Is a large donut sitting atop a building public art?

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 30th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Donut - sunshine

Is it art? Who cares?

When it comes to public art – it is all really in the eye of the beholder. People like what they like and without any introduction to art in school – you get some pretty weird stuff.

Tucked in at the south end of the Art Gallery of Burlington is a donut shop with the name – Sunshine.

The Burlington Cream is not to be missed – but you have to be there early. At $4 bucks apiece that may seem a little extreme – d-e-l-i-c-i-o-u-s!

While doing a photo feature on the current exhibit at the AGB we noticed Sunshine’s contribution to public art.

Sunshine Donut shop

Tucked in at the south end of the Art Gallery parking lot. Get there early they do sell out. No such things as a day old donut.

You know the product is as good as it gets when you notice fire trucks on the way back to the station stopping in for a bite to eat.

Sunshine Donut shop hours

No signs like this on Brant Street

When Sunshine first opened the hours were open until the production for the day had been sold.

They did a brisk business – the lemon cream was to die for.

First story on the Sunshine donut shop.

 

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West Nile virus detected in Burlington

News 100 redBy Staff

July 28th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Two batches of mosquitoes trapped this week in the City of Burlington have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV).

These are the first batches of WNV positive mosquitoes confirmed in Burlington this year.

In 2017, an additional four batches were confirmed in Oakville and one batch in Milton, for a total of seven WNV positive batches in Halton to date.

wev

“The Halton Region Health Department works diligently to reduce the risk of West Nile virus in our community through both education and preventative programs such as larviciding,” said Dr. Julie Emili, Acting Medical Officer of Health, Halton Region. “We can all work together to keep our community safe and protect ourselves from West Nile virus by removing standing water sites that breed mosquitos and covering up or applying DEET or Icaridin when outside during dusk and dawn.”

Urban areas are more likely to have mosquitoes that carry WNV. The types of mosquitoes that transmit WNV to humans most commonly breed in urban areas, typically in places that hold water such as bird baths, plant pots, old toys, and tires.

Residents can take the following steps to protect themselves and their families from mosquitoes:

West Nile mosquito biting• Cover up. Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved shirts and pants with tightly-woven fabric.
• Use an approved insect repellent, such as one containing DEET or Icaridin.
• Avoid being outdoors from early evening to morning when mosquitoes are most active and likely to bite, as well as at any time in shady, wooded areas.
• Make sure your window and door screens are tight and without holes, cuts or other openings.
• Reduce mosquito breeding sites around your home by getting rid of all water-filled containers and objects, where possible. Change the water in bird baths at least once per week.

To report standing water at public facilities or for more information about West Nile virus, please visit halton.ca/wnv, call 311 or e-mail wnv@halton.ca.

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What will be where when the hospital opens in August?

jbhhealth (2)By Staff

July 9th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

August 21st – the Official opening of the brand new and rebuilt parts of the Joseph Brant Hospital will take place – lots of hoopla and everyone being proud of a job well done.

Now we all have to figure out how to use the place.

Getting there will be different; the entrance will be in a different place and the drive will take you along Lakeshore Road as it cuts towards the lake edge.

The hospital communications usually do an excellent job of getting information out and in the early stages there will be all kinds of people on hand to get you to where you want to go.

The public has had to come of with $120 million of the cost of the new hospital – $60 million is being paid by the taxpayer – seperate line on your tax bill and an additional $60 million that is being raised by the hospital Foundation.  They are in the final stretch of the fund raising effort.

For the immediate future the graphic below shows you the fundamentals.

Hospital - what is where

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First batch of mosquitoes tested positive for West Nile virus found in the Region

News 100 greenBy Staff

June 9th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It isn’t a big deal until there is a depot of someone being infected with the West Nile Virus (WNV).

WestNileVirus_transmissionThe infections get to us from mosquitoes that care carrying the virus.

A batch of mosquitoes trapped last week in Oakville has tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). This is the first batch of WNV positive mosquitoes confirmed in Halton this year.

