Residential and condominium sales still hot with some startling sales figures.

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 17th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Rocca Sisters,  in their regular newsletter, report that residential sales were up 40.7%, sale prices were up 21.1% and days on market were down 48% on average as compared to February 2020.

The average price of a freehold property at the end of February was $1,210,336. Year to date, the average price of a freehold property was sitting at $1,244,466 as compared to $1,002,193 at the end of February, 2020, up 24.2%.

Inventory levels at the end of February were down just under 50% as compared to the end of February 2020. At the end of February 2017, again, the hottest real estate market on record up until now, inventory sat at 154 compared to 2021 at 102.

During the month of February, of the 211 sales, 36 of them sold for under the asking price.

Properties sold for, on average, 110.44% of the asking price. Some truly remarkable and difficult to explain sales included yet another one on Penn Drive – a nicely maintained, 1699 sq. ft. side-split on an 80 x 150 lot was listed for $1,289,000 – sold for $1,652,000.

A 1650 sq. ft. nicely updated two storey with a single car garage on Riley Ave in the Palmer neighbourhood was listed at $929,900 – sold for $1,207,000.

In Brant Hills we saw a property that backed onto the 407 list at $999,500 sell for $1,300,000 – it was partially updated and had an in-ground pool. Finally, the most startling sale of all involved an 1125 sq. ft. bungalow on a 75×150 lot, a stone’s throw away from the train tracks near the Aldershot Go Station. Hard to say what the house was like as there were no interior photos – suggesting it was a fixer/upper opportunity. Listed at $769,000 (which seemed a little on the high side), sold for $1,131,000 – 47% over the asking price.

The numbers tell the residential story:
rocca resid feb 2021

The condominium market sale prices during the month of February rose to $567,000, up 10%, sales were up 13%, price per square foot reached $624, up over 22% as compared to February 2020.

Condos sold for 102.16% of the listing price and in 22 days, on average. Inventory levels have rocketed to a 10 year low with only 31 active units at the end of February. For the first time, we saw several condos sell for more than 20% of the listed price.

The state of the condominium market:

rocco condo sales Feb 2021

Return to the Front page

Resident has nothing but good words for vaccination process

News 100 yellowBy Staff

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Here is how it works.

A resident from the Tyandaga area had a vaccination appointment. When it comes to being critical and direct – he is amongst the best.

His experience in getting vaccinated follows…

Vax 1 change

A change in the second dose appointment date is handed out.

I arrived at the vaccination station and security asked my name and designated vaccination time. They checked a list for validation.

I was 30 minutes early and was asked to return in 15 minutes (they did ask if I came by car and could wait in it) since it appeared that there was no real waiting area available inside the building (probably to avoid ‘crowding’).

After Security at the front door, I was then asked by Halton Staff to show my health card.

They then led me to the vaccination hall. Here there were three rows (A, B, C) each row containing 10 chairs (5 chairs side-by-side) in the row – all the chairs were separated by at least 6 feet.

On each chair was the literature that I have attached.

Each row of 5 was serviced by a Vaccination giver and an assistant. They went from client to client in their designated row (back and forth).

Before the vaccination, a number of questions were asked mostly to do with medication currently taken and any allergic reactions to specific medication.

If all was OK, then they gave you the shot of Phizer mRNA vaccine (make sure you have a short-sleeved shirt / vest on!).

After the vaccination, you were given a time that you could leave the vaccination area – 15 minutes from the time of the vaccination.

On leaving you were directed to the exit and again met by Halton staff who presented you with a Ministry of Heath certification of your vaccination and also the time and date of your second dose (note: this has been extended from 3 weeks to 4 months in order to give more people their first dose.)

Note: NO photos were permitted in the vaccination hall and this was strictly yet politely enforced. There also seemed to be security cameras scanning the whole operation

This was a very well organized operation with pleasant and helpful staff and the whole procedure from start to finish took approximately 30 minutes.

In fact, in my experience, from the initial registration phone call to the actual Pfizer ‘jab’ Halton should be complimented at their efficiency of delivery.

Vax 3 correct

Vax 2 what to do

 

Return to the Front page

Halton Police Investigate Series of Pharmacy Robberies

Crime 100By Staff

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) are investigating a series of pharmacy robberies that police believe to be connected.

On February 15, 2021, at approximately 3:55 pm three males entered Halton Pharmacy on Speers Road in Oakville and demanded the pharmacist turnover narcotics from the safe. After stealing the drugs, the suspects fled the area in an SUV. No weapons were seen or mentioned and no physical injuries were sustained.

Alton IDA

No one physically injured during the incident at this location.

On February 19, 2021, at approximately 5:15 pm three males entered IDA Pharmacy and Alton Village Medical Clinic on Thomas Alton Boulevard in Burlington and demanded the pharmacist turnover narcotics. They were unsuccessful in obtaining any drugs however they did steal cash from the register. They fled the area in an SUV. The suspects indicated they were armed, but no weapons were observed. Nobody was physically injured during the incident.

