Registration for Summer Camps and Park Play Program opens May 1

News 100 greenBy Staff

April 28th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Is that light at the end of the tunnel?

The small buds on the trees are turning into leaves; the Farmer’s Market has announced they are opening in the middle of May.
And now the city Parks and Recreation department has announced that registrations for summer camps will open on May 1st.

This is progress.

The City is hopeful that Summer Camps and a new Park Play program will be able to run, with registration for both opening May 1, 2021 at 9 a.m. As always, any City-run program will be subject to the Provincial and public health regulations and could be cancelled as we continue to respond to this pandemic.

To help reduce the spread of COVID-19, summer programs will meet health regulations designed in consultation with Halton Region Public Health and in alignment with provincial health regulations. Precautions include lower ratios of participant to staff and capacity, physical distancing, mandatory health screening and enhanced facility cleaning.

Natural parks

No one within six feet.

Park Play Program
The Park Play program is for children and youth ages 8 to 14 years and includes fun, active and creative games run by City staff in four local parks: Iroquois Park, Mohawk Park, Cavendish Park and Leighland Park. The program will run July 19 to Aug. 13, 2021.

The participants may choose not to stay the entire time, they can leave and go home for lunch and come back or bring their lunch to the park to eat. Sign in and out procedures are the same as Drop- in programs, but only registered participants are permitted to participate with the group.

Summer Camp
Similar to 2020 summer camps for youth ages 4 to 16 years, this year’s program will offer outdoor and physical activities, active and quiet games, arts and crafts, and nature-based activities. These camps are inclusive for all participants and feature additional staff for a smaller camper to leader ratios to help maintain physical distancing in camp and ensure safe supervision of campers.
Summer Camps include:

• SNAP 4 to 10 years old
• Youth 9 to 14 years old
• Junior Leadership 12 to 14 years old
• Leaders in Training for 14 old 16 years old
• Music Camp for 7 to 10 years old
• Student Theatre:
o Arts Camp for 6 to 15 years old
o Theatre Specialty Camps for 9 to 15 years old

All programs have spaces for Individuals with Disabilities within each camp group.

To register or for more information, visit burlington.ca/summer.

Recreation Fee Assistance
Recreation Fee Assistance is funding made available to individuals or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreational programs.
For more information or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance. Information available by telephone – call 905-335-7600, ext. 8501 to leave a voice mail.

Glenn Chris

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, community and Culture said: “Last summer’s camp programs went very well and we’re hoping to build on that success for this year. The new Park Play program is not a day camp but will offer many of the same fun games and activities that people of all abilities can participate in. ”

Links and Resources
www.burlington.ca/summer
www.burlington.ca/feeassistance

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Film on how we manage contentedness and disconnectedness during a pandemic

News 100 redBy Staff

April 28th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Emergency Preparedness Week (EPW) is an annual Canada-wide initiative encouraging all Canadians to take actions to be better prepared to protect themselves and their families during emergencies.

In line with the pressures of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and this year’s EPW theme of Emergency Preparedness: Be Ready for Anything, the City of Burlington is launching the first of multiple screenings of the film The Great Disconnect.

Residents can sign up for the free May 4 or 6 virtual screenings of The Great Disconnect which will include a panel discussion with local leaders and film crew members.

Link to the Eventbrite site to register: CLICK HERE

Great disconnect pic

Two screening: one during the day and a second in the evening.

About the film

The Great Disconnect uncovers why, in a world seemingly more connected than ever before, people are feeling more and more socially isolated – and the true cost this has on our lives and communities. It was written, directed and produced by passionate people wanting to make a difference in the lives of those who live in their communities, neighbourhoods and abroad. Since its official launch in October 2019, the film has screened across Canada through multiple municipalities, non-profits and NGOs, and has been shown in ten countries across Europe. It has also been featured in over twelve independent film festivals, and in October 2020, the documentary won the award for Best Feature Film at the prominent Better Cities Film Festival. The judges’ panel included the famous architect Jan Gehl alongside other esteemed architects and urbanists.

disconnect awaards graphic

Acclaimed.

Synopsis

Experts who were interviewed for The Great Disconnect, described our time as the “age of loneliness.” Despite Western advances in technology, living conditions, education and healthcare, we as a society, are isolating ourselves from one another and because of this, facing a health crisis that affects all ages, genders, races, and cultures. But how have we become so disconnected? And what can we do to change the status quo and fulfill our potential for health and well-being? Join wellness expert Tamer Soliman as he journeys through North American cities to meet with local citizens, community activists, and leading authorities on social, economic, and urban planning to discover the true factors that have profound and lasting impacts, not only on our health, but the health of the communities in which we live.

Virtual screenings

Residents can sign up for one of the free May virtual screenings on Eventbrite and take our quick survey to help inform the discussion with the panelists at Great Disconnect Survey.

Tuesday, May 4, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The panel will include:

  • Tamer Soliman, Director, Producer and Co-Writer of The Great Disconnect
  • Sarah Douglas, Writer and Story Editor of The Great Disconnect
  • Lisa Crapsi, Recreation Coordinator for Neighbourhood Development, City of Burlington
  • Susan Biggs, A/ Superintendent – #1 District |Milton|Halton Hills, Halton Regional Police service

Thursday, May 6, 6 to 8 p.m.