“The Halton Region Health Department works diligently to reduce the risk of West Nile virus in our community through both education and preventative programs such as larviciding,” said Dr. Daniela Kempkens, Acting Medical Officer of Health, Halton Region.

“We can all work together to keep our community safe and protect ourselves from West Nile virus by removing standing water sites that breed mosquitos and covering up or applying DEET or Icaridin when outside during dusk and dawn.”

Urban areas are more likely to have mosquitoes that carry WNV. The types of mosquitoes that transmit WNV to humans most commonly breed in urban areas, typically in places that hold water such as bird baths, plant pots, old toys, and tires.

Residents can take the following steps to protect themselves and their families from mosquitoes:

• Cover up. Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved shirts and pants with tightly-woven fabric.
• Use an approved insect repellent, such as one containing DEET or Icaridin.
• Avoid being outdoors from early evening to morning when mosquitoes are most active and likely to bite, as well as at any time in shady, wooded areas.
• Make sure your window and door screens are tight and without holes, cuts or other openings.
• Reduce mosquito breeding sites around your home by getting rid of all water-filled containers and objects, where possible. Change the water in bird baths at least once per week.

To report standing water at public facilities or for more information about West Nile virus, please visit halton.ca/wnv, call 311 or e-mail wnv@halton.ca.

 

 

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Burlington dental services clinic closed by Regional Health inspectors - allowed to re-open when required infection prevention and control standards were put in place.

element_healthservicesBy Staff

June 20, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

An infection prevention and control inspection conducted by the Halton Region Health Department on June 9, 2017, identified that clients who have received dental services at Upper Middle Dental operated by Dr. Vick Handa, located at 1900 Walkers Line in Burlington, Unit 4, may have been exposed to improperly cleaned instruments used for procedures.

element_healthservices“Improperly cleaned dental instruments carry a low risk of transmitting infectious diseases, such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to clients,” said Dr. Daniela Kempkens, Acting Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region. “As a precaution, the Halton Region Health Department recommends that all clients who have ever received dental services at Upper Middle Dental contact their physician (or go to a walk-in clinic if they do not have a physician) to discuss testing for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).”

The Halton Region Health Department closed Upper Middle Dental. In addition, the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario (RCDSO) suspended Dr. Handa’s license to practice on June 12. A re-inspection by Health Department staff on June 14 confirmed that the dental office now meets the required infection prevention and control standards.

On June 16, the suspension was lifted by the RCDSO. The Halton Region Health Department has sent letters to past and current clients of the dental office to notify them and recommend they contact their physician.
“Infection prevention and control in dentistry is a critical issue for safe patient care,” said a spokesperson for the

RCDSO. “As a result, cases like this are extremely rare. Dentists are extensively trained on infection prevention and our mandatory continuous education program makes the subject a priority. The RCDSO is currently reviewing its Guidelines on Infection Prevention and Control in the Dental Office.”

For more information about hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV, the inspection or investigation, please visit halton.ca or call the Halton Region Health Department at 311, 905-825-6000 or toll free 1-866-442-5866. For inquiries related specifically to Upper Middle Dental, please contact the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario by visiting rcdso.org.

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Hospital gets $2.5 million from the province so you can get in and out of the place faster.

jbhhealth (2)By Staff

May 10th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Liberal government is delivering on their budget promises and sending Cabinet Ministers out into the field to spread the good news.

McMahon getting flu shot Dec 16-15

Burlington MP Eleanor McMahon announced that the Joseph Brant hospital was to get $2.5. McMahon’s flu shot – she got that at a local pharmacy.

That got Burlington MPP Eleanor McMahon over to the hospital this morning to make the announcement and chat things up with — Eric Vandewall, President and CEO of Joseph Brant Hospital who said: “Joseph Brant Hospital welcomes the news of receiving an additional $2.5 million in funding, a 2.10% increase to invest in frontline care and enhance patient experience. This funding will ensure that important health care services and programs are maintained for the residents of Burlington and the surrounding area.”