On March 14, 2021, at approximately 7:05 pm four males entered Rexall Pharma Plus on Lakeshore Road West in Oakville. They again targeted narcotics from the safe and were able to steal a quantity of prescription drugs and cash. On this occasion, one of the suspects was armed with a kitchen knife. They fled the area in a sedan.  Two victims suffered minor physical injuries during this robbery.

In each incident the suspects have been wearing masks however they appear to be between 16-22 years of age.

Police want to remind the public of the following safety tips:

  • Always be vigilant of your surroundings
  • If you find yourself present during a robbery, remain calm. Do not argue with the robbers or attempt to disarm them
  • Try and note/remember as many details as possible
  • Do not touch or move anything discarded or left behind by the robbers
  • Once safe to do so, call 911 and remain at the scene until police arrive

Crime stoppers logoAnyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to contact Detective Barry Malciw of the 2 District Criminal Investigations Bureau at 905-825-4777 ext. 2218.

Police would also be interested in any dash cam footage residents may have of the suspects and their vehicles in the area and time of the robberies.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers. “See something? Hear something? Know something? Contact Crime Stoppers” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.

Return to the Front page

How did the guys who know how to communicate when they are running for office - fail to communicate when their public is frightened

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

How did this get so screwed up?

The province had months to create a web site that people would use to register for a Covid19 vaccination.

They day they opened it up – it failed.  They appear to have fixed it.

HillierOn the same day the retired Army General who was overseeing the distribution of the vaccines in the province quits.  Maybe the $20,000 a month he was being paid (this on top of an Armed Forces pension) wasn’t enough.  Or maybe he stood back and saw nothing but a disaster on its way and chose to step aside.  Question – did he get vaccinated before he quit?

There are very legitimate concerns about one of the vaccines; the AstraZeneca vaccine is reported to have resulted in blood clots in some people.

The Prime Minister assures us that the batch that had the problems is not the batch of vaccines that we are using in Canada.  Do you feel assured?  I don’t.

Remember the thalidomide tragedy; those poor souls only recently got acceptable support and compensation.

For those who don’t recognize the word thalidomide it was a pharmaceutical that was prescribed for pregnant women. Far too many gave birth to children with no arms – just stubs instead of a fully formed arm.

Tragedies like this happen when governments fail to do the job the public expects.  There is good reason to ask if the same kind of incompetence, let’s be candid and call it what it is – stupidity, is happening to us now.

We have failed terribly to ensure that we would have access to the vaccines the government should have known would be needed.

The buck on situations like this rests at the very top.

Instead all we are getting from the leadership at the federal and provincial levels are bromides – people are beginning to become frightened; the last thing we need is a public that no longer trusts and begins to do what human beings do – look out for their own interests.

The best source of the news and information people need in Burlington comes from the Regional level – The Public Health Unit for Halton struggled like everyone else at the beginning to get organized.

When this is all over hopefully there will be an opportunity to tell the full story about the job these people have done.

In the meantime, we wait.  There is more that can be done.  Governments react to protest – if you are worried,  scream blue murder and let the leadership at the federal and provincial levels know that what they are doing is just not good enough.

There have been a few examples of superb leadership – try naming one.

Elections will take place in the not too distant future.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

Return to the Front page

Bureaucracy run amok

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

Our apologies to the City Communications department.  The provenance of the article was attributed to the city.  That was incorrect.

The following was released this morning by the Mayor’s Covid19 Task Force.

 

The Burlington COVID-19 Task Force has been created to help support our community through this unprecedented emergency.

Purpose
The Task Force will share information and mobilize community and agency resources to support our hospital and healthcare workers as we prepare for an anticipated surge of patients in the coming days and weeks and work through a recovery period, as well as coordinate our broader community efforts on COVID-19. Members will bring information and/or requests for assistance back to each of their own organizations and emergency response tables.

While this information-sharing and collaboration is already happening, the Task Force simply formalizes this effort and adds some structure as we collectively serve our community.

Membership
Membership includes community leaders and decision-makers representing various organizations and agencies involved in the COVID-19 response. New members may be added as the situation evolves. Each participant is likely to be a member of their own organization’s COVID-19 response group, with an ability to bring information from that table, where appropriate, to the Task Force, and vice versa.

Invitees are similar to the panelists on the Mayor’s recent public telephone town hall. Community response to that event was overwhelmingly positive, with residents specifically mentioning that they appreciated the assembled panel of cross-functional experts and leaders, and seeing the evidence of collaboration, sharing of information and coordinating of efforts to serve them.

meeting table

A table this size could not hold the Burlington Covid19 Task Force. Fortunately they meet virtually – more fortunate – many of them don’t show up.

Invited guests/organizations at this time:
Chair, Mayor Marianne Meed Ward
City of Burlington Emergency Control Group:
Burlington Fire Department:  Karen Roche, Deputy Fire Chief
Amber Rushton, Business Continuity and Emergency Planning CEMC
Dan VanderLelie, President, Burlington Professional Firefighters Association
City of Burlington: o Tim Commisso, City Manager,  Allan Magi, Executive Director of Environment, Infrastructure and Community Services,  Sandy O’Reilly, Controller and Manager of Financial Services.