The panel will include:

  • Tamer Soliman, Director, Producer and Co-Writer of The Great Disconnect
  • Sarah Douglas, Writer and Story Editor of The Great Disconnect
  • Steve Jones, Master Trainer, Mental Health Commission of Canada
  • Karen Roche, Fire Chief, City of Burlington
  • Lisa Crapsi, Recreation Coordinator for Neighbourhood Development, City of Burlington
  • Sergeant Ryan Smith, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Halton Regional Police Service
  • Beth Martin, Founder, Together Burlington
  • Ryan Gallagher, Founder and Host, Mental Edge Lifestyle Podcast

This Emergency Preparedness Week event is an opportunity for community members to view this timely documentary that invites people to reflect on the relationships we have with those around us and raises the question: is it possible to overcome our modern culture of disconnectedness and rediscover how truly essential we are to one other?

In an emergency, residents may need to evacuate or stay in their homes for long periods of time. Everyone needs a kit with enough supplies to keep you and your family self-sufficient for at least 72 hours. Either build your own kit or buy an emergency kit online and in stores across Canada.

Amber Rushton, Community Emergency Management Coordinator explains the context in which the film is being screened: “With the pandemic impacts we have all experienced in our own way, social connectedness, other-centred action, and neighbourhood preparedness will help us recover and build our new normal as a community.

“Everyone has a role to play in an emergency and building community resilience and mental health readiness is critical in protecting ourselves and our loved ones. The City of Burlington is proud to provide this virtual viewing opportunity to residents to help shine a light on the importance of the health of our communities.”

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People with hearing impairment will benefit from hearing loops to be set up in the city

News 100 blueBy Staff

April 27, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington will receive $59,700 from the Ontario Government’s Inclusive Community Grants program that will be used to install hearing loop systems in city recreation centres to help individuals with hearing aids and cochlear implants get clearer sound, participate more fully and enjoy their experiences in programs and activities.

As part of the Burlington Active Aging Plan, the City has expanded recreational programs for older adults and seniors across the city. As this segment of the population grows in Burlington so does the demand for recreational services. This initiative will help keep older adults and seniors active, healthy and engaged in the community and offer them recreation and social programs that will enrich their quality of life. These projects are planned for completion by March 31, 2022.

hearing hand at ear

4 million people in Canada have some degree of hearing loss.

The Canadian Hard of Hearing Association estimates that 4 million people in Canada have some degree of hearing loss, which works out to almost 1 in 10 Canadians. Hearing aids are an effective solution to improving hearing quality. However, hearing aids are not always effective in all environments on their own. Induction loop systems (hearing loops) are a great way of improving sound quality for individuals wearing hearing aids or cochlear implants.

Many individuals in City programs rely on hearing aids. By installing hearing loops in City facilities, it will make it easier for these individuals to hear and have a more positive experience.

Hearing loops will be installed in areas including customer service counters, meeting rooms, multi-purpose program rooms and auditoriums in City facilities that host the majority of adult and senior programs. Initially, the City will focus on five community centres:

Haber name in sign

Haber Recreational Centre is one of the locations for the hearing loops.

The Burlington Seniors’ Centre, Tansley Woods Community Centre, Haber Community Centre, Mountainside Community Centre and Brant Hills Community Centre.

The next phase will look at customer service counters at various City pools.

Ward 4 Councillor, Shawna Stolte said: “As our older adult and senior population grows in Burlington, it’s important for the City of Burlington to invest in safe, accessible community spaces for individuals of all ages and abilities to enjoy.

“I am proud of my fellow council members for recognizing this need and investing City funding to augment this grant. This will allow the City to install hearing loops in as many facilities and spaces as possible to enhance the recreation experience for those in our community with hearing loss.”

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An interesting Mother's Day option: A Tea Treat at the Ireland House Museum

eventspink 100x100By Staff

April 26th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Coming up with something to do for Mom on Sunday May 9th will be a little more challenging this year.

It will be the second year in a row when the traditional visit can’t take place.

What are the options out there?

If Mom has a taste for quality tea in a different setting give some thought to the online Mother’s Day Victorian Tea and Treats.

Museum Tea Treat

Tickets are $30 and include a Victorian Dessert Trio (Victorian sponge cake, currant scones, lemon shortbread), three 20g samples of Monarch Tea Co. loose leaf tea, and a 45-minute tea tasting led by certified Tea Sommelier, Katie Cyr.

Tea and treat package pick-up is Saturday, May 8 between 11:00 am – 3:00 pm at Ireland House Museum.

The online portion of the event takes place from 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm on Sunday, May 9. It includes a hearth demonstration and a tour of the ladies’ parlour at Ireland House Museum.

Tickets can be ordered by clicking here

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Gardener in chief recruiting volunteers for the Food Bank community garden.

graphic community 2By Pepper Parr

April 24th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Food Bank managed to have 7 plots in the community Garden on Maple Avenue assigned to them.

They then had to find a volunteer who would oversee the operation of those 7 plots.

That volunteer would then have to recruit a volunteer crew to manage each of the plots.

Sam LaGRand 2

Sam LeGrand and Robin Bailey at the market garden site on Maple Avenue

Robin Bailey, Executive Director of the Food Bank did the interviewing and felt he had the ideal volunteer – Samantha LeGrand, who prefers to be known as Sam.

The two of them did a short interview on-site where Sam asked for people to foster some of the seedlings she has – she has run out of space at her own dwelling.

Sam LaGrand 1

Sam LaGrand – Good Bank gardener

If you think you could look after some of those seedlings please go to the Food Bank web site and register as a volunteer and then select the tab on the registration to do with Community Garden help.

In early May Sam will need volunteer help for planting, and then subsequently help for watering and weeding throughout the season.  You can contact  Sam at garden@burlingtonfoodbank.ca

Sam brings an eclectic education to the gardening she is going to supervise – she is the kind of gardener who gets her fingers dirty.