Bit of a mix up with the numbers: Vandewall said the money was a 2.5% increase while the Minister, in her release puts it at 3.1% – not exactly chump change when we are talking in millions.

Vandewall Eric

Eric Vandewall, President and CEO of Joseph Brant Hospital

Vandewall, the highest paid civil servant in Burlington earns more than twice what we pay McMahon. He however has to pay for his parking; she gets to use a limo to dive her around from time to time.

Public service does have its perks.

The media release tells us that: “The Joseph Brant Hospital is getting an additional $2.5 million that will provide faster access to health care, expand crucial services and procedures, and improve the experience of patients.

“This investment in Burlington is part of a 3.1 per cent increase in hospital funding in the 2017 Budget to directly benefit patients at every public hospital across Ontario, and will:

Provide more access to cardiac services, critical care, organ/tissue donations and transplants, rare disease care, and bariatric services, as well as support for new and redeveloped hospitals

Improve access and reduce wait times for chemotherapy, stroke treatments, hip and knee replacements, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRIs)

Support service delivery by hospitals in high-growth communities, as well as small, medium, northern and rural hospitals, and mental health and stand-alone paediatric hospitals.

Ontario is increasing access to care, reducing wait times and improving the patient experience through its Patients First Action Plan for Health Care and OHIP+: Children and Youth Pharmacare – protecting health care today and into the future.

The new patient tower at Burlington’s Joseph Brant Hospital is nearing completion and will be officially opened on August 21st. This is a long awaited modernization of a hospital that has had its problems in the past.

An architects rendering of the new entrance to the Joseph Brant Hospital whch will now face the lake. The entrance will be off LAkeshore Road with the new parking lot just to the west of the hospital.

An architects rendering of the new entrance to the Joseph Brant Hospital which will now face the lake. The entrance will be off Lakeshore Road with the new parking lot just to the west of the hospital.

The patient tower is part of the hospital’s more-than-$350-million redevelopment and expansion.

Join the J Aerial-shot-reduced

On a rain soaked day 2334 people gathered in Spencer Smith Park to try and break a Guinness world record for creating the largest human letter. It was a valiant effort – and the weather was the pits.

The city of Burlington had to come up with $60 million of that money with the Joseph Brant Hospital Foundation raising an additional $60 million.

The redevelopment will house the new emergency department, cancer clinic, and intensive care unit, as well as operating rooms, and recovery and inpatient units.

It is a very smart looking building.

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Aldershot high school students learn CPR and how to use a defibrillator

News 100 blueBy Staff

May 1, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is an organization called the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation that partners with high schools to teach the fundamentals of CPR and AED.

What do the acronyms mean?

CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is a combination of breathing and chest compressions. Performing CPR increases a cardiac arrest casualty’s chances of survival by keeping the brain supplied with oxygen until the person receives advanced medical care.

AED stands for Automated External Defibrillator. An AED sends an electric shock through the chest to the heart to start the heard beating effectively again. Defibrillation given as soon as possible is the key to helping some people survive cardiac arrest.

CPR - doing compressios

Aldershot high school students being taught how to apply CPR and how to use an AED.

There are 28 high schools in Halton taking the training that will result in 7000 students empowered by their teachers with essential lifesaving skills every year. The media event for this program took place t Aldershot High School,

CPR mascot gts involved

The high school mascot gets into the training.

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools throughout Ontario and across Canada. Mannequins and defibrillator training units are donated to schools and high school teachers are trained as instructors to train all students prior to graduation.

When used in conjunction with CPR in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest, defibrillation can dramatically improve cardiac arrest survival rates by more than 50 per cent. Providing youth with the tools and confidence to intervene in a life-saving scenario is an important investment that will benefit everyone.

CPR - ready to usse AED

One student does CPR while a second students prepares the defibrillator.

