Karen Roche named Fire Chief for City of Burlington

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Karen Roche has been named the Fire Chief for Burlington.

Chief Roche brings more than 24 years of progressive Fire service experience working in many facets of the emergency services.

Karen Roche

Karen Roche has been named the Fire Chief for Burlington

Most recently as Acting Fire Chief and prior to that Deputy Fire chief with the City of Burlington.

Chief Roche was the first woman to be named a Deputy Fire Chief – that was in December of 2o14.

This has afforded Karen a thorough understanding of the challenges of managing modern fire services during times of economic, demographic and community risk-based issues, including her role in the Emergency Control Group (ECG) during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

The City of Burlington is committed to promoting access, equality, diversity and human rights through innovative policy, programs and services. Chief Roche is committed to contribute in a meaningful way to this through her appointments to the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC); International Diversity Executive Leadership Program (iDELP) and more recently the joint Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs (CAFC) / International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) appointment to the International Bullying Taskforce.

Return to the Front page

Very credible citizen points to some sloppy prevention practices at Jo Brant.

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

OPINION

We received a comment recently from a reader that is very disturbing.

We have chosen not to identify the woman but can verify that she is very credible.

Here is what she had to say:

“I had an appointment last week at a nearby medical center. When I arrived, I was told to call the number posted on the door and wait in my car until someone came to find me.

“Once I was escorted inside, my mask was checked, my temperature was taken and I was led to the doctor’s office.  In contrast today, I went to Joseph Brant for a scheduled procedure.

“Entering through the north doors, I found people wandering in and out randomly. The question check was quick, no instructions were given as far as hand sanitizer and I was left to wander the hallways to find the location of the unit I was to visit.

“In my opinion, the hospital must do a better job of screening those who are required to visit this facility in these difficult times.”

The Joseph Brant Hospital has a regrettable history of sloppy prevention practices.  We thought the lesson had been learned.  Time for the hospital Board members to ask some hard and direct questions, and for the Medical Officer of health to visit and underline what this pandemic requires of the medical community.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

Return to the Front page

Amateur radio is something those looking for a something to keep them occupied might consider

News 100 yellowBy Staff

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Figuring out what to do with the time we have on our hands is going to be a bit of a challenge for some people.

The Burlington Amateur Radio Club sent us a note saying – Hello – we’re here!

They report that there is a surging interest in Amateur Radio all over the world.

RADIO IN dUBAI

Yathiraj Chintagunta

Today’s Amateur Radio is not what their grandfather’s ham radio was all about. The Burlington Amateur Radio Club (BARC) offers an on-line course which became particularly interesting to Yathiraj Chintagunta who was stranded in Dubai unable to return to his home in Mississauga. His “handle” is now VE3GYP.

Amateur radio is a fascinating hobby that frequently becomes essential for people in some parts of the world when there is a disaster and normal forms of communication are not available.

If you’re at all interested get in touch with Rod Clifton, ve3iso@gmail.com • 905-335-0267 or Hugh McCully, Education Director.

Return to the Front page

Land just to the north of City Hall where Cenotaph stands to be named Veteran Square

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

November is seen as the time when we think more seriously about veterans from the wars we have fought.

Remembrance Day wreaths - dozens at cenotaph

The space to be named Veteran Square

Yesterday City Council accepted a request from the Burlington Legion to name the area to the immediate north of City Hall on Brant Street where the Cenotaph is located and forever call the space Veterans Square.

There will be signage on the location with the new name.

Bob Ankrett spoke for the Legion and mentioned something this reporter didn’t know – that there are two Vimy Ridge oak trees on the site.

During the discussion Council talked in terms of using the word veteran to apply to first responders in the future  as well

Return to the Front page

Joseph Brant Hospital updates their caregiver and support person presence guidelines

News 100 redBy Staff

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Joseph Brant Hospital is updating its caregiver and support person presence guidelines effective today. The following statement was released by the hospital:

An architects rendering of the new entrance to the Joseph Brant Hospital whch will now face the lake. The entrance will be off LAkeshore Road with the new parking lot just to the west of the hospital.