City Council:
Ward 2 Councillor and Joseph Brant Hospital Board Member, Lisa Kearns
Ward 6 Councillor, business owner and past hospital fundraiser, Angelo Bentivegna
Joseph Brant Hospital: o Eric Vandewall, CEO and President,  Dr. Dale Kalina, Medical Director of Infectious Disease
Halton Regional Police Service:  Roger Wilkie, Deputy Chief of Police,  Superintendent Anthony Odoardi
Halton District School Board:  Stuart Miller, Director of Education
Halton Catholic District School Board , Pat Daly, Director of Education
Halton Region:  Lynne Simons, Senior Advisor to the CAO
Members of Parliament:  The Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of International Development, MP, Burlington
Pam Damoff, MP, Oakville-North Burlington,  Adam Van Koeverden, MP, Milton
Members of Provincial Parliament
Jane McKenna, MPP, Burlington,  Effie Triantafilopoulos, MPP, Oakville-North Burlington,  Parm Gill, MPP, Milton
TEAM Burlington:   Carla Nell, Burlington Chamber of Commerce,  Anita Cassidy, Burlington Economic Development,  Pam Belgrade, Tourism Burlington,  Brian Dean, Burlington Downtown Business Association,  Judy Worsley, Aldershot Business Improvement Area
Lita Barrie, CEO, Burlington Public Library
United Way Halton & Hamilton, Halton Poverty Roundtable,  Tyler Moon, Senior Manager, Community Impact
The Burlington Food Bank:  Robin Bailey, Executive Director
Burlington Hydro: o Gerry Smallegange, President & CEO
Reach Out Centre for Kids:  Kirsten Dougherty, Chief Executive Officer
Royal Hamilton Light Infantry:  Lieutenant Colonel and Commanding Officer Alex Colic
Diocese of Hamilton:  Rev. Rob Thomas, Chaplain, Burlington Fire Department
Halton Islamic Association,  Sr. Osob
NUVO Network, o Bridget and Shawn Saulnier, Owners
Burlington Foundation: o Colleen Mulholland, President and CEO
Food for Life,  Graham Hill, Executive Director

Meetings
Meetings are expected to be one hour weekly, or more often as necessary, by teleconference chaired by the Mayor. With this large of a group, sometimes full attendance will not be possible. We will plan to send out a summary of each call the next day to all members, as well as post highlights here for the public to read.

Action Items and Meeting Minutes
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #19 – March 15, 2021 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #18 – Feb. 22, 2021 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #17 – Jan. 26, 2021 [PDF]
2020 Action Items and Meeting Minutes
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #16 – Dec. 3, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #15 – Oct. 29, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #14 – Oct. 1, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #13 – Aug. 26, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #12 – July 16, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #11 – June 25, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #10 – June 18, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #9 – June 4, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #8 – May 28, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #7 – May 21, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #6 – May 15, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #5 – May 7, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #4 – April 30, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #3 – April 23, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #2 – April 16, 2020 [PDF]
• Burlington COVID-19 Task Force Meeting #1 – April 7, 2020 [PDF]

This is the media release the city distributed. This is bureaucracy run amok

Return to the Front page

When do I get vaccinated?

opiniongreen 100x100By Jan Mowbray

March 16th, 2021

MILTON, ON

 

I have a real problem regarding the dearth of information available with regard to vaccinations.

Living in Halton, specifically Milton, my friends and I are exhorted to visit the Halton Region website for vaccination information, which I have done several times now.  It’s been time wasted so far.  The only information there pertains to the 80+ crowd and while I would never wish to deny the group early dibs at the vaccine – God and everyone else knows how hard this pandemic has been on seniors – where am I in the picture?

covid needle 2But what about the 70 plus group, which is where I am?  Why is there no reference at all on the Region’s website for the rest of us – the +70s, the 60’s etc.?  Even a vague mention that you have our backs would be encouraging, that you know we’re here and waiting, with increasing impatience.

In Toronto, they’ve gone from vaccination information for the 80+ group, front line workers, and many others.  No mention of the 70+ cohort but I’ve seen quite a bit of information for the 60+ to get their shots.

All very good for those living in Toronto but meanwhile, back here in Halton, how about information for vaccinations for those below 80?

I got a Tweet today from one of our regional councilors telling me to visit the Halton website for vaccination information.  Thanks, Mike, been there, done that. I’m no more aware than I was before your Tweet.  Not happy. I just want some, ANY, information.

werv

Jan Mowbray was a member of the Town of Milton council for two terms

 

Return to the Front page

Who can get vaccinated now - how do they register.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Who can get vaccinated now – how do they register?

It is a little on the confusing side when you try to register for a vaccination.

The province opened up its web site yesterday – it didn’t work all that well – but they appear to have solved the problems.

So – if you live in Burlington, or anywhere in the Region, and you are using the provincial web site to make a vaccination appointment that web site will push you over to the Regional site which has worked very well from the day they opened it up.

Biggest concern is – who can register.

Those over 80.

Those working in the medical field – and they all go to the Oakville Trafalgar Hospital.

