryon Jason BULLIED 28 years old, of Burlington

Crime 100By Staff

June 19, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It is week 9 for our “Fugitive Friday” initiative whereby the Halton Regional Police, Burlington station is reaching out to the public to help locate wanted persons and hold them accountable for their actions.

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

Every Friday, the Burlington Offender Management Unit will share information on a wanted person in hopes that the public can assist in locating the individual.

We will share “Fugitive Friday” information on our website and via social media through Twitter @HRPSBurl and @HaltonPolice.

FF9BULLIED

Bryon Jason BULLIED 28 years old, of Burlington, ON.

In this edition of Fugitive Fridays the 3 District, Burlington Offender Management Unit is searching for Bryon Jason BULLIED 28 years old, of Burlington, ON.

It is alleged:
• In December of 2013 the accused stole a debit card from an elderly male’s residence. He then used the card to make $1,000 worth of fraudulent purchases.
• The accused was identified through video during the incidents and a warrant was issued for his arrest
• The accused has so far managed to evade capture and his whereabouts unknown
He is wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

Theft under $5000 x 3
Unauthorized use of a Credit Card x 3
Fail to Comply with Undertaking
Breach of Probation Order

The accused is also wanted by Ottawa Police Service for:

Possession of a Substance x 2
Breach of Probation x 2
Fail to Appear

Bryon BULLIED is described as 5’9”, 200lbs, blue eyes and brown hair. BULLIED’S weight has fluctuated up to 250lbs in the past. BULLIED has tattoos (Left forearm – “Praying Hands”, Right forearm – “Cross”. Bullied has ties to Halton, Toronto and the Ottawa areas.

Anyone who may have witnessed this male or has information that would assist nvestigators in identifying him are encouraged to contact D/C Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Comfort Inn on South Service road robbed Wednesday night - clerk unharmed.

Crime 100By Staff

June 18, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It apparently wasn’t comfortable enough for the six foot male who held up the receptionist at the Comfort Inn on the south Service Road.

The Halton Regional Police are gathering information on a hotel robbery that occurred late Wednesday night at the Comfort Inn Hotel, located at 3290 South Service Rd, in the City of Burlington.

The preliminary investigation points to an unarmed suspect entering the hotel lobby at 11:50 pm and demanding money from the clerk. The suspect fled the hotel on foot with an undisclosed amount of money.

Police searched the area for the suspect with negative results. The clerk at the hotel was not injured in the incident.

The suspect is described at Male, white approximately 6 foot, medium build, wearing all black clothing.
During the robbery the suspect concealed his identity.

Anyone who may have witnessed the suspect in the area or has information that would assist in this investigation is asked to call the Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905-825-4747 ext 2315 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the internet at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com.

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Week 8 Fugitive Friday poster couple - Sean KELLY and Jessica HAYNES

Crime 100By Staff

June 12, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

It is week #8 for our “Fugitive Friday” initiative whereby the Halton Regional Police, Burlington station is reaching out to the public to help locate wanted persons and hold them accountable for their actions.

There are numerous people who continue to evade the police and the court system and continue to live out in our communities while having a warrant for their arrest in place.

Every Friday, the Burlington Offender Management Unit will share information on a wanted person in hopes that the public can assist in locating the individual.

We will share “Fugitive Friday” information on our website and via social media through Twitter @HRPSBurl and @HaltonPolice.

In this edition of Fugitive Fridays the 3 District, Burlington Offender Management Unit is searching for another couple, Sean KELLY 34 years old and Jessica HAYNES 28 years old of Hamilton, ON.

It is alleged:

• In January of 2015 the accused parties committed numerous Frauds and Thefts in Burlington
• The accused parties were located and arrested in possession of stolen property while trying to commit a Fraud and Theft at a store in Burlington
• Upon investigation KELLY provided police a false name in an attempt to hide his identity
• Haynes was released from 3 District on an appearance notice and KELLY was held for bail and appeared in court at which time they were both released on separate appearance notices with court imposed conditions
• The accused parties were required to attend court in February 2015 in Milton which they failed to do and warrants were issued for their arrest
• KELLY has 15 convictions for various offences including Robbery, Thefts, Impersonation and Fail to Comply. HAYNES has 1 prior conviction for Assault.