An architect’s rendering of the new entrance to Joseph Brant Hospital. 

Joseph Brant Hospital is updating its caregiver and support person presence guidelines effective November 24, 2020, in accordance with the regional approach during COVID-19. Our hospital recognizes that caregivers and support persons are essential partners in care. We continue to perform surgical and out-patient clinical care, including emergency care, and are committed to maintaining a safe environment for staff and visitors.

The updates are as follows:

• Approved caregiver and support person(s) may visit on consecutive days as opposed to the even and odd room number stipulations that were previously in effect
• Patients may change the name(s) of designated caregiver or support person(s) after 14 days if required

Please note that along with these updates, the following visitor limitations remain in effect:

• In-patients: Up to two caregivers/support persons (18+) identified by the patient may visit during visiting hours (9 a.m. to 8 p.m.). Only one caregiver/support person will be permitted on site at any given time and designated caregivers must ensure this by coordinating their visits.

• Ambulatory Care (out-patients): Only the patient should be attending an outpatient appointment due to the need to maintain physical distancing. If the patient is frail or very ill and requires assistance, one family member/caregiver is permitted. Attending caregivers/support persons need to be approved in advance by clinic staff.

• Emergency & Urgent Care: Visitors are not permitted except under exceptional circumstances. Please see our website for the most up-to-date information.

• Patients who are pregnant/in labour/postpartum: Labouring women may be accompanied by a single care partner during labour, birth and postpartum. The care partner can stay overnight with in and out privileges. Visitors are not permitted.

Before planning your visit, please carefully review our hospital’s visitor policy on our website to help provide the safest possible hospital experience. All visitors must wear a mask at all times and consumption of food is not permitted in patient rooms. Any food brought in for a patient must be individually packaged and not shared.

Whenever possible, we encourage patients to connect with their loved ones by telephone and video. Telephone and WiFi are free for patients and iPads are available to help keep them connected.

For more information, please visit the hospital’s COVID-19 information on their website.

 

Return to the Front page

Smoking and Vaping in Public Places now Prohibited

News 100 redBy Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was a resolution passed at regional Council where it was agreed that each municipal council would agree ro pass the resolution as well – which got us to:

Whereas on July 15, 2020 Halton Regional Council approved Report MO 15-20 – Smoking and Vaping in Public Places and enacted Halton Region By-law 40-20, to Prohibit Smoking and Vaping in Public Places within the Regional Municipality of Halton; and

Whereas pursuant to the Municipal Act, 2001, S.O. 2001, c.25, Section 115, (5) when a smoking in public places by-law from an upper tier municipality is passed, a majority of councils of all its lower municipalities must pass a resolution giving their consent, representing a majority of all electors in the upper tier municipality;

Therefore, be it resolved that the Council for the Corporation of the City of Burlington consents to the passage and implementation of Halton Region By-law 40-20, to Prohibit Smoking and Vaping in Public Places within the Regional Municipality of Halton.

No mention in the resolution as to how this will be enforced and if there are fines involved.

 

Return to the Front page

Tim Hortons does a pivot; decides to sponsor free skating program - Covid rules limit ice pad to 10 people for one hour

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The very popular Tim Horton’s Free Skate program lost the donut maker’s sponsorship and, due to Covid rules, rink time was limited to 10 people on an ice pad for an hour, was what residents were looking at.

Tim Horton free skateTim Horton’s advised the city today that they would now sponsor the 65 skate sessions. Expect the number of sessions to increase now that the sponsorship is back in place.

The Tim Horton’s people were concerned with the number of people who would be on the ice pad at the same time.  With that issue resolved they were back at the table.

This Covid world has everything changing often.

You will have to register for one of those time slots. They will be spread around the different rinks in the city

Return to the Front page

Province puts it hands around the throats of the Conservation Authorities

News 100 greenBy Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The core mandate of Conservation Authorities across the province is being threatened by an item that was included in a Budget Bill, Budget bill issues do not require public comment.  The changes will be debated in the Legislature only.

Ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan and Mayor Meed Ward sent a memorandum to their Council  colleagues.

It is worth a wider audience.