Those in long term care housing have been taken care of.  The Region went to extraordinary effort to ensure those people were vaccinated.  They had mobile units that went to each location.

The rest of us have to wait until the medical people know that they have vaccines in stock and that they can meet the demand.  Then, and only then will things open up for vaccination registrations.

Roll out plan Mar 16

 

 

There is a lot of data on the Regional web site. The link to that web site is HERE

We are going to have to learn to be patient and we must continue to follow the rules.

Six feet apart – wear the mask.  If you have to get out of the house and have dinner with people – make sure you are dining with people that you live with.  Yes that does limit things – the objective is to prevent the spread of a virus that is proving to be quite a bit smarter than anyone expected.

 

 

Return to the Front page

What the data tells us: It isn't a pretty picture

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 16th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

With people now being able to register on line for a vaccination appointment and actual vaccinations taking place it is useful to look at the data the Regional Public Health unit has put together.

The data from a Regional perspective:

PHU data Mar 15 Region

The variant versions of the virus are the huge concern. They are proving to be more deadly than the first version of the virus and they spread much faster.

 

 

 

The data from a Burlington perspective:

PHU data March 15 Burl

The number of variant cases is low – but these variants travel very very quickly. Reports are that we are now into a third wave..

The data that related directly to Burlington. There are variant versions of the virus in the community.

There is a desperate race to get people vaccinated before the variant versions of the virus spread.

Related news stories:

Medical Officer of  Health concerned about variant version of the virus

Return to the Front page

Burlington Foundation sends 4th round of grants totaling $146,000 to community groups

graphic community 5By Staff

March 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington Foundation last week announced the charities that will receive $146,000 from Phase 4 granting from the Covid-19 Pandemic Response Fund, since the Foundation announced the fund on March 31, 2020.

The Pandemic Response Fund was established to support community-based relief efforts through four phases of granting that has taken place since early 2020. With these new grant awards, the Foundation’s Pandemic Response Fund has provided over $453,000 in grant relief to assist charities in their response efforts recognizing that this pandemic will have long-term implications for the non-profit sector.

“With the second wave of Covid-19 striking our community and driving even more demand for emergency relief, we are very pleased to provide Phase 4 funding of $146,000 to 26 local charities who are working tirelessly to help our community’s most vulnerable citizens during this time of ongoing need,” says Colleen Mulholland, President and CEO of Burlington Foundation.

Compassion

Aliya Khawari, Executive Director, Compassion Society of Halton

The Compassion Society of Halton received $7,000 in funding. Aliya Khawari, Executive Director, shares, “We are so grateful for the generous funding from the Burlington Foundation for Covid emergency response.

The Compassion Society has been able to provide all the care and basic needs for many who have been deeply impacted by the ongoing pandemic. With mental health issues on the rise and anxiety levels in red due to social isolation and curbing of many social services – accessing food, hygiene and self-care items, clothing and other basic needs should be the last thing for people to worry about.”

The ongoing pandemic also continues to present connectivity challenges for people living with developmental disability. Community Living Burlington received $7,000 to enable the organization to continue providing virtual opportunities and meaningful connections. “Community Living Burlington is incredibly grateful for the support from the Burlington Foundation. During these challenging times, our agency goal is to ensure the people we support still feel connected to their community, and this funding will help us ensure that people will continue to thrive during this pandemic,” says Emily Huang, Senior Manager, Community and Resource Development.

Providing these critical emergency grants in this time of tremendous need would not be possible without the kindness of donors. Our heartfelt thank you to our many donors including: The Paletta Family, Pioneer Energy, Randy and Denise Reeve Family Fund, Milne Family Foundation Fund, Pieczonka Family Foundation Fund, LKH Spirit Fund, BDO Burlington Community Fund, Dalton Timmis Group Fund, and several community donors.

About Burlington Foundation
BCF logoBurlington Foundation is a registered charity with over 20 years of experience helping people accomplish their charitable goals and address our city’s most pressing needs. As one of 191 community foundations across Canada, we are dedicated to having a significant impact in Burlington by building legacy endowment funds, providing vital charitable grants, and bringing people together to address important community issues such as flood relief, mental health and now the global Covid- 19 pandemic.

Return to the Front page

Grieving is not something you need to do alone - there is help

graphic community 4By Pepper Parr

March 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Grief is a part of life.

Grief 1We live in a world where for the most part there are family and friends to see you through the grief that has come into your life.

We survive and become better people, wiser people and more appreciative of what we have.

That has changed hasn’t it?

We normally attend funerals for people we knew well, admired, worked with, and will miss. We have not been able to do that, meaning one of the tools we use to come to terms with the grief we are experiencing is no longer there for us to use.

Frank and Doreen Kelly are leading a 13 week course on managing grief that will be held at Glad Tiding Pentecostal Church.

The next 13 week class starts May 5.  The meetings will run from 7:00p.m. -9:00p.m .

grief 2Registration is free – the program will take place on line.

The team has held three sessions and is ready to take registrations for the fourth session of 13 weeks that will start in May

You can register HERE.

When you get to the site you select Burlington as the location and then select Glad Tidings Church.

The course is free – there is a nominal cost for a Workbook.