Kelly FF week 8

Sean Kelly, 34

KELLY is now wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

• Fraud Under $5000
• Theft Under $5000
• Personation with Intent
• Fail to Re-Attend Court

HAYNES  FF Week 8

Jessica Haynes, 28

HAYNES is now wanted by Halton Regional Police Service for:

• Fraud Under $5000
• Theft Under $5000
• Fail to Attend Court
• Fail to Comply Undertaking

Sean KELLY is described as 5’9”, 150 lbs with blue eyes and brown hair. KELLY also has Tattoos left arm – “Celtic band”, left elbow – “Sun”, Right elbow – “Make your own luck with a star”.

Jessica HAYNES is described as 5’2”, 120lbs with brown hair and green eyes. Jessica has a pierced tongue and a Tattoo right forearm – “Hourglass”. Both parties are known to frequent Halton, Hamilton, and the surrounding areas. KELLY also has ties to New Brunswick.

Anyone who may have witnessed this male or has information that would assist investigators in identifying him are encouraged to contact D/Cst Bulbrook – Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau – Offender Management Team at 905-825-4747 Ext. 2346 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Halton Police Arrest Man Related to Historical Sexual Assaults

Crime 100By Staff

June 12, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Detectives from the Halton Regional Police Service Child Abuse and Sexual Assault (CASA) Unit have charged a Burlington man in connection with historical sexual assaults stemming back to 1973.

In a media release police said “the accused male has ties to both the Halton and Hamilton regions as he has been actively involved in religious groups, while also practicing as a certified reflex therapist for the last 18 years in Burlington.”

Arrested and charged with two counts of Indecent Assault on a Female, and one count of Sexual Assault is David Allison HOLT, age 68, of Burlington, Ontario.

Mr. Holt is due to appear in Milton Court on the 8th of July, 2015.

Police encourage anyone with information related to this investigation to contact Detective Constable Alanda Prescod at the Halton Regional Police, CASA Bureau – 905 825 4747 Ext 8977 or alanda.prescod@haltonpolice.ca or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

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Clarkdale PS a finalist in the contest to name the newest recruit to the Regional Police K9 unit- they want the dog to be called Marshall

News 100 redBy Staff

June 10, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

A Burlington elementary school is one of three finalists in the contest to name the newest recruit into the Halton Regional Police K9 unit.

Clarksdale Public School, Burlington has decided the dog should be named Marshall.

Police service dog

T he students at Clarksdale Public School want this little pooch to be called Marshall – and if enough people vote for that name – that is what the dog will be called.

The other two finalists are P.L.Robertson Public School, Milton who chose the name Ranger and Brookville Public School, Campbellville who chose the name Arrow

The Regional police received emails from teachers and school officials and report being very impressed with the efforts that were put into choosing the right name. One school in Milton, as they were working on graphing units in math, chose two names, and conducted a survey of several classrooms to give every student a voice. They tallied up the votes and are completing graphs to show the results.

Several name suggestions were sent in via Twitter and from parents wanting to share their children’s creative ideas.

Now, it’s time for the community to vote! Follow our @HaltonPolice or @HRPSK9 Twitter accounts and vote for your new K9 name by Tweeting or Retweeting your favorite hashtag.

#HaltonPSDArrow

#HaltonPSDMarshall

#HaltonPSDRanger

Non-Tweeters can also vote online at https://www.haltonpolice.ca/SpecializedUnits/ESU/Canine/Pages/K9name.aspx

The name with the most hashtags and online votes will be the winner!

The winning name and school will be announced on Monday June 22, 2015

Cst Mitchell with police dog Juno being trained.  Another police dog, Storm, was used in the drug raid in east end Burlington.