The attached resolution is in response to changes made by the provincial government to the Conservation Authorities Act and Planning Act.

Despite not being related to budget issues, it has been added into the budget bill. As a result, there is no requirement for public comment. Nevertheless, we must make our voice heard.There are numerous unacceptable changes. In summary:

Developers will now be able to bypass conservation authorities

Escarpment - view to fields

Escarpment is a large part of what defines the city.

The permitting process ensures development does not occur in flood hazard areas and that our creeks, valleys and wetlands are not adversely impacted. Permits will be allowed to be approved by the province directly rather than through conservation authorities.

RESULT: less protections for the community and environment, and increased risk to public safety.

Parks could be threatened

Under the new legislation the ministry could set fees or other limits on non-mandatory programs and services.

RESULT: Conservation Halton’s ability to provide important recreational, educational, and employment opportunities that allow our community to interact with conservation will be significantly diminished. All of these opportunities are provided at no cost to taxpayers and benefit all recreation users in the area.

Governance of Conservation Halton will be undermined, potentially politicizing the body

The changes demand that board members represent their municipalities rather than acting in the best interests of Conservation Halton (against all board best practices).

Conservation Halton sign - angleRESULT: Conservation Halton could be politicized as board members would be expected to promote their municipalities’ interests which sometimes conflict with the best interest of Conservation Halton. The directors carry out their fiduciary responsibilities, guide strategy, approve policies in support of our provincial and municipal responsibilities and track performance. They ensure CH makes decisions with integrity, based solely on our  responsibilities and remains apolitical, yet innovative and solution oriented. That could all be lost as we will be obliged to act otherwise according to the draft legislation.

Hamstringing science and conservation protections

The legislation creates new workarounds to undermine conservation authorities.

This is the rural Burlington residents want to keep - walking trails and quiet countryside.

This is the rural Burlington residents want to keep – walking trails and quiet countryside.

RESULT: Independent science-based decisions in the interest of the community will be significantly limited; our wetlands, valleys, and water will be at risk; the ability to remedy violations that put our environment and communities in danger will be minimized.

Conservation Halton’s mission is to help protect the natural environment, from lake to escarpment, for the benefit and enjoyment of current and future residents. Supporting our natural heritage benefits human, ecological, and economic health. We inherited our natural spaces from the generations before us and will pass them on to our children and future generations.

Our duty as stewards is what continues to inspire us to use science to study and inform us about climate change impacts to our communities and mitigation strategies. Make no mistake, all of this is at risk through this legislation.

 

Return to the Front page

Stolen property investigation in Burlington leads to the arrest of three

Crime 100By Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON,, ON

 

The Halton Regional Police Service has made a number of arrests in relation to a stolen property investigation in Burlington.

HRPS crestSince August of 2020, various LCBO and Metro grocery stores throughout the City of Burlington and the Town of Oakville have been targeted by thieves.

The Burlington Criminal Investigations Bureau began investigating the individuals responsible for stealing alcohol from these locations.  Investigation revealed that the stolen alcohol was then sold for profit.

Investigation by the Burlington Risk Mitigation Team and Street Crime Unit has led to charges against the following individuals;

Victor KARANIKOLOV (42 years old from Mississauga)

  • Possession of Property Obtained by Crime – Trafficking Over $5000
  • Possession of Property Obtained by Crime – Trafficking Under $5000
  • Trafficking Contraband Tobacco

Cory MOWERS (50 years old from Mississauga)

  • Trafficking Property Obtained by Crime
  • Theft Under $5000 (3 counts)
  • Fail to Comply Release Order

Suzanne GRIMES (42 years old from Mississauga)

  • Trafficking Property Obtained by Crime
  • Theft Under $5000 (2 counts)
  • Fail to Comply Release Order

On November 20th 2020, Halton Police executed a search warrant at a residence in the City of Mississauga.  As a result; the following items were seized:

  • Approximately $50,000 in stolen property (electronics, alcohol, personal care products, tools, clothing)
  • Anti-Theft Alarm Tags
  • 43 cartons of contraband cigarettes
  • 2 sets of magnetic keys used to remove alarm tags
  • 2 cellular telephones
  • 1 laptop
  • $2570.00 cash

Mowers was held pending a court appearance in Milton.