This initiative will see high schools receive training equipment as a result of the Skills4Life Fundraising Campaign which has received the support of many community partners and service clubs. These include lead community partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada, and Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd. Community partners are: Bayer, Halton Hills Hydro Inc., Kiwanis Club of Oakville Inc., Oakville Lions Club, Rotary Club of Acton, Rotary Club of Burlington Central, Rotary Club of Burlington Lakeshore, Rotary Club of Burlington North, Rotary Club of Oakville Trafalgar, and Takeda Canada Inc.

More than 700 CPR mannequins are being donated to high schools along with 85 defibrillator training units.

With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

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New Medical Wellness Center opens - gala launch.

eventspink 100x100By Pepper Parr

April 28th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It is going to be a whole new product line.

Media were invited to check out – a new truly comprehensive Medical Wellness Center.

Dr. Ira Price, internationally renowned for expertise in cannabinoid medicine is announcing a new Synergy Health Services clinic to serve Burlington area patients. An exciting new concept, the new clinic truly is a comprehensive Medical Wellness Center, adding vape yoga, massage, acupuncture, exercise therapy and a ground-breaking Cannabis Exploration Center to the Synergy model.

Marijuana educationWe were invited to join them for a gala to celebrate! We were to be treated to kombucha samples (including a special Kombucha Martini made by a guest mixologist!), wine and beer tasting, and tasty organic treats by Green Bar, Hamilton’s vegan cafe.

Catering was to be provided by JONNY BLONDE, a celebrated local eatery known for its chef inspired, locally farmed, anti-biotic-free ethical eats.

Members of the local business community who donated many great prizes for the exciting raffles that were to take place throughout the evening were going to be on hand.

This had the look of a great evening; something to talk about for weeks.

marijuana-dispensary-holding-weed-1280

It is going to be a whole new product line.

Dr. Price seems to have come to term with the three-month suspension for misconduct given to him by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, for altering a medical record and misleading a college investigator.

Synergy Health Services’ website lists Price as an assistant clinical professor, Division of Emergency Medicine, at McMaster University.

We weren’t able to “celebrate this innovative new addition to the Burlington health landscape” – we had to work the next day.

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Off duty fire fighter saves the life of a resident who collapsed at Appleby Arena. A defibrillator was used to shock the resident.

News 100 redBy Staff

April 3rd, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Mark Kippin, an acting captain with the Burlington Fire Department, was recently recognized for saving a life while playing a hockey game at Appleby Ice Centre.

CaptMarkKippin-CoinRec1 March2017

Acting Caption Mark Kippin holds a Challenge Coin which recognizes contributions to public safety, customer service and firefighter safety.

Kippin, who was off duty at the time, began early CPR with help from a teammate and used the arena’s public access defibrillator to deliver a shock to a resident who had collapsed.

“I was on the ice when I saw people running toward the change room and then I heard the call for help. Thankfully 911 was called right away and they quickly brought over the defibrillator as we started CPR. After the first shock, we got a pulse and stabilized him until the paramedics arrived.”

“I suppose I was in the right place at the right time. Without quick intervention and access to AEDs, these kinds of situations may have fewer positive outcomes.”

Halton Region’s Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) program places Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) in public locations where there is a chance someone could suffer a cardiac arrest. Many of Burlington’s city facilities have AEDs.

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A confirmed case of measles in our community make it imperative that residents protect themselves against the increasing risk of infection by ensuring their immunization are up to date.

element_healthservices-74x74By Staff

March 31st, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Region Health Department is investigating a confirmed case of measles in an Oakville resident that has led to potential exposures in public and health-care settings in Oakville during the period of March 21-29, 2017.

Measles - male

Anyone who has not had two doses of a measles vaccine (MMR or MMRV) or who has not had measles in the past is at risk of infection.

People who have visited any of the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

• Tuesday, March 21, Sheridan College, 1430 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville, 6 –11:30p.m.