Cst Mitchell with police dog Juno being trained. Juno has since been retired.

The new Police Service Dog will join PSD Tracker, PSD Storm, PSD Parker, PSD Bishop and PSD Nero in their efforts to protect and serve the communities in Halton.

The retired Police Service Dogs are: Chase, Kingston, Sniper, Justice, Honour, Gage, Kruz, Baron, Titan, Juno and Valour.

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Regional police officers now carrying Tasers - little public discussion on the need and nothing in the way of notice.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

June 7, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

The use of Tasers by police forces across Canada has been an issue for many – whacking someone with a massive jolt of electricity is better than shooting them – but a number of people die from the electrical shock from a Taser.

Taser’s are not cheap and a police force needs time and money to train its staff.

Why does all this matter – because the Halton Regional Police Force is now arming some of its officers with Taser’s.

There hasn’t been any public discussion about the need for the weapon. Burlington’s representative on the Police Services Board hasn’t said a word and we have not seen a media release on the introduction of Tasers.

The Gazette was given a heads up a number of months ago that the Halton Regional Police had placed an order for 400 units.

HRPS taser

That yellow object just above the police officers right hand is the pistol grip of a Taser. Burlington is reported to have ordered several hundred of the devices.

We realized the order had been placed and that officers were now armed with the deadly weapon device when we saw one of the devices on the hip of asn officer investigating a disturbance complaint in front of a local pub.

A Taser isn’t meant to kill but the piece that follows – which came from the CBC – makes it pretty clear that they do and that many police forces are not properly trained.

Tasers are hand-held weapons that deliver a jolt of electricity through a pair of wires propelled by compressed air from up to 10.6 metres away.

The jolt stuns the target by causing an uncontrollable contraction of the muscle tissue. The target is immobilized and falls to the ground — regardless of pain tolerance or mental focus.

Taser stands for “Thomas A. Swift Electric Rifle.” It is named after a series of children’s science-fiction novels written in the early 20th century featuring the young genius inventor Tom Swift.

Who makes them?
Arizona-based Taser International makes virtually all of the stun guns being used today. The technical term for a stun gun is a “conducted energy device” (CED) or “conducted energy weapon” (CEW).  Taser International says more than 16,200 law enforcement agencies in more than 40 countries use its devices. Since early 1998, more than 543,000 Taser brand immobilizers have been sold to law enforcement agencies.

There are five main types of stun guns made by Taser used by law enforcement agencies:

M26: A high-powered weapon marketed to police forces to stop “highly combative individuals.” A burst of compressed nitrogen launches two small probes attached to the device by conductive wires. From as far as 10.6 metres, the device transmits electrical pulses through the wires to immobilize a person. Also has a laser sight for aiming.
X26: A smaller model introduced in 2003. Launches two small probes as far as 10.6 metres.
X3: A triple-shot semi-automatic introduced in 2009. Capable of deploying three separate sets of two small probes as far as 10.6 metres as a backup shot in the event of a miss or to stop up to three separate targets.
X2: A double-shot semi-automatic introduced in 2011. Capable of deploying two separate sets of two small probes as far as 10.6 metres as a backup shot in the event of a miss or to stop up to two separate targets.
XREP: A CED projectile deployed by a pump action 12-guage shotgun round capable of hitting targets as far away as 30 metres.

What is ‘excited delirium?’
Excited delirium has been cited as a factor in the deaths of several people who were shocked by stun guns.
According to some psychologists, a person with excited delirium acts agitated, violent, sweats profusely and is unusually strong and insensitive to pain. Then, the victim’s heart races and eventually stops beating.

In the United States, Tasers are not considered firearms and are legal for civilian use in most states. Some cities, counties and states do restrict — or ban — their use by people who are not police officers. The company will not ship its product outside the United States unless the person placing the order holds a valid import/export permit.