Karanikolov and Grimes have been released from custody on an undertaking.

Anyone with information in regards to this investigation is asked to contact Acting Detective Kelly Blore of the 3 District Risk Mitigation Team at 905-825-4747 ext. 2306.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers.  “See something? Hear something? Know something? Contact Crime Stoppers” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.

Please be reminded that all persons charged are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

 

 

began investigating the individuals responsible for stealing alcohol from these locations.

Investigation revealed that the stolen alcohol was then sold for profit.

Investigation by the Burlington Risk Mitigation Team and Street Crime Unit has led to charges against the following individuals;

Victor KARANIKOLOV (42 years old from Mississauga)
• Possession of Property Obtained by Crime – Trafficking Over $5000
• Possession of Property Obtained by Crime – Trafficking Under $5000
• Trafficking Contraband Tobacco

Cory MOWERS (50 years old from Mississauga)
• Trafficking Property Obtained by Crime
• Theft Under $5000 (3 counts)
• Fail to Comply Release Order

Suzanne GRIMES (42 years old from Mississauga)
• Trafficking Property Obtained by Crime
• Theft Under $5000 (2 counts)
• Fail to Comply Release Order

On November 20th 2020, Halton Police executed a search warrant at a residence in the City of Mississauga. As a result; the following items were seized:

• Approximately $50,000 in stolen property (electronics, alcohol, personal care products, tools, clothing)
• Anti-Theft Alarm Tags
• 43 cartons of contraband cigarettes
• 2 sets of magnetic keys used to remove alarm tags
• 2 cellular telephones
• 1 laptop
• $2570.00 cash

Mowers was held pending a court appearance in Milton.

Karanikolov and Grimes have been released from custody on an undertaking.

Anyone with information in regards to this investigation is asked to contact Acting Detective Kelly Blore of the 3 District Risk Mitigation Team at 905-825-4747 ext. 2306.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers. “See something? Hear something? Know something? Contact Crime Stoppers” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.

Please be reminded that all persons charged are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Return to the Front page

That patch of red

News 100 greenBy Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is beauty within all that snow.

The small path of red – the Canadian flag – waiting for a whiff of wind to flutter.

Winter and the flag

Getting outside, making a snow man with immediate family and the people in your bubble is Staying Safe.

Return to the Front page

Winter snow illuminated with bright Festive Season lights.

eventspink 100x100By Staff

November 23rd, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

That almost balmy weather we all enjoyed has been replaced by the winter that is part of our DNA.

At the same time parts of the city are lit up to help celebrate a Festive Season that will soon be upon us.

Freeman

Locomotive at Freeman station – waiting for a caboose to be attached. Photo by Allan Harrington

Freeman Station has a Lit Loco on display at their site on Fairview. This creation has about 4,000 lamps with chasers to give it a sense of movement.

Grand Trunk is spelled out in letters for the Grand Trunk Railway who built the Burlington Junction Station in 1906.
Friends of Freeman Station is run by volunteers and relies on donations.

If the group can capture a total of $500 in donations on line by November 27 2020, a lit up red caboose will be installed along with the existing Locomotive and Coal Car.

SS sentry

BTTB sentries standing guard at Spencer Smith Park.

Lakeshore Road at Brant now has the Burlington Teen Tour Band back on duty as sentries at Spencer Smith Park. Great for an early evening get out for some fresh air event. This is the 25th Festival of Lights.

Running now through to January 8, 2021 – it’s FREE and visitors can walk among the displays.

The Freeman lights and those at Spencer Smith are all the result of volunteer efforts.

Royal Botanical Gardens opened up their winter wonderland with the Hendrie Garden bursting with lights.

The Royal Botanical Gardens colourful outdoor stroll along the the pathway tells us how plants like mistletoe and ivy are part of the yule season, along with cinnamon and mint giving us festive flavours.

Not just plants, but local winter animals are part of the whole nature package.

Hendrie Grdens

Hendrie Garden at the RBG – a winter wonderland.