The sessions at this point in time are done via Zoom.  The Kellys are part of the Glad Tidings Church in Burlington who are supporting this initiative.

Return to the Front page

Resident asks: have we lost the ability to hope and see a better time ahead.

graphic community 4By Blair Smith 

March 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The pandemic has affected virtually every person on the planet. It has disrupted business, affected all levels and means of social interaction, put accepted norms of behaviour under serious scrutiny, challenged our concepts of family and friends and required everyone to adopt coping mechanisms just to get up and start another day. And perhaps what has suffered most is that which is most necessary for our survival – our ability to hope and see a better time ahead.

Tree Hope tree

It was not really a Christmas tree any longer but a ‘tree of hope.

On a small court in north Burlington, in a well treed and older neighbourhood there is a rather quirky but harmless symbol of one family’s expectations of better times to come – a Christmas tree that has been in place and lit since the pandemic struck almost a year ago. Truthfully, the tree is always slow to come down and be put away. It usually can be seen in the large front window until Easter. It is one of those eccentric expressions of personality that make life just a little more interesting.

And now, for the two retired and disabled seniors who remain in the house, it has become a tree of hope and will stand erect and lit until this pandemic has finally run its course and life returns to a ‘new normal’.

Unfortunately, our capacity for toleration and our ability to appreciate the unconventional seems to have been seriously undermined as Covid-19 strains both our perspectives and our basic decency. Yesterday, the family received a phone call mid-afternoon from a woman who, unidentified, began with an abrupt “You have a Christmas tree in your window”. Somewhat taken aback, they responded with “yes, we do” and were quickly met with “and you have had it there since at least last summer”.

They admitted that this was so and explained that it was not really a Christmas tree any longer but a ‘tree of hope’, a symbol of better times and that it would stay in place until the pandemic finally ends. The angel that would normally crown the tree has been replaced by a butterfly, pointing to regeneration and renewal.

The response was a sarcastic “well that’s absolutely ridiculous! We have a house to sell!” and the caller hung up. And indeed, one of the houses on the court, now empty, has been the focus of a great deal of activity over the past two weeks as professional cleaners and organizers worked to make the house ready for viewing. Was the caller associated with the Realtor? Was she a member of the seller’s family? I doubt the latter as the family are very decent people and have always respected their neighbours and community. Attempts to call back the number met with no success and, frankly, there would be little profit in speaking to whomever made the call anyways.

They simply wouldn’t “get it”.

The first thing that the pandemic took from us was our freedom of movement and often the companionship of our friends and family. As serious as these constraints have been they will also eventually end. However, the emotional isolation that has also been the product of the pandemic, the loss of intimacy and empathy that comes with physical separation may be far longer lasting and far more damaging.

Return to the Front page

National Advisory body needs volunteers to sit on Canada’s Volunteer Awards Committee

News 100 yellowBy Staff

March 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We all play a role in recognizing Canada’s volunteers.

Great volunteers come from everywhere.

Until April 8, 2021, Canada’s Volunteer Awards (CVA) will be accepting applications for its National Advisory Committee (NAC).

Members of the National Advisory Committee play a leading role in the selection of Canada’s Volunteer Awards recipients by reviewing nominations and making recommendations to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development. They also support the promotion of the program throughout their term.

volunteers cleaning up

Volunteers sweep the boardwalk after Hurricane Sandy

The committee consists of 15 volunteer members from across Canada who are passionate about volunteering. They are selected based on their knowledge and experience working or volunteering in support of community development. Additionally, members reflect Canada’s diversity and serve for a term of three years. If you have experience in one of the following sectors, you might have what the committee needs:

a not-for-profit organization
the charitable sector
the health sector
the social services sector
a service provider
the private sector, or
a municipality.

Employment and Social Development Canada is accepting applications until April 8, 2021. If you want to learn more about this opportunity or to apply, CLICK HERE

Return to the Front page

Burlington MP Karina Gould in conversation with Ancilla Ho-Young

graphic community 3By Pepper Parr

March 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

I was looking for a way to close out a week in which we celebrated women.

A colleague sent me a link to a Facebook page that had Burlington MP Karina Gould talking to Ancilla Ho-Young, and the work she has done from the day she arrived in Canada in 1970.

Her first job was as a nurse at the Joseph Brant Hospital – it turned out to be her only job. During the 40 years she worked as a nurse she broke a lot of barriers and did a lot of pioneering work.

It was a treat, a real treat, to listen to Ancilla talk about the trials she experienced as a woman of colour. She saw it all and experienced much of it – some of it is still taking place, as she noted during a virtual conversation with MP Gould.

Ancilla + Gould

Ancilla Ho Young in a virtual conversation with Burlington MP Karina Gould

The last ten years of her career at Joseph Brant Hospital were spent as the lead in the sexual assault victims unit where she put in a full shift each day and was on the phone many evenings making sure that a victim who walked into emergency didn’t get shipped off to some other institution.

Ancilla developed strong working relationships with the police, which she still maintains.
She is one of these people you have to meet and experience. More often than not, at least in my experience, she would look at you with one eyebrow raised – and that sort of yeah? look on her face.