In Canada, however, Tasers are a prohibited weapon. Only one company can import them into Canada under a special permit, and they can only sell the devices to law enforcement agencies, said RCMP Cpl. Greg Gillis, who trains police officers in how to use Tasers. Each Taser sale is registered and tracked, much like a handgun, he said.

Tasers are supposed to allow police officers to subdue violent individuals without killing them. A police officer can “take down” a threatening suspect without worrying that a stray bullet might kill or injure an innocent bystander.

“There’s no question that there are certainly lots of documented examples in Canada where had we not had the Taser and had to respond with more traditional options, that it could have resulted in a higher level of force,” said Gillis. “For example, the firearm: … with a firearm, there are only two outcomes … it’s going to be a permanent injury or a loss of life.”

“We don’t speak often enough about the number of lives that have been saved, the number of people that are up and walking around today that might not have been had it not been for a Taser,” says Steve Palmer, executive director of the Canadian Police Research Centre. The CPRC is a partnership among the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the RCMP and the National Research Council of Canada.

Amnesty International says that between 2001 and August 2008, 334 Americans died after Taser shocks. The stun gun was deemed to have caused or contributed to at least 50 of those deaths, Amnesty says, citing medical examiners and coroners. Most suspects were unarmed, and many were subjected to repeated or prolonged shocks, according to Amnesty.

On Oct. 14, 2007, Robert Dziekanski, 40, of Pieszyce, Poland, died at Vancouver International Airport after being shocked five times with a Taser by RCMP officers.  Airport security called the RCMP for help after Dziekanski allegedly was pounding on windows and throwing chairs and computer equipment.

Initially, the Mounties speculated that he died from a rare condition called excited delirium. Excited delirium is described as an agitated state in which a person experiences an irregular heartbeat and suddenly dies. It can happen to psychiatric patients and people using drugs such as cocaine. But critics charge that excited delirium is not a valid medical term.

A coroner concluded Dziekanski died as a result of the stress from both the Taser stuns and the struggle with police as they pinned him to the ground and handcuffed him.
How much electricity does a Taser use?  News reports will often quote the voltage delivered by a Taser — up to 50,000 volts. That sounds like a lot of electricity, but it’s a misleading way of expressing the power a Taser uses.

Voltage and current:  Electricity is the flow of electrons through a wire or other conductor. Voltage and current are two separate ways of measuring electricity.  Voltage is the amount of force that is driving a flow of electrons. If you imagine electricity as water flowing through a pipe, the voltage is the water pressure in the pipe.   Current, measured in amperes or amps, is the rate of flow of electrons through a wire, similar to the rate of water flow in a pipe, measured in litres per second.   It’s possible for an electrical circuit to have high voltage, but low current. It would be analogous to a dentist’s water jet used to remove plaque: high pressure, but low flow.   A low-voltage, high-current circuit would be analogous to a storm sewer. A great deal of water passes through but at low pressure.

Tasers work by passing electricity through a pair of wires. Weighted barbed hooks at the ends of the wires are propelled toward the target by compressed air.  Tasers are designed to incapacitate a person through up to five centimetres of clothing. Taser International says the electrical pulse is delivered at a high voltage because the electric current has to pass through clothing and air — neither of which is a good conductor of electricity — to make a complete circuit with the target’s skin.

Taser International also says that while its device can deliver up to 50,000 volts in an open air arc only, it does not deliver that much voltage to a person’s body. The company says its Taser X26 delivers an average of 1,200 volts.   As well, the high-voltage pulse of a Taser is said to carry only a small current, typically 0.002 to 0.03 amps.

By comparison, electrical outlets in Canada deliver 120 volts of electricity, and the current they carry depends on the appliance that’s plugged into them. A 60-watt light bulb, for example, pulls 0.5 amps, while a toaster pulls about five amps.   It’s possible to suffer a fatal shock from a household electrical socket, at just 120 volts with 15 amps, if enough current passes through the body.