RBG indoors

It isn’t all outdoors at the RBG.

A big TV projection screen TV outside shows a short movie with a “Mouse” but it’s NOT Mickey.

Wednesdays to Sundays, Nov 18 to Dec 23.  Additional Dates: Dec 27-30, Jan 2, 3 5 to 10 p.m

Admission fee for non-members, and everyone must wear a mask and maintain social distancing

Return to the Front page

People cancelling medical procedures at Brant hospital

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 20th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The news that there was a Covid19 outbreak in part of the Joseph Brant Hospital earlier this week has resulted in some people cancelling their medical procedures.

The hospital Chief of Staff, Dr. Ian Preyra, said in a video message that the hospital is doing everything possible to keep everyone safe.

Some patients are starting to cancel or delay their medical procedures, which can pose a serious risk to their health. The hospital “would like to assure our community that our hospital is still safe to visit and we continue to perform surgical and out-patient clinical care, including urgent, life-saving procedures and other emergency care.”

There was no word on the condition of those who contracted Covid19.

Related news story:

Covid19 outbreak at hospital

Return to the Front page

Calling all Art Lovers in Burlington! Participate on a Community Public Art Jury

artsorange 100x100By Staff

November 20th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington spends quite a bit of money on public art.

They want to refresh and add to the jury list they have to help with the judging of what merits funding.

The placing of public art in the city has raised a lot of negative comment. Most people don't understrand why the sculture, a modernistic interpretation of orchids was installed in the middle of a busy road. There is a solution to this problem.

The placing of public art in the city: Most people don’t understand why the sculpture, a modernistic interpretation of orchids was installed in the middle of a busy road.

Aldershot Public art #4

Public Art: Plains Road at Waterdown Road

If you love art and your community, help make your mark on the City of Burlington’s Public Art program by participating on a public art jury. The City is looking for local artists, creative professionals and residents to evaluate public art applications throughout the year.

No experience is necessary! Each jury is made up of a mix of arts professionals and residents that represent a broad cross-section of the community.

If you are interested in volunteering, please fill out a brief online application form at Burlington.ca/publicart or fill out the online application directly by clicking here.

Return to the Front page

Covering for our Neighbours

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Your help is needed!

November 22nd 11am-1pm

Burlington Food Bank one day Neighbourhood Covid-19:FOOD DRIVE at 21 locations & counting!

Covid-safe Porch Drop off of non-perishable food, gift card or monetary donations at any of the neighbourhood porch drop offs to help support the many in our community who are in need.

If you think you can help – and be part of this event be in touch with either:

Chania Allen chania@razmataz.ca or Lisa Kearns <Lisa.Kearns@burlington.ca>

In April, this event brought in 2.2 TONS of food and over $1000 in donations. Let’s try to do even better in preparation for the holidays.

Covid-safe Porch Drop off of non-perishable food, gift card or monetary donations at any of the neighbourhood porch drop offs to help support the many in our community who are in need.

Here are the current Top Ten Most Needed Items:
(will update as required)
Canned Meat (Ham, Turkey, Chicken)
Rice (1kg or 2kg sizes)
Peanut Butter
Nut Free school lunch snacks
Canned Tomatoes
Shampoo, Deodorant, Toothpaste and Toothbrushes
Hot Cereal (Oatmeal/Porridge Single Servings)
Canned Fruit
Large Soup (Ready To Eat)
Condiments (Ketchup, Mustard, Sauces)

Food Bank strong drive graphicYour help is needed! November 22nd 11am-1pm – Burlington Food Bank one day Neighbourhood Covid-19:FOOD DRIVE at 21 locations & counting!

At the same time: If you are in need or know of someone who could use our help PLEASE have them email us at info@burlingtonfoodbank.ca or call 905-637-2273 to make arrangements to have food dropped at their door or make arrangements to pick it up through our curb-side pickup option. If you live in Burlington, we are here to help. Don’t struggle – give us a call.

Return to the Front page

Charges Laid after Investigation into Local Ponzi Scheme

Crime 100By Staff

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON
Was it raw greed or just plain dumb responses?  Something in the order of $1.3 million was involved.