She was a student at OCAD, the Ontario College of Arts and Design where she studied drawing and painting – she has had a number of gallery showings.  She was also a student at Western University where she studied astro-physics and creative writing.

She said she loved the job she has at the Children’s Place; retail was something she liked.

Gardening is as much a passion as it is working.  Sam knows gardening – she has some ideas for the different designs she wants to use – high yield is one of her objectives.

The community gardens in Burlington – there are now seven of them – was the result of work done by Michelle Bennett and Amy Schnur when they approached city council in 2015 looking for support on an application they had made to the provincial government to create community gardens.

The province required municipal support for every grant they provided – at the time city council wasn’t all warm and fuzzy about the idea.  They were reluctant to put up some real dollars.

Amy and Michelle weren’t prepared to walk away from the project – they convinced the Parks and Recreation department to put in the water service that was needed.  From that point on community gardens were real – they sold out the day they were opened.

Related news stories

Community gardens a hit

How Burlington community gardens got started

 

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Public school board hosting Mental Health & Well-Being Information Sessions

News 100 blueBy Staff

April 21st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

anxious person

Halton District School Board – Supporting positive mental health and well-being.

The Halton District School Board is hosting more than 15 Mental Health & Well-Being Information Sessions for parents/guardians, with the first session held on April 27 and others scheduled throughout the month of May. These sessions will cover specific topics based on feedback from parents/guardians through a survey sent earlier this year. Each will be led by a mental health expert in that area who will share their knowledge and provide helpful information and resources.

Session presenters will include HDSB staff and mental health experts from local community organizations including Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK), ADAPT, Danielle’s Place, National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC), Eat2Grow, CHM Therapy Services, Halton Support Services, Developmental Services of Ontario, Mental Health and Addiction Nurses, Roots Community Services, and Bayridge Counselling Centres.

To Register CLICK HERE

Session topics include:
Healthy eating, body image, eating disorders
• Self-regulation and emotional well-being
• Substance use, vaping, online/video gaming
• Supporting children with learning disabilities
• Social isolation and connectedness for 2SLGBTQ+ youth
• Impact of COVID-19 and racism for Black identifying families
• Staying engaged during online learning
• Anxiety
• Psychiatric medications

Registration is required for these sessions as limited spots are available. Parents/guardians can register by completing the Mental Health & Well-Being Information Sessions Registration Form. Sessions will be held on Google Meet or Zoom (depending on the session) and registrants will be emailed a link to access the session. Sessions will not be recorded.

Parents/guardians will have the opportunity to submit questions when completing the registration form or during the session.

The Board’s new Mental Health & Well-Being webpage has information for parents/guardians and students on mental health, ways to support positive mental health and well-being and how to get additional support at school and in the community.

Mental health postcard

 

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Keeping the faith that we will hear that applause again one day soon; because the show must go on!

artsorange 100x100By Tammy Fox

April 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

I find it beyond belief that we have been existing in this Twilight Zone of a pandemic for over an entire year now.  COVID has, and continues to have, absolutely devastating effects on everyone – personally, professionally, economically, socially – you name it.

Fox Tammy with glasses

Tammy Fox, Executive Director, Burlington Performing Arts Centre

We invested a great deal of time, effort and funds in developing a sold COVID-safety plan for BPAC last summer so that by early fall we would be in a position to welcome back reduced-capacity audiences in the safest way possible.  We increased our air filtration, purchased plexiglass screens and every type of PPE available.

We invested in a socially-distanced ticketing system and seating plans, as well as patron self-screening software.  We thoroughly sanitize the venue at least three times daily.  When we were finally permitted live audiences of up to 50 people for October and November we scrambled to put together an exciting ‘mini-season’ of incredible artists, like Tom Cochrane, Chantal Kreviazuk, The Spoons and more.

We sold out every performance and I watched as my technical staff’s eyes welled up with tears on our ‘opening night’, overcome with emotion at having the opportunity to finally return after 6 months of suspended operation to what it is that we all do best.  To the industry that we love.  And then just like that we were slammed back into the ‘red zone’ and the stage lights went dim once again.

Now we are once again in lockdown.  We are struggling to understand why we are not permitted to support our community and the Canadian arts ecology when we all need it most, by at the very least offering livestream performances.  A typical livestream production might involve 5 – 10 people, between staff and artists, carefully and safely socially distanced in our incredibly spacious venue – but no, the province has deemed that too risky.

Film shoots involving 100 cast and crew are ok.  For a long while, allowing hundreds to cram into malls and big box stores was ok.  But no livestreaming allowed!  Once simply can’t help but feel that the notion of the arts being somehow superfluous, non-essential to the health and spirit of a community is now up in lights on the marquee for all to see.  It’s a very scary time for our industry, which has been deemed ‘the hardest hit’.  Our industry will be the very last permitted to return to full operations.  Ours will take the longest to fully recover.

With that said, there is an incredible amount of heart and effort going into advocacy efforts for the live entertainment sector.  Federal agencies are doing what they can to keep us sustainable until life can return to ‘normal’.  I do believe that people are eager to return.  I feel that people are now truly becoming aware of the cavernous gap left in our lives and in our communities when the performing arts go dark.  You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone – but absence will make the heart grow fonder!

burlington-performing-arts-centre-hall-03-leed-gold@2x

There will come a day when there will once again be a full house

At present, I think that the best that we can hope for is offer a series of performances outdoors on our Plaza this summer. I hope to see us being permitted to operate at a percentage of capacity by the fall.  At some point someone has to do the math and see that 250 patrons spread out across a 718-seat venue is safer than 50 people crammed into a Walmart check-out line.