The procedures, conducted by U.S.-based lab National Technical Systems, found that 10 per cent of the X26 model Tasers produced more electrical current than the weapon’s specifications.

In some cases, the current was up to 50 per cent stronger than specified. The X26 Tasers were manufactured before 2005 and are one of the most commonly used models.

Taser International said CBC made scientific errors by failing to spark-test the weapons before firing them, a process the company recommends police officers do on a regular basis. But engineers who reviewed the testing protocol for CBC said the tests were based on solid practices.
What’s the Canadian perspective?

Since Dziekanski’s death,Taser use in Canada has come under intense scrutiny.

The RCMP in May 2010, released new stun gun restrictions, indicating officers are only permitted to use the weapons in cases where a person is causing bodily harm or an officer has “reasonable grounds” to believe a person will “imminently” harm someone.

RCMP officers must also give a verbal warning “where tactically feasible” before using their stun guns, according to the new policy.

In December 2009, Paul Kennedy, head of the Commission for Complaints Against the RCMP, the RCMP watchdog agency, had released a damning report on the conduct of RCMP involved in the Dziekanski’s death. Specifically, Kennedy criticized the RCMP’s training practices and use of force guidelines, saying the force appears to have dropped historic guidelines directing officers to minimize intervention and use the least amount of force required to get the best results.

A provincial public inquiry into the use of Tasers and the death of Dziekanski began on May 5, 2008, in Vancouver under commissioner Thomas Braidwood, a retired B.C. Appeal Court justice. In a preliminary report made public July 23, 2009, he concluded that stun guns can be deadly and that the B.C. provincial government had abdicated its responsibility to establish province-wide standards for their use.

After the release of the first report, the B.C. provincial government said it would act immediately to adopt Braidwood’s recommendations.

The Braidwood Inquiry in its final report, released in June 2010, concluded the RCMP was not justified in using a Taser against Dziekanski.

“This tragic case is, at its heart, a story of shameful conduct by a few officers,” Braidwood said.

The report called for an independent provincial body to investigate police actions and warned that public confidence in the RCMP was flagging.
How many police forces use stun guns?

Across Canada, 129 law enforcement agencies were using CEWs by the end of 2010.

In 2008, the RCMP, which introduced Tasers into its arsenal in 2001, had 2,800 Tasers and 9,100 officers who were trained to use them.

Figures compiled by the Canadian Police Research Centre suggest that most mid-size police forces use stun guns between 50 to 60 times a year on average. They were used 51 times in 2006 by police officers in Quebec.

Statistics prepared by RCMP officers show that Mounties drew or threatened to draw their Tasers more than 1,400 times in 2007, up from 597 in 2005.

Public concern is growing over the increasing use of Tasers in light of mixed reports on their safety and the lack of details surrounding incidents of Taser deployment by law enforcement agencies. Many of the incident reports released publicly by the RCMP are incomplete, with several key areas left blank.

That was probably more information than you wanted or needed – given what we now know does Halton really need Tasers?

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Citizen spots man with knife in his waistband - calls police - arrest made; not the first arrest for this man.

Crime 100By Staff

June 5, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

On Thursday June 4th 2015 at about 8:00 PM, a citizen observed a male concealing a knife in the front of his waistband in the area of Hurd Street and Caroline Street in Burlington.

Police responded to the area, located and arrested the male a short distance away. The male was found to be in possession of a small quantity of marihuana as well as two knifes concealed in his waistband.

After further investigation, it was learned the two knives had just been stolen from an unlocked vehicle on Hurd Street.

Police also located a pair of sunglasses and an iPod on the ground in an area where the male had been observed hopping a fence on Hurd Street. The owner of this property has not been located. Anyone missing such items are encouraged to call the investigating officer.

Arrested and held for bail is:

Wayne Gordon PUNTER (38 yrs) of Maple Crossing Boulevard in Burlington

Charges:

Theft under $5000
Breach Probation X 3
Possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose
Possession of a controlled substance (marihuana)

The Gazette gets a news feed from the police regularly. We are amazed at the number of arrests made by the police based on a call they got from an observant citizen. It would be interesting to note what the conviction rate was.