HRPS crestThe Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) Regional Fraud Unit has completed a three year investigation into a Ponzi scheme operating in the region that defrauded victims out of approximately 1.3 million dollars.

Victims of this fraud transferred money believing that they were investing in a legitimate stock market investment program.

Victims initially received small returns from funds obtained by new investors. This type of fraud is commonly referred to as a ‘Ponzi Scheme’. Money invested by victims was then used for the personal and financial gain of the accused.

Police have arrested and charged Francesco Perre (AKA Frank Perre), 56 years of age of Burlington.

Perre has been charged with six counts of fraud over $5000 and misappropriation of funds. He is scheduled to appear in court in Milton on December 23, 2020.

Police believe there may be additional victims of this fraud and would encourage them to contact Detective Constable Garry Hans of the Regional Fraud Unit at 905 825 4747 ext. 8742.

The HRPS encourages members of the public to conduct due diligence prior to making investments and to be wary of investments that sound too good to be true.

Return to the Front page

Two 20 storey towers proposed for Fairview - east of Appleby Line - virtual meeting December 3rd

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Different development news: a two tower project that isn’t in the downtown core and isn’t on Brant Street.

Fairview 2 x 20 storeyThe proposed development would consist of a mixed-use development consisting of two 20-storey residential towers, with commercial and office space provided on the first two storeys. A total of 2,982.4 square metres of commercial space is proposed and a total of 390 residential units.

Location is 5041 Fairvew, east of Appleby Line.

There will be the now required pre-application virtual meeting on December 3rd, 2020 at 7 pm.

We will provide the links few days before.

Return to the Front page

Stuart Miller, Director of Education for Halton District School Board resigns

News 100 redBy Staff

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

At last night’s Board of Trustee meeting (Nov. 18, 2020) Stuart Miller, Director of Education for the Halton District School Board, officially announced his retirement, effective Aug. 11, 2021.

Stuart Miller

Stuart Miller, Director of education HDSB resigns – why now?

Miller, who has been the HDSB Director of Education since 2015 says the decision was difficult but he will always look back on his career in Halton with the fondest of memories.

“Although there have been many challenging moments, especially this year as we navigate through the pandemic, they are far outweighed by those times that brought me joy and a sense of purpose,” Miller says. “I only hope that I was able to do the same for all those staff, parents and especially students I have had the pleasure to work with and for. I would very much like to thank the current Board of Trustees and all those former trustees who entrusted me to lead the Board. Your faith in public education and confidence in me will never leave my thoughts.”

In her remarks, Halton District School Board Chair Andréa Grebenc says: “On behalf of all the Trustees, we thank Stuart for all he has done for the students, staff, Halton community and beyond. Stuart has inspired his team to do amazing, innovative things.”

“Stuart has reached into schools to develop personal, encouraging relationships with students and frontline staff. He has been an amazing relationship-builder with a wonderful sense of humour. His fiery oration has energized and galvanized, but it has also invoked empathy and a sense of duty and focus. Stuart looks for ways to both improve the system and himself, and he has accomplished so much in his long career with the Halton District School Board.”

Miller joined the HDSB in 1984 as a secondary school science and math teacher. His teaching career included teaching in Scotland and in Malawi, East Africa. In addition to being a Principal and Vice-principal in the HDSB, he also coached hockey and soccer, coordinated science fairs, and initiated and organized social justice conferences for students.

In 2009, Miller was appointed to the position of Superintendent of Education, and moved into the role of Associate Director in 2014. Prior to becoming the Director of Education, Miller had been instrumental in creating the Welcome Centre for students new to Canada and implementing an expansion of the international student program within the Board.

“I want to thank the senior team, both current and past,” Miller says. “You have been an endless source of inspiration to and for me. Your dedication to the welfare and success of our students and staff are unparalleled.”

The Board of Trustees will begin a comprehensive search process for a new Director of Education in the new year.

Return to the Front page

Small Covid19 outbreak at Joseph Brant Hospital: 3 case workers and 1 patient now fully isolated.