• Thursday, March 23, Sheridan College, including the gym and campus Tim Hortons,

1430 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville, 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

• Thursday, March 23, Walmart (Oakville), 234 Hays Blvd., Oakville, 3:30 – 10:30 p.m.

• Sunday, March 26, Tim Hortons, 2355 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.

• Tuesday, March 28, Trafalgar Medical Clinic, including the main foyer, the food court and LifeLabs in the basement, 1235 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville, 1:30 – 5:00 p.m.

• Wednesday, March 29, Tim Hortons, 2355 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville, 3:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Visitors to these locations during the times noted should do the following:

A severe case of measles.

A severe case of measles.

• Check your immunization records to make sure you and your children have had two doses of the measles vaccine (MMR or MMRV). Your immunization record (yellow card) or your doctor can provide you with this information. Two doses of measles vaccine are recommended for anyone born after 1969.

• Infants under one year of age, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems can get very ill with measles and should contact Halton Region Health Department or their health care professional immediately for further assessment.

• Watch for symptoms of measles until 21 days after exposure. These include a high fever, cold-like symptoms (cough/runny nose); sore eyes or sensitivity to light; small spots with a white centre on the inside of the mouth; and a red rash lasting four to seven days.

• If you think you may have measles and need to see a doctor, you must call ahead to the doctor’s office, walk-in clinic or emergency department. This will allow health care staff to take the necessary precautions to reduce the risk of infection and protect others visiting the office, clinic or hospital.

“With a case of confirmed measles in our community, it’s imperative that residents protect themselves and their community against the increasing risk of infection by ensuring their measles immunization is up to date,” said Dr. Julie Emili, Acting Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region.

Measles is a highly contagious disease that spreads easily through the air. Anyone who has not had two doses of a measles vaccine (MMR or MMRV) or who has not had measles in the past is at risk of infection.

For more information, dial 311 or call the Halton Region Health Department at 905-825-6000, toll free 1-866-442-5866 or visit halton.ca/measles.

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Ten confirmed cases of rabies in raccoons in less than a year.

News 100 redBy Staff

March 20th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There have been 10 confirmed cases of raccoon strain rabies found in three skunks and seven raccoons in Burlington since October of 2016.

The city is co-operating with Halton Region Health Department and reminding residents of things they can do to help protect themselves and their pets from the threat of rabies.

racoons

They are cute to look at but when rabid these are very dangerous animals. Caution your children.

There is a point at which raccoons are cute – when they are infected they are very dangerous.

About rabies
Rabies is a viral disease that causes severe damage to the brain and spinal cord and, if untreated before symptoms appear, will lead to death. The virus is spread through the saliva of an infected animal, usually entering through a bite or scratch.

After someone is exposed to rabies, timely use of the rabies vaccine can prevent the rabies illness. While the rabies vaccine is extremely effective if it is administered before any symptoms occur, there are a number of things you can do to protect your family and pets from the threat of rabies:

rabid-racoon

A rabid raccoon.

• Avoid all contact with raccoons, skunks and other wild animals
• Seek medical attention immediately if you come in contact with a raccoon, skunk or other potentially rabid animals
• Report all animal bites or scratches to the Halton Region Health Department
• Warn your children to stay away from any wild, stray or aggressive animals
• Do not touch dead or sick animals
• Do not feed or keep wild animals as pets
• Make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date
• Keep your pet on a leash when off your property
• Ensure pets that have come in contact with a raccoon or other wild animal are seen by a veterinarian.

This is a serious health issue – children tend to get curious with animals. Not knowing that it might be very sick.
Caution your children.

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Is a health plan that includes pharmaceuticals part of a federal plan?

element_healthservicesBy Jay Fallis

March 13th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

My grandfather led a very healthy life. He exercised every day, followed a strict diet, and only ate chocolate ice cream once a year. At the age of 94, doctors were in awe of the fact that he did not take prescription drugs.

His story is certainly unique. For most of us, prescription drugs, are, or will become, essential for treating illness or physical ailments.