Jazz-SRO-768x451

An outdoor performance on the plaza where the best seats were on a marble bench.

In the meantime, we are constantly trying to find ways to support our staff, our patrons and our local artists and arts organizations and to keep our volunteers informed and engaged.  We have been working with the HDSB by offering students a virtual education series, and we are developing an artist residency program that will see us offering our space and services to local artists.  And mostly, we are working towards remaining optimistic and keeping the faith that we will hear that applause again one day soon.  It will happen.

Because the show must go on!

Tammy Fox is the Executive Director of the Burlington Performing Arts Centre

 

 

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Plants that can only make a dismal time feel much nicer - available May 1st

graphic community 2By Staff

April 5th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

They have been doing it for 25 years – providing lush hanging baskets of flowers.

The event is part of a fund raiser where everyone wins.  St. Matthews Church in Aldershot takes great pleasure in making these plants available.

A bright spot in a not so bright situation.

They go quite quickly. Get your order

21- Plants Order Form Flyer

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City Clerk getting prepared for the 2022 municipal election - hopefully it will be cleaner than the 2018 event

News 100 blueBy Staff

April 1st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

City Hall is slowly slipping into election mode.

They have started the process by putting out a survey to get a sense as to what people want in the way of information and instructions when a municipal election takes place.

Ballot going in boxWith an average voter turnout of 37% over the past three years one could venture to say – not very much – they don’t seem to care all that much.

In preparation for the upcoming 2022 municipal election, the City of Burlington is asking residents for their input on a number of election-related topics. Share your input on things like voting methods, election signage, voter turnout and more.

Your feedback will be used to inform a report to Burlington City Council about preparation activities for the 2022 municipal election which will take place on Oct. 24, 2022.

Couple of interesting ideas are floated in the survey – make a point of running through it – nothing difficult.

They ask how you feel about establishing a Campaign Contribution Rebate Program.

Should the City post candidate information, including their photos and responses to a standard community questionnaire on the City’s website to support public engagement for the 2022 municipal election?

The survey asks residents for feedback on various election matters, including:

Ideas to increase voter turnout
Suggestions for topics and panelists at an upcoming election open house
Voting methods
Using corporate resources in an election year
Rebates for campaign contributions
The management of election signs

The survey will be open until 11:59 p.m. on April 23, 2021.

Link to the survey is HERE

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Holiday schedule: It is about more than the Easter Bunny

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 29th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

City of Burlington administrative services will be closed for Good Friday, on Friday, April 2, and Easter Monday, on Monday, April 5.

For a list of which City services and facilities are available on the Easter holiday weekend, please see the summary below or visit burlington.ca

The information provided below is accurate as of March 29, 2021. In the event of any changes made to current COVID-19 public health measures by the Province of Ontario, please visit burlington.ca/coronavirus for potential impacts to City services and programs.

Residents can also stay informed about city news on our social media channels: @cityburlington on Twitter and facebook.com/cityburlington.

City Service Holiday Closure Information

sick cat

You are going to have to nurse the cat yourself.

Animal Services
The Animal Shelter at 2424 Industrial St. remains closed to the public due to COVID-19.

To report an animal control-related emergency, call 905-335-3030 or visit www.burlington.ca/animal.

Burlington Transit will operate a Sunday schedule on Good Friday. For real-time bus information and schedules visit myride.burlingtontransit.ca.
The downtown terminal at 430 John St. and Specialized Dispatch will be closed on Friday, April 2.

City Hall The Service Burlington counter at City Hall (426 Brant St.), will be closed to all appointments and walk-in service on Friday, April 2 and Monday, April 5.
Many service payments are available online at burlington.ca/onlineservices.

Halton Court Services – Provincial Offences Office Court administration counter services at 4085 Palladium Way will be closed on Friday April 2, 2020 and Monday April 5, 2021.

With the exception of the Easter closure, telephone payments are available at 905-637-1274, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.

All in-person services are available from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday. Many services are also available by email at burlingtoncourt@burlington.ca or online at Halton Court Services

Parking Free parking is available downtown, on the street, in municipal lots and in the parking garage (414 Locust St.) on weekends and holidays, including Good Friday and Easter Monday.
NOTE: The Waterfront parking lots (east and west) do not provide free parking on statutory holidays.
Parking exemptions are required to park overnight on city streets and for longer than five hours. Visit burlington.ca/parkingexemptions

Recreation Programs and Facilities Drop-In Recreation Activities
All users must pre-register and complete the online COVID-19 screening at burlington.ca/screening. Registration opens 25 hours in advance of program start times. To view program times, visit burlington.ca/dropinandplay

centennial pool - inside

Centennial pool

Swimming
• Lap swimming and recreational swimming are available at Tansley Woods Community Centre (1996 Itabashi Way) and Centennial Pool (5151 New St.)

Skating
• Recreational skating is available at Appleby Ice Centre (1201 Appleby Line) and Mountainside Arena (2205 Mt. Forest Dr). An artificial rink at Hidden Valley Park (1137 Hidden Valley Rd.) is open for skating daily from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and is ideal for young families and people learning to skate. Capacity on the rink is 10 people.