News 100 redBy Staff

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Three health care workers and one patient on 7 South 100 (7S100) at Joseph Brant Hospital have tested positive for COVID-19. In consultation with Halton Public Health, a COVID-19 outbreak has been declared on this Medicine inpatient unit.

Joseph Brant hospital rendering

Covid19 outbreak on the 7 South wing

Joseph Brant Hospital’s Infection Prevention and Control team and Employee Health Services are working closely with Halton Public Health to monitor all patients, staff and physicians who had direct contact with those infected with COVID-19.

All patients on the units, along with staff and physicians who have been exposed, are being contacted and tested. The affected health care workers are currently in isolation at home, and will not return to work until they have completed the self-isolation period and are asymptomatic.

Additional important measures have been taken to protect the health and safety of our patients, families or care providers, staff and physicians, including:

• Enhanced daily deep cleaning on the unit
• Monitoring patients for any new symptoms, especially fever, cough and shortness of breath. Tests will be immediately ordered for patients should they develop COVID-19 symptoms
• Closing 7S100 to visitors, with very limited exceptions. Family members and caregivers are asked to work with the patient’s care team to discuss arrangements for exceptional visits.

These enhanced protocols will remain in place for the duration of the declared outbreak, then reassessed on an ongoing basis with Halton Public Health to minimize further risks in the hospital and throughout our community.

 

Return to the Front page

Regional Council holds a very successful virtual Special meeting devoted to hearing delegation on the Official Plan.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was the day for the Regional Council to hear delegations on the five reports that were background for the current Review of the Official Plan.

The papers were serious stuff; well written, very well illustrated. The community has said it wishes it had had more time to review and prepare comments. But that window has closed.

Curt Benson, told Regional Council that there had been more than 200 written reports sent to his office on the papers.
The delegations covered three areas: farming, climate change

In late January perhaps February the Region will be releasing four growth concept and waiting 100 days for responses and community engagement.

That will be followed by a preferred concept probably in the Fall of 2021.

The Region is moving on two levels that are attached to each other at the same time.

Process graph

The two bottom circles relate to the Burlington MTSA and UGC issues. While part of the Regional Official Plan they will be processed separately and then wrapped into the Region’s OP

The Burlington MTSA and Urban Growth Centre (UGC) issues are being dealt with separately but are still a part of the Regional Official Plan Review.

Whatever decision gets made on the MTSA and UGC from a Burlington perspective will be included in the next version of the Official Plan that is released.

There will be a Statutory meeting on the Regional Official Plan in the fall of 2021.

The expectation is that the MTSA in Burlington will be removed.

The focus for the Regional Planning department is:

What has been heard to date?

Did we hear you?

Is this what you are saying?

The listening exercise is an ongoing process.

The delegations started with remarks from Sofina Foods which operates 11 pork processing plants in Canada and maintain that they cannot keep up with the demand for pork from the market which they export around the world.

They have major plans to develop and expand the Fearman’s operation on Harvester Road and Appleby Line and are concerned that the boundary in place for the Appleby Line GO station (which was at one time called a hub but is now an MTSA.

The Sofina spokesperson said there are 150 family farms within a three hour drive of the plant that meet some of the need but that in the not too distant future they want to expand that operation.

The question is – will an even bigger food processing operation fit into that part of Burlington?

Sofina wants to be certain that they are part of the economic development of Burlington. They are a major employer and the demand for pork grows steadily.

What was interesting was that the several people who talked about the problems the farming community has none made any mention of the part that Sofina play in the agricultural sector.

We learned that close to half the agricultural land is believed to be owned by interest other than induvial farmers; that most of the land is being banked by the development community.

The agricultural community wants a ban on the conversation of agricultural land.

Climate change was the base of close to half of the delegations – these were for the most part coming from community based organizations who advocate and lobby for more in the way of climate change efforts.

Vanessa Warren 2

Vanessa Warren, delegates with conviction, passionate and firmer grip on the facts that the vast majority of the Regional Councillors.

Vanessa Warren, who always delegates with conviction, passionate and firmer grip on the facts that the vast majority of the Regional Councillors said that the framework the agricultural sector has to work within cannot be fixed, “we have to bring it down”.