Ancilla Ho-Young was not a woman to trifle with.

Firm in her responses, which she will tell you “got me in trouble sometimes” she adds that, “There is still quite a bit of racism in Burlington but it has changed” remembering “there were times when I would be followed in a store by people thinking I was going to steal something”.

Retirement wasn’t an opportunity to do a little less – the week it became known that she had retired, the invitations to sit on different boards came flooding in.

Karina Gould asked Ancilla how she handled the transition from being a nurse with front line responsibilities within an organization that had both structure and hierarchy to being to be an activist and now able to put her views, beliefs and convictions into practice at a grass roots level.

A deep smile comes across her face as she respond “there is more work to be done”.

Return to the Front page

City reminds public that we are into salamander mating season

News 100 greenBy Staff

March 11th, 2012

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It’s Salamander mating season. And to do what that salamander needs to do to maintain the species he has to cross King Road – which means for a period of time King Road will be closed to traffic. This year, the road is already closed for construction of a nearby subdivision.

Salamander space at Nelson

The green patch has been identified as a natural habitat for the salamander and will not have public access. The shaded parts are land the Nelson Aggregate people want to extend their license to quarry. The large open area in the middle if the current quarry site that is reaching its extraction limits.

The annual passage of the endangered Jefferson salamanders during their breeding migration will begin soon on King Road near the base of the Niagara Escarpment to Mountain Brow Road. Since 2012, the City of Burlington has closed the same section of road for the salamanders which are a nationally and provincially protected endangered species.

The Jefferson Salamander has an exalted place in the minds of the environmentalists who want to keep the escarpment lands as pristine as possible which for them means not allowing any increasing in the size of the Nelson Aggregate open pit off Side Road number 2 at Guelph Line.

After failing to have an application to expand the pit in 2015 Nelson has filed a new application that sets aside land for the salamander.

That Nelson application is working its way through the application process.

JeffersonSalamander

Jefferson Salamander – becoming a cult figure with the various vested interests working to give them a place to live.

About the Jefferson Salamander
In Canada, the Jefferson salamander is found in Southern Ontario in select areas of deciduous forest, mostly along the Niagara Escarpment.

Jefferson salamanders spend most of their lives underground. As the weather warms up and the spring rains begin, the salamanders emerge and migrate to breed in temporary ponds formed by run-off, laying their eggs in clumps attached to underwater vegetation. Adults leave the ponds after breeding. By late summer, the larvae lose their gills, become air-breathing juveniles and leave the pond to head into the surrounding forests.

Adult salamanders migrate to their breeding ponds during wet rainy nights. They show a strong affinity for the pond in which they hatched and can be very determined to reach it, sometimes causing them to cross busy roads.

Burlington Mayor Marianne Meed Ward appears to have adopted the Jefferson salamander – referring to them as “Jeff” in her comments which we share below.

“The Jefferson Salamanders are a unique part of Burlington’s biodiversity and have become a truly beloved part of our local community. At the City of Burlington, in partnership with Conservation Halton, we’re glad to play a small role in protecting the salamanders while raising awareness about their endangered status – ‘Jeff’ also is earning an unofficial mascot status for our city. Closing off this section of King Road each year is proving to be an effective tool in supporting the survival and recovery of this rare species. I’m always grateful to our residents for being willing to inconvenience themselves for a short period of time to help ensure ‘Jeffs’ numbers flourish in the future.”

hassaan basit

Hassaan Basit, President and CEO, Conservation Halton

Hassaan Basit, President and CEO, Conservation Halton chimes in with:  “With all due respect to Wiarton Willie, here in Burlington, we look to the Jefferson Salamander to let us know that spring is on its way. As the warmer weather and rain arrive, the Jefferson Salamanders head towards breeding ponds, that without human intervention, would require some of them to make a dangerous trek across King Road. Conservation Halton is proud to partner with the City of Burlington each year to ensure that the salamanders can safely make their way to the ponds.”

The Jefferson salamander is protected at both the provincial and national levels. It was added to Ontario’s endangered species list in 2011.

Unlike most small animals, Jefferson salamanders can live a very long time; up to 30 years of age.

Return to the Front page

Public school board trustees looking for public comment on the selection of a new Director of Education.

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Several months ago, Stuart Miller, Director of Education for Halton District School Board, announced his retirement effective August 2021.

The Board of Trustees has begun the search process for a new Director of Education and have retained Joan M Green and Associates/Lough Barnes Consulting Group to guide them in the selection process.

Miller in a huddle with Grebenc

Board Chair Grebenc has worked well with the Director of Education

The trustees have decided to look to the community for comments and are inviting members of the community to participate in a voluntary survey to share their thoughts on the most important leadership attributes for a new Director of Education.

Please complete the Director’s Search Survey by 11:59 pm on Friday, March 19, 2021. It will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and is anonymous.

Andréa Grebenc, Chair for the Halton District School Board said: “The feedback received will assist us in developing a leadership profile and mandate for this critical role. The consultation process allows the Board to gather feedback on the characteristics, competencies and commitments necessary for effective leadership in the context of HDSB’s strengths, challenges and opportunities.”