Lending Library
Play Equipment
• Horseshoes, glow in the dark soccer balls, Kanjam, washer toss, tennis, Spikeball and more are available to borrow. Visit burlington.ca/playlending

Pickleball Equipment
• Borrow pickleball equipment for free, including noise-reducing paddles, ball packs and portable nets that can be used anywhere. Visit burlington.ca/pickleball

Outdoor Activities
Please see below for a list of opportunities available in Burlington (weather permitting) or visit www.burlington.ca/outdoorplay.

Please note: several of the outdoor recreational amenities listed below are not monitored. We ask that you cooperate with others using the space and follow all COVID-19 health precautions and posted signage. If the outdoor recreational space is busy, please try another outdoor recreational amenity in the city or come back at a different time. Please be kind to one another, remain vigilant and stay safe.

Tennis and Pickleball Courts
• Outdoor tennis and pickleball courts at Leighland Park (1200 Leighland Rd.) and Optimist Park (2131 Prospect St.) are open and available for play daily, from 8 a.m. to dusk.

This is the rural Burlington residents want to keep - walking trails and quiet countryside.

This is the rural Burlington residents want to keep – walking trails and quiet countryside.

Parks and Trails
• Enjoy any of the city’s trails and parks. Visit burlington.ca/outdoorplay

Active at Home
Options to stay active at home are available online at burlington.ca/activeathome, including a series of virtual activities from fitness to crafts for everyone to enjoy. All videos are free and new videos are added frequently.

Follow @BurlingtonParksRec on Facebook and @Burl_ParksRec on Twitter for the latest updates and videos.
Roads, Parks and Forestry The administrative office will be closed on Friday, April 2 and Monday, April 5.
Essential services will be provided as required.

Residents can stay informed about City news at www.burlington.ca/coronavirus and our social media channels: @cityburlington on Twitter and facebook.com/cityburlington

 

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HDSB hosting Mental Health & Well-Being Information Sessions for Parents

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

March 29th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The strain from the restrictions on what we can and cannot do while we weather ourselves through this pandemic are beginning to show.

The warm weather is going to attract all kinds of outside activity – and dinner at an outdoor patio – but only with people in your household – who are probably the last people you want to dine with – you’ve been cooped up with them for months.

The Halton District School Board is hosting two Mental Health & Well-Being Information Sessions for Parents/Guardians on Monday, March 29 and Tuesday, March 30 at 7 p.m. at www.hdsb.ca.

talk to hs student

Tuesday, March 30 session will be for families with high school students

Discussion will include parent, child and youth mental health and well-being, ways in which parents/guardians can support their children, and resources available for youth and families. Each session will feature four panelists (parents, mental health experts, HDSB school social workers and community partners) who will share their experiences of parenting during COVID-19 and provide helpful information and resources.

The information session on Monday, March 29 will include information for parents/guardians of elementary students (Kindergarten – Grade 8) and the session on Tuesday, March 30 will include information for parents/guardians of secondary students (Grade 9 – 12).

These sessions will help parents/guardians learn about:

• How the pandemic may be impacting their, child’s, mental health and well-being
• Coping and well-being strategies for them and their children to support better mental health and well-being
• Resources and support available through their child’s school and within the community

Elementary Session: Monday, March 29 from 7 – 8:15 p.m. at www.hdsb.ca

Presenters:
• Noorie Soni, HDSB parent and PIC member
• Kim Menezes-Francispillai, School Social Worker, HDSB
• Shivani Patel, Lead, Access and System Navigation, Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK)
• Nathan Pillai, Clinical Psychologist, Bayridge Counselling Centre

Secondary Session: Tuesday, March 30 from 7 – 8:15 p.m. at www.hdsb.ca

Presenters:
• Darlene Wierski-Devoe, Parent and Program Supervisor, Halton Families for Families
• Melinda Dougan, School Social Worker, HDSB
• Shivani Patel, Lead, Access and System Navigation, Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK)
• Nicole Callander RSSW, Therapist, Bayridge Counselling Centre

Parent tlk to young

Session will have information for parents/guardians of elementary students (Kindergarten – Grade 8) and the session on Monday March 29th.

The sessions will be livestreamed through the HDSB YouTube channel. Parents/guardians can visit www.hdsb.ca at 7 p.m. on March 29 and/or March 30 to tune in. Registration is not required.

The HDSB is planning additional information sessions for parents/guardians on specific mental health & well-being topics to take place in the spring. The Board’s new Mental Health & Well-Being webpage has information for parents/guardians and students on mental health, ways to support positive mental health and well-being and how to get additional support at school and in the community.

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Wagering on a hockey game: tips to make it a safe experience: A Beginner’s Guide

sportsred 100x100By Hubert Harrison

March 26th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The world of NHL sports betting can be quite overwhelming for beginners. With the amount of betting strategies and lingo swirling around, it can be hard to keep up. Before you start looking into ice hockey betting tips and placing bets it’s important to get the basics down first. With money on the line, it’s important always important to bet smart

hockey goalie

It is an exciting game with some incredible athletes.

Online sports betting has become a fantastic activity for many sports fans today. With a bet involved, fans get to have a more engaging experience for every match they follow. Compared to just watching the latest NHL news live broadcasts, sports betting is a lot more exciting. It gives bettors the adrenaline rush as they watch their team win or lose.

Important Safety Betting Tips For Beginners

Betting mistakes happen. Even to the most seasoned of sports bettors. However, making errors is inevitable, there are a couple of ways to reduce them. In the world of online sports betting, it’s important to take things slow when learning the ropes of the trade. You need to learn how to bet smart to lead a successful betting career. To help guide you on to the path of sports betting success, keep on reading.