Warren said that a farmer can grow turnips but that they cannot process those turnips on their land under the current conditions.

Agricultural Tourism was said to need some help. Prince Edward County has figured out how that can be done very effectively – Halton isn’t there yet.

The Evergreen development that is in Burlington with the Oakville border on the other side of the road at Tremaine and Dundas was described by Burlington Mayor Meed Ward as the poster boy of the developer’s world.

Evergreen phasing

The Evergreen development would go through two phases with employment offices fronting onto the street on the east side.

They must be blushing at the corporate offices in Milton. That project started in 2007 and will consist of 1945 residences whenever it is completed.

ALOG lands

The land assembly has been in the works for some time. Whatever development plans there are have yet to hit city hall. with the Aldershot GO station a very short walk away the land is primed for growth.

The IBI Group representative brought forward concerns with a property development that includes abutting lands owned by four different corporations that is on the west side of Waterdown Road – north side of Plains Road.

They are looking for employment land conversions that would occur simultaneously with MTSA delineation, through phased ROPA.

There is much more to learn about this development.

It is big with the Emshie interests and St. Mary’s Cement involved.

The Station West development that is underway now with a number of units occupied.  When completed Station West will become a community unto itself and will need services and access to good retail.

Aldershot has wanted some strong retail – this development just might bring it to their doorstep.

The Development plans for the east side of Waterdown are inching forward.  Solid Gold, Aldershot’s ongoing embarrassment, is planned as the site for a decent coffee shop and a small supermarket if the ward Councillor can convince the Solid Gold owner that it can be made to work.

What the area is not going to have is very much in the way of parkland in the immediate area.  LaSalle Park to the south is a decent walk away. It will be under considerable pressure.

The swimming pool at Aldershot high school will see increased pressure.

There were no clashes, no major points being made by the bigger interests. For the most part they weren’t involved in the virtual event

The Regional Clerk was pressed to keep all the balls in the air – he pulled it off. Chair Carr thought Graham Milne might have a future as an air traffic controller in Chicago.

Return to the Front page

Citizen Engagement scrambling for committee members

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

November 19th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON’

 

It was a one hour virtual meeting with about 35 people taking part – at least five were city staff.

City Clerk Kevin Arjoon explained the basics of what City Advisory Committees are all about. He listed most of the committees.

The Cycling Committee needs 14 new members – that seems very high unless all the previous members all left at the same time.

Members of the Community Engagement Team do a debrief after their Council Workshop session. Chris Walker is in the center.

Members of the Community Engagement Team do a debrief after their Council Workshop session. Chris Walker is in the center.

The closing date for new applications is November 27th – that closing date has been extended in the past – expect it to be extended again this year.

The intention is to announce the appointments at a Council meeting in January or February.

Arjoon is a big fan of citizen advisory committees – he has seen them work well in the five different municipalities where he has served as Clerk.

However, shortly before Arjoon arrived in Burlington a report from citizens on problems with the way the Advisory committees were created was debated at a City Standing Committee.

It was a lengthy report with perhaps too much data. It has one central point: that was set out in a Historical Note.

Adv Comm Review graphic

It was a major piece of work for the citizens – didn’t get past the printing machine.

Historical Note
This report and its recommendations represent the fourth occasion on which citizens have been asked to provide advice to council on Advisory Committee reform, beginning in 1997.

On each occasion, while the recommendations have differed since 1997, the initial conclusions were similar. Advisory committees far too often did not work as intended and were not properly integrated into the decision-making process.

Poor structure, poor terms of reference, misunderstandings, lack of relevant training, and selection methods open to influence all worked to undermine the role advisory committees should have in establishing citizen voices with appropriate input at the centre of City Hall.

We therefore encourage council to adopt our recommendations, recognizing the very longstanding need for change and the ongoing need for flexible, collaborative and insightful resident voices as trusted partners at City Hall and with staff and Council.

Until the issues set out in the Advisory Committee review Team are resolved Citizen Engagement will be less than robust.

Return to the Front page