Return to the Front page

Federal government prepared to hand out $400 million to the municipal sector for networks of pathways, bike lanes, trails and pedestrian bridges

News 100 redBy Staff

March 12th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

That $400 million the federal government is handing out over a five year period  – was given to every municipality in the country.

Each of those now has to put together their proposals and basically compete for the dollars.

It’s a good move – getting people outside never hurts.

The media release explained it this way:

Mountsberg - winter trails

Given the opportunity the people of Burlington get out every chance they get.

Today, the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Parliamentary Secretary Andy Fillmore announced $400 million over five years to help build new and expanded networks of pathways, bike lanes, trails and pedestrian bridges, as well as support for repairs and planning studies. This is the first federal fund dedicated to building active transportation through Canada – powered by people – and part of the Government of Canada’s plan to create one million jobs, fight climate change, and build a more sustainable and resilient economy.

The new $400-million fund is part of an eight-year, $14.9-billion public transit investment outlined by Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister McKenna on February 10, 2021. It will support communities as they build vibrant neighborhoods where people can safely live, work and play. The fund will also help Canadians living in rural communities and places without active transportation options to unlock the potential in their communities.

This is the rural Burlington residents want to keep - walking trails and quiet countryside.

Walking trails and quiet countryside.

In concert with this new fund, Minister McKenna and Parliamentary Secretary Fillmore also launched stakeholder engagement for Canada’s first Active Transportation Strategy. The strategy will be informed by input from the public and key stakeholders including provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and not-for-profit organizations and businesses and will help the federal government make smarter investment decisions to:

• Support the active transportation networks of the future;
• Promote healthier, walkable communities that are environmentally sustainable and affordable; and
• Support better data collection to ensure measurable outcomes.

Watch carefully for how you community responds to this opportunity.  Burlington is currently working on a Cycling Master Plan that is going to need to need millions to be completed – this fund appears to be tailor made for the Transportation people.

Return to the Front page

Have the provincial Liberals found the candidate that can take the seat back from Jane McKenna ?

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

March 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If you are a true democrat there is nothing nicer than an election.

If you’re a candidate – the push for power and a chance to get things done that you believe need to be done can be quite a rush.

2022 is an election year for both city hall and the provincial legislature. And this time around we just might see people holding a seat at city hall thinking they rather like the seats in the Legislature.

The Liberals are out looking for a candidate – a number of people have been approached – two and maybe three council members.

Meed ward looking askance

Some Liberals thought she was too divisive.

Not, surprisingly, the Mayor, who we thought had her eyes on the seat that Jane McKenna currently holds, would be in the running.

Meed Ward could not walk away from the work she has set out for herself, and the city of course, after just one term as Mayor.

We were surprised to hear Liberals saying, not suggesting, that Meed Ward was too divisive. I didn’t see that one coming.

Stoltr - Kearns - Nisan at bus money

Councillors Stolte, Kearns and Nisan: were all three invited to look at Queen’s Park.  Two of them were.

The Liberals we are hearing from – no one is talking for attribution and the current President of the Burlington Provincial Liberal Association isn’t returning our calls, suggests to us that Lisa Kearns has indicated she could get used to travelling to Toronto for work.

I have been working on a sit down meeting with Kearns (she knows what I want to talk about)  for the best part of this week – we haven’t managed to line up dates that work for both of us.

Bit of cat and mouse going on.

While 2022 is well over a year away, in the world of politics you begin organizing and putting out the feelers to the financial people.

The day of the big big dollar donations is over – takes a lot of work to bring in those hundreds of $50 and $100 dollar donations.
In 2022 things will get a little rushed as well – the province will send us to the polls on October 3rd and the municipalities will do the same thing on the 24th of October.

Doug Ford finger pointing

Doug Ford – He just might have a deal for you.

Covid19 has messed up everything taking place – it will probably do the same with the provincial date.

If Doug Ford can get a bit of a break and get enough of us vaccinated before those variant strains of Covid19 begin to run rampant he would be smart to call a snap election.

Problem with that is we really haven’t seen very much in the way of smart thinking so far have we?

The scientist’s world-wide have gotten us to where we are and for that we should all be grateful.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

Return to the Front page

In-progress contemporary dance works done by some of the very best - well worth your time

eventspink 100x100By Staff

March 12th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Aeris Körper has announced the eighth edition of PROSPECTS: an evening of dance and discussion.

FORM two dancers - one masked

The work this group does is almost theatre.

PROSPECTS brings together local enthusiasts of art and dance with choreographers from the local, regional and international dance community to cultivate creative community dialogue.

I call what Aeris does “progressive dance”.  They take huge risks with the dance art form – at times what you see will take your breath away.

Audience members will witness new and in-progress contemporary dance works whose themes will provide the foundation for the evening’s dialogue.

Each work will be followed by a Q&A discussion led by each choreographer, giving the audience an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and further examine the ideas presented. There will also be an opportunity to provide written feedback.

“This interactive, informal event brings together community members to share ideas, to learn about contemporary dance and to bring life to the local arts in Burlington,” said Lisa Emmons, Artistic Director.