Keep things simple and clear

If you think you’ll be winning big from the get-go, think again. Online betting takes time and experience to master. Just like playing the piano, it’s impossible to master a piece on your first try. You’re going to need to practice over and over again to nail it.

Take things step-by-step.

The very first thing rookies need to keep in mind is to keep things simple and clear. In other words, participate in bets that you fully understand. Know where you’re placing your bets and their results. By not over complicating things, you’ll be able to make smart betting decisions and avoid the risk of burning a hole in your pocket.

Have a budget
While a chance at winning big sounds a whole more exciting than just a couple of bucks, it is incredibly risky. Especially when you lack the experience. One of the most important tips you need to always keep in mind no matter what is to always stay within your budget.

You need to always spend within your means. To keep control of your finances, set a specific budget that you can afford to lose. As a beginner, you are bound to make a few more mistakes than the average punter. So, be prepared to lose a great sum of your budget.

Do not trust just any tipster
Cyber attacks are all over the internet. As a beginner, it’s important to thoroughly look through different betting sites before trusting them. Here are some tips on how to find the right trustworthy tipsters:

Client reviews
Looking through online reviews is the best way to get the best idea of a betting site’s services and client experience.

paypal logoPayment methods
Have a look at the site’s payment methods. Check if they use popular payment platforms like Paypal or Apple Pay.

Terms and conditions
A tell-tale sign that a betting site is suspicious if they don’t have a terms and conditions page anywhere on their site. Make sure the site you’re about to trust has one.

Compare betting odds and lines
One of the best betting tips you need to take is always to compare betting odds and lines. Having good odds gives a big advantage in having a higher payout. On the other hand, having better betting lines will increase your chance of winning wagers.

Another way to increase your chances of winning is to have multiple accounts with different betting sites. By having several accounts in different betting platforms, you’ll be able to compare and find the best betting odds and lines right away.

NHL Betting Terms You Need To Know

After getting a good grasp on the important safety betting tips, it’s now time to know more about the type of sport you’ll be focusing on. NHL sports betting lingo can be rather confusing, especially when you’re just getting started. Here are a couple of important NHL sports betting lingo commonly used amongst bettors in the industry.

Hockey - two team players

Pick the team you think can win and place a wager.

Moneyline
Pick a team to win the game. It’s the simplest way to wager on.

Puck Line
To win, your team must score by more than 1.5 goals and the opposing team needs to lose by no more than 1.5 goals.

Parlay
Parlay is the act of combining two or more bet types from the same or across multiple games. It’s a good move to increase your total number of odds. But it can also be a risk as all plays need to be accurate.

Favorite
Refers to the home team or the team with the better record of the season.

Underdog
Refers to the visiting team or the team with the weaker record of the season.

Teaser
The act of buying or selling goals on a puck line or in a total bet. This move gives bettors better odds or chances of winning with lower odds.

NHL team crests

All kinds of teams to wager on.

Different Ways to Bet on the NHL
After a quick crash course of NHL lingo, the next thing you need to familiarize yourself with is the different types of bets in the NHL.

Live Betting
Betting while the game is in action. It’s the most action-packed way to bet on the NHL, you’ll be able to see lines adjusted in real-time.

Single-game Betting
This betting type is used when you’re only interested in betting on specific individuals broken down to a money line.

Prop Bets
Single-game bets based on players. Bettors can place bets whether a specific player scores or not, or even hit a certain record.

Futures Bet
Early bets are placed during the off-season or within the season by supporting a specific team to win a certain amount of games.

Experience is Gold
When it comes to online sports betting experience is the best teacher. It’s important to take risks and make mistakes. It’s how you learn how to do better the next time around. Understanding these basic terms and ways of how to place bets on the NHL will help give you a better grasp on where to get started. The best betting strategy is to take things one step at a time. Learn and grow with every win or loss you make.

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There are things to look forward to - once the majority is vaccinated and safe distances have been maintained

eventspink 100x100By Tom Geens

March 25th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Lift your eyes to the future – and the all-Canadian pursuits we can look forward to over the coming months.

By anyone’s standards, the last year has been extremely tough. Leaving aside the direct human suffering inflicted by COVID-19, the pandemic has also ground society to a halt, with lockdown measures meaning that so many of our favourite pastimes have either been put on hold altogether or severely curtailed.

Things are going to stay tough for a little while yet. But at least now, with the prospect of a vaccine-led recovery strengthening every day, it feels like we can finally lift our eyes to the future and the promise of a return to normality.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of Ontarians’ favourite all-Canadian pursuits – the things that we’ve been missing dearly, and that enrich our local and national life so much. Something to whet the appetite as we look forward to brighter days ahead.

PAID hockey Toronto

Hockey is the national sport – watched at both the professional and local levels.

Watching hockey

Our biggest national sport, over 1.3 million Canadians actively participate in recreational hockey games, and as much as 68% of the population watched the 2018 NHL playoffs. This is a sport deeply ingrained in our national psyche.

Yet in recent months, there have been COVID-19 outbreaks traced to hockey arenas all over the US and Canada, meaning that spectators are not being allowed into stadiums to watch their favourite pro teams play. However, a vaccine-led recovery raises the prospect of Ontarians returning to the stands in the not-too-distant future, watching their favourite players while gobbling down hotdogs, ice cream and beer.

Playing rugby again with our friends

We might not be the world’s most famous rugby nation – that accolade probably goes to New Zealand – but we still love the sport.

wer

In Burlington the local Rugby Clubs take part in events, including the annual Christmas parade.

It was introduced to this country by the Royal Navy back in 1823, and we now have domestic tournaments such as the Canadian Rugby Championship and we participate in continental matches such as the Americas Rugby Championship.