Anyone with information on this or any other crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

-30-

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Province gets tougher on drivers who insist on using their cell phones - fine could reach $1000.

News 100 redBy Staff

June 4, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Yacking away on your cell phone while driving could cost you a fine of $1,000 and the loss of three demerit points – and probably a boost in your insurance premium.

Cell phone while driving

This kind of behaviour will cost three demerit points and a possible $1000 fine. Let’s hope judges decide not to be timid when handing out the fines

An amendment to the Highway Traffic Act — one of several new road safety measures — is to become law this fall. The legislation to make this happen received unanimous support.

Before the police begin their crack down the transportation ministry will be launching an education campaign to make sure motorists get the message that distracted driving is eclipsing drunk driving for causing fatalities.

“People have to be constantly reminded that it is crucial to keep their eyes on the road,” said the Minister of Transportation, adding that what is really needed is “cultural transformation” that drives homes to motorists that driving requires 100 per cent of their attention.

Police and officials with safety organizations have been urging government for years now to toughen up the penalties for distracted driving, which currently only carries a fine.

Police have “seen a disturbing trend with needless deaths on the rise. They are totally preventable. Since distracted driving laws were introduced in 2009, 505 lives have been lost in OPP-investigated collisions in which driver distraction was a causal factor.”
Brian Patterson, president and CEO at Ontario Safety League, said distracted driving “is not just a bad habit, it’s a deadly habit,” adding there are many patients at Toronto’s Sunnybrook hospital who bear witness to that.

“As people get the message the roads will become safer,” said Patterson, adding that sometimes it also takes a ticket to get a driver’s attention.

Cycling driver dooring a cyclist

Fines for drivers that “door” cyclists to be increased + increase in demerit points.

The Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act will:

Increase fines for distracted driving from the current range of $60 to $500 to a range of $300 to $1,000, assign three demerit points upon conviction, and escalate sanctions for novice drivers who are convicted.

Apply current alcohol-impaired sanctions to drivers who are drug-impaired.

Require drivers to let pedestrians completely cross the road before proceeding at school crossings and pedestrian crossovers.

Increase fines and demerit points for drivers who “door” cyclists, and require all drivers to maintain a minimum distance of one metre when passing cyclists where possible, as well as allow cyclists to use the paved shoulders on unrestricted provincial highways.

Help municipalities collect unpaid fines by expanding licence plate denial for drivers who do not pay certain Provincial Offences Act fines.

Allow more qualified medical professionals to identify and report medically unfit drivers and, clarify the types of medical conditions to be reported.

The new fines and measures will come into force over the coming months, the transportation ministry says.

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Guitar thieves arrested day after news story appears - two charged with theft over $5000.

Crime 100By Staff

June 4, 2015

BURLINGTON, ON

Well that didn’t take very long did it?

The Gazette posted a short news story on two people caught on camera at Long & McQuade stealing two guitars.

The two persons were arrested in Hamilton with the assistance of uniformed officers from the Hamilton Police Service.

Female suspect Long and McQuade

Amber FISHER

Intel(R) JPEG Library, version [1.51.12.44]

Stephen FRASER

Both entered the store carrying empty guitar cases. The suspects were observed on video surveillance to select two high end guitars and place them in the cases. The suspects then exited the store making no attempt to pay for the concealed items. The two stolen guitars are a GIBSON ES 345TDC and a GIBSON USA LP Traditional.

Both persons were returned to Burlington for further investigation which resulted in the recovery of both stolen guitars.
Stephen FRASER (27-yrs) and Amber FISHER (21-yrs) both of Hamilton are charged with theft over $5000 and will appear in Milton Court on June 24th 2015.

They won’t be strumming the strings of those Gibson’s at the Sound of Music Festival.

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