Dance 1

On many of the performances you can feel the tension and the expression in the work.

Choreographers:
Elena Vazintaris
Emily Williams
Eric Dahlinger
Shreya Bollywood Dance
Thea Sachade

Tickets:
Can be reserved at eventbrite: https://bit.ly/3bpZ1VS

Event Details:
Thursday, March 25th, 2021
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Aeris Körper Zoom Room

Many thanks to the City of Burlington Arts and Culture Fund grant and Canadian Heritage for their ongoing support.

Return to the Front page

Those clocks Spring Forward - make the change on Sunday

News 100 blueBy Staff

March 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

Clocks - forwardDaylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 14, 2021, at 2:00 A.M.

The practice in many communities is to change the batteries in the smoke alarms and to adjust the clocks.

Homeowners:
As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to install and maintain smoke alarms on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas.

Landlords:
As a landlord, it is your responsibility to ensure your rental properties comply with this law.

Tenants/Renters:
If you are a tenant of a rental property and do not have the required number of smoke alarms, contact your landlord immediately. It is against the law for tenants to remove the batteries or tamper with the smoke alarms in any way.

Return to the Front page

Virtual meeting on a Housing Strategy gets more than a mouthful of data - but few realistic ideas were put on the table

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

MARCH 11th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The people who made the time to watch the first meeting on the approach the city wants to take to its Housing Strategy got a sense as to the size of the problem – along with plea from city staff running the virtual event to please take part in the survey and let them hear from you.

There weren’t enough people to keep the phone lines buzzing – a couple of people got in twice, one small developer created a phony name for himself and called in twice; one gentlemen needed three cracks at the log in procedure to make it to the screen.

Organizationally – it was presented in a traditional way – with a panel of people who are close to housing issues and have an understanding of the size of the challenge.

Then a panel of citizens and then calls were taken from those watching.

The five experts knew their stuff and brought unique and important perspectives to the event.

Mike Simiono, newly acquired Director of Community Planning (Burlington poached him from Oakville) talked about the meaning of owning a house and the role it take in creating community.

Ted Hildebrandt did a statistical overview. Some of his material was dated but the points were still clearly made.

The number of people who drive to Burlington from Hamilton was startling – the belief is that people live in Hamilton because housing is less expensive there.

commuting flow

The commuting flow in the chart on slide #7 was taken from the 2016 Census. It is derived from a question asking “At what address did this person usually work most of the time?” On this chart, the blue bars indicate people that are commuting to work in Burlington from the respective municipalities. The orange bars indicate people leaving Burlington to work in other municipalities. In terms of the figure of 24,505, this is the number of Hamilton residents that travel to work in Burlington.

 

 

 

rental vacancy 16-20

More space available …

rental rates Ham - Burl

... at less cost.

living alone 2016

The number of people living alone – Data as at 2016

pop changes regionCity staff did an entry explanation to set the context within which the city has to work. Currently the city has no direct responsibility for housing: that responsibility rests with the Region – they work with what the province makes available in terms of enabling legislation and funding.

The federal government does have a National Housing policy – it just doesn’t seem to be meeting the needs of places like Burlington.

Central Mortgage and Housing (CMHC) has been active and creative in funding and sponsoring creative approaches to housing – the co-op housing sector would not exist were it not for CMHC.

The cost of housing in Burlington and the availability of affordable housing is the challenge before the working group the city is setting up to dive deep into the data.

housing sales

Between 2015 and 2019, the average price of new sale in Burlington was $527,949 and the average price of resale was $676,628. On an average annual basis, the average price of new sales increased at a rate of 5.6 per cent per year. The average price of resale increased at a higher average rate of 9.3 per cent. The 5 year average price of both new and resale was $670,091, which increased at an average rate of 8.7 per cent per year.

affordable housing sales

Nine affordable units were sold for more than $393, 400 – which is the threshold for an affordable home. 24 were sold below the threshold.

City council endorsed a recommendation from the Planning department and hired consultants.  The plan is to move into an action-implementing mode once the results of the survey have been analyzed as well as any feedback from those that took part in the Zoom meeting.

A report gets taken to Council on April 6th.

There is a survey on the city Get Involved part of the web site. That survey is open until Match 19th – LINK to the survey.

 

 

There are affordable units in Burlington:

1,497 subsidized units made available by community housing providers in Burlington

838 units across 13 properties are directly owned/operated by Halton Community Housing Corporation.

659 other subsidized housing units are made available by 11 other non profit and cooperative housing providers funded by Halton Region.

162 additional new subsidized (brick and mortar) units were recently created in Burlington by the Region as part of the Comprehensive Housing Strategy

344 additional subsidized housing options and growing have been secured in Burlington with 16 landlords using rent supplement funding.

125 additional Burlington based households and growing are receiving a portable housing allowance to subsidize their rents.

This adds up to 2,128 subsidized units in Burlington.

City Council wants to increase that number – and is hoping to come up with a strategy that will make it possible.

There will be a part 2 with the comments made by the panelists.

 

Return to the Front page