With Rugby Ontario announcing that rugby clubs in certain parts of the province are allowed to start playing again, it feels exciting to be returning to the rucks and scrums of this fiercely competitive sport and using up some of that excess energy that we’ve all been storing up from months spent indoors.

Enjoying galleries and our world-beating culture

What have you been doing to pass the time during stay-at-home measures? A decent novel always helps. Netflix may offer some entertainment. There’s also the world of online casinos – sites such as this one offer plenty of online games, chances to win money, and safety measures to ensure that you can keep track of what it is you’re spending. For as long as the economy remains at least partially closed, indoor pursuits like this may help to keep you sane.

AGB live auction - closer look

Patron looking at painting being auctioned.

However, we’re all craving a bit of culture – Canada is famous for it, after all – and our very own Burlington Art Gallery has re-opened its doors.  With its range of exhibits, including a prominent collection of Canadian ceramics, and free access for visitors, this is definitely a great day out for the family.

Further afield, in the cultural mecca of Toronto, just over 40 minutes’ drive away, the Art Gallery of Ontario also remains closed – though an excellent array of virtual courses and activities remain available. For example, artist instructor Amanda Arcuri is running an online series called ‘Drawing Larger Than Life’.

Elsewhere, the world-famous Toronto Symphony Orchestra has posted an update on its website saying that it hopes to be able to share further details about its 2021/22 schedule by late spring or early summer.

Running your model boats at Centennial Pond

Skating at the Centennial Pond is over the for season.  Soon the water will be ready for those model boats that scoot around at a feverish clip.

Everyone is looking forward to the point where the majority of people will have been vaccinated and we will be able to get out to wine and dine and maybe event get to a movie.  Too early to tell – but that is the hope – assuming we all maintain that two metre safe distance and wear masks.

Drinking craft beer in our enviable array of bars

The humble glass of beer. In a bar. With your friends. Surely, few simple pleasures are being missed quite as much as this one, with venues across Ontario still shuttered due to the pandemic.

However, we can find solace in the fact that our enviable craft beer culture will come back with a bang when lockdown does finally end – and Toronto’s craft scene and brewers, in particular, give us hope that one day soon, we’ll be experimenting with all manner of flavorful ales.

Places such as Bandit Brewery, with its devilishly good bar snacks and quirky beer selection, is just one of the establishments that we’ll be hoping to get back into soon.

beer guy

The Beer Guy will deliver the suds to your door while you watch the hockey game.

Until then, be sure to check out companies such as The Beer Guy in Burlington, and the range of local breweries offering deliveries of kegs and bottles to people’s front doors.

We’re so lucky to live in Ontario – our proximity to big cities, big culture and world-beating nature means that we’re well-placed to enjoy the economic and social recovery from COVID-19 when it finally sets in.

Until then, we’ll have to make the most of the activities that we’re still allowed to do under restrictions and meditate on the prospect of better days ahead.

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Spring break and PA Day programs open for registration on March 26

eventspink 100x100By Staff

March 23rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City’s spring break programming, which includes Youth Camp and Student Theatre Camp, and PA Day programming will be open for registration at burlington.ca/schoolbreaks on March 26, 2021, at 11 a.m.

Programs are available for viewing now.

students distant standing

Students will be able to be outside but programs will be much different this Spring Break.

Youth Camp and PA Day programming will take place at Tansley Woods Community Centre, 1996 Itabashi Way.

Student Theatre Camp will take place at Burlington Student Theatre, 2131 Prospect St.

If residents have questions about programs or need help with registering, contact the City by email at liveandplay@burlington.ca, or if you need to speak to someone, call 905-335-7738, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekends.

Recreation Fee Assistance

Recreation is for all, regardless of financial situation. Recreation Fee Assistance is funding made available to resident individuals or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreation programs.

For more information or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance. You can also leave a confidential voicemail message at 905-335-7738, ext. 8501 and staff will return your call to assist you.

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture explains that while: “Programs may look different we have designed them to still offer the highest quality programming, staff and participant safety and a wide range of fun and exciting activities.

“Kids will love the programs and parents can feel confident their child is not only safe, but having fun, too.”

Links and Resources
www.burlington.ca/schoolbreaks

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In-progress contemporary dance works done by some of the very best - well worth your time

eventspink 100x100By Staff

March 12th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Aeris Körper has announced the eighth edition of PROSPECTS: an evening of dance and discussion.

FORM two dancers - one masked

The work this group does is almost theatre.

PROSPECTS brings together local enthusiasts of art and dance with choreographers from the local, regional and international dance community to cultivate creative community dialogue.

I call what Aeris does “progressive dance”.  They take huge risks with the dance art form – at times what you see will take your breath away.

Audience members will witness new and in-progress contemporary dance works whose themes will provide the foundation for the evening’s dialogue.

Each work will be followed by a Q&A discussion led by each choreographer, giving the audience an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and further examine the ideas presented. There will also be an opportunity to provide written feedback.

“This interactive, informal event brings together community members to share ideas, to learn about contemporary dance and to bring life to the local arts in Burlington,” said Lisa Emmons, Artistic Director.

Dance 1

On many of the performances you can feel the tension and the expression in the work.

Choreographers:
Elena Vazintaris
Emily Williams
Eric Dahlinger
Shreya Bollywood Dance
Thea Sachade

Tickets:
Can be reserved at eventbrite: https://bit.ly/3bpZ1VS

Event Details:
Thursday, March 25th, 2021
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Aeris Körper Zoom Room

Many thanks to the City of Burlington Arts and Culture Fund grant and Canadian Heritage for their ongoing support.

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Those clocks Spring Forward - make the change on Sunday

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

Clocks - forwardDaylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 14, 2021, at 2:00 A.M.

The practice in many communities is to change the batteries in the smoke alarms and to adjust the clocks.

Homeowners:
As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to install and maintain smoke alarms on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas.

Landlords:
As a landlord, it is your responsibility to ensure your rental properties comply with this law.

Tenants/Renters:
If you are a tenant of a rental property and do not have the required number of smoke alarms, contact your landlord immediately. It is against the law for tenants to remove the batteries or tamper with the smoke alarms in any way.

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Big Sound coming from BPAC and the SoM people - virtual performance - put a little life in the city

News 100 yellowBy Staff

March 10th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Is it too much to hope for a small live event that gets identified as The Sound of Music?

The Performing Arts Centre is clearing a path – they are the venue for a virtual event that will feature Monster Truck with Helix The Band – they want to build up a storm at the Burlington Performing Arts Centre (BPAC) stage on March 27.

BPAC event - month end

Hook up great speakers to the lap top and let it blast. Virtual but real.

Until live audiences return, you can be there virtually to rock and roll.

VIP Livestream Passes and Regular Livestream tickets on sale today at 12:00pm at https://burlingtonpac.ca/events/monster-truck/

*This is a virtual event only, however the ticket system will ask you to ‘select a seat’ – this is only arbitrary for the purpose of counting tickets in the system.*

VIP Livestream Passes include: ticket to the show, autographed Monster Truck limited edition poster, Sound of Music T-shirt, virtual meet & greet with the band, chance to win an autographed Monster Truck guitar, and a $25 gift card to a local restaurant.

Heck, with all that booty – why didn’t they throw in lunch as well?

.

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Museum plans an Easter Egg Hunt - passport and popcorn part of the offer

eventsred 100x100By Staff

March 10th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Brant Museum has come up with something that will get the kids outdoors.

They are calling it an Around the Town Easter Egg Hunt: a chance to explore and learn about some of Burlington’s most notable heritage sites on an Easter egg hunt around the city.

Easter egg hunt April

Your ticket includes an Egg Hunt passport, Easter popcorn, and supplies for Easter crafts that will be led through virtual instruction. Ideal for children ages 6 – 12 years old.

Tickets are $10 per child. Easter packages will be available for pick-up at Joseph Brant Museum from Tuesday, March 30th to Thursday, April 1st between 10am – 3pm.

A mention of why we celebrate Easter would have been nice. The 6-12 age group should understand the Christian part of our Christian Judaeo fundamentals.

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Rink at Centennial Pond closed

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

March 9th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If you didn't get to strap on the blades this winter - you're out of luck. Rink closes at 10:00 pm this evening.

If you didn’t get to strap on the blades this winter – you’re out of luck. Rink now closed.

The Burlington Rotary Centennial Pond is now closed for the season due to the warm weather.

There are still opportunities to skate outdoors at the outdoor artificial surface at Hidden Valley Park (1137 Hidden Valley Rd.).

Register at burlington.ca/dropinandplay.

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Parks and Recreation program registration opens March 13th

News 100 yellowBy Staff

March 7th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Someone believes there is going to be a Spring followed by a Summer during which the city Parks and Recreation department will offer the best program it can and still abide by whatever COVID19 conditions are in place.

Registration for spring recreation programming opens March 13

Spring programs can be viewed now at burlington.ca/recreation.

Burlington residents can register for in-person, outdoor and virtual programs for Adults 19+, Adults 55+ on March 13 at 9 a.m. Registration for Youth programs will happen at 11 a.m. on March 13.

Pks and Rec registration
An account is required to register online. You can create an account or register at liveandplay.burlington.ca.

Residents can call 905-335-7738 for staff-assisted telephone registrations.

Anyone with questions or needing assistance can contact the Recreation, Community and Culture Department by email live&play@burlington.ca or if you need to speak to someone, call 905-335-7738 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekends.

Haber - basketball

Everyone can’t wait until the COVID19 crisis is behind us. Gyms and play fields that have been closed will burst with activity. Can’t wait.

If restrictions change due to the pandemic, we will do our best to adjust and modify the program.
Safety requirements are in place for all programs and include Bring Your Own everything, and the requirement for masks for all non-physically active programs.

Anyone participating in an in-person program will need to fill out the mandatory health screening form at burlington.ca/screening before each session.

Outdoor programs will require participants to dress for conditions and will run rain or shine. Cancellations due to extreme weather conditions of thunder, lightning or high-winds or in the case of unforeseen staff absence will result in credits to affected customers.

Recreation Fee Assistance
Recreation is for all, regardless of financial situation. Recreation Fee Assistance is funding made available to resident individuals or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreation programs.

For more information or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance. You can also leave a confidential voicemail message at 905-335-7738, ext. 8501 and staff will return your call to assist you.

Chris Glenn

Director of Recreation, Community and Culture, Chris Glenn

Chris Glenn, Director of Recreation, Community and Culture has said he is “ taking a cautious, phased-in approach to re-opening our recreation facilities. We want to welcome everyone back but we’re doing it with an abundance of caution to ensure staff and participants remain safe and have confidence in our safety procedures.

“Many of our programs for the spring will take place outside, too. For those who still want to enjoy our virtual programs, we still have our Active-at-Home videos and TelePALS running. Keep checking the website as we are adding more programming frequently.”

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