However, for many Canadians, prescriptions are difficult to come by. Stories of patients re-using needles and parents having to choose which child to buy medication for have become all too common in this country.

Unnecessary struggles of this nature lead one to ponder why Canada does not have some form of a universal drug plan.

It seems that politicians in Ottawa have begun to question this as well. In recent months the Standing Committee on Health began discussing the possibility of developing some form of a National Pharmacare Program, and began to look at what such a program might entail. To understand the committee’s progress so far and the issue a little further, I spoke with a member of the Health Committee and Oakville MP, John Oliver.

To start, Oliver discussed Canada’s unique situation.

“Canada is one of the few countries that has a comprehensive universal healthcare plan that doesn’t include pharmaceuticals outside of hospital care. In our current plan today you are [treated] in hospital care, but the minute you are discharged you have to pay for those drugs out of your pocket or through a private insurance plan.”

He went on to suggest that this presents a serious problem for many Canadians

“About 10% of Canadians do not have any form of drug coverage and are unable to afford medications. So about 10% of Canadians show up, have a prescription to fill and they cannot fill it because of unaffordability.”

However, Oliver was clear that this problem was not just limited to those who didn’t have drug coverage.

“Many Canadians have insurance through their employment. But, those private coverage plans are becoming increasingly expensive as new drugs emerge… I’ve heard from inside the industry that there is a concern that private companies won’t be able to continue to afford a drug benefit plan for their employees.” He said.

Essentially, it won’t just be unemployed Canadians who will continue to suffer from a non-existent public pharmaceutical plan. Even those who have pharmaceutical coverage plans through their jobs could be forced to pay for expensive medical treatment themselves.

There are, of course, alternatives used around the world in response to such a harsh reality. Among them is the model used in New Zealand, on which the Health Committee recently heard testimony.

“I think in New Zealand there is a $5 fee that you pay regardless of the value of the drug.” Oliver said.
He went on to describe New Zealand’s model in more detail.

“We did hear that one of the potential downsides of a universal pharma care plan for certain drugs was that there can be delays introducing the drug and making it available to the [distributors] because it’s going through an economic benefit evaluation.”

However, Oliver suggested that despite these occasional delays, New Zealanders appreciate the system.

“There are a lot of left and right leaning political parties in New Zealand. So I asked would any party run on a platform to do away with universal pharmacare coverage and the answer we got was “No””.

Even though New Zealand’s pharmaceutical plan does delay the introduction of some drugs to market, the testimony, that Oliver and the rest of the committee heard, made it clear that this was a popular initiative. So much so, that all sides of the political spectrum wouldn’t dare advocate for its elimination.

Our country has so much to gain from implementing a national pharmaceutical plan. It is popular elsewhere, and it guarantees that no one will suffer because of unaffordability or lack of insurance coverage. While our government still has a long way to go in developing such a broad plan, I am reminded by Oliver’s reply as to whether this was a good time to start this discussion:

“Absolutely, I think it’s past due.”

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Raccoon strain of rabies on the up-rise in the Region - explain the danger to your children.

News 100 blueBy Staff

February 15th, 2017

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There have been ten case of raccoon strain rabies in the Region.

The Halton Region Health Department received test results from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency on February 13 confirming a case of raccoon strain rabies in a skunk found in the City of Burlington. Residents are reminding to avoid all contact with raccoons, skunks and other wild animals.

skunks

Alive they are cute – dead they could be the death of you. They can be pretty stinky as well. Just leave them alone.

Rabies is a viral disease that causes severe damage to the brain and spinal cord, and if untreated before symptoms appear will lead to death. The virus is spread through the saliva of an infected animal, usually entering through a bite or scratch.

“Anyone who comes in physical contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should see a physician immediately and contact the Health Department by dialing 311,” said Dr. Daniela Kempkens, Acting Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region. “Halton Region, as well as neighbouring communities, are experiencing a higher than average number of rabies cases and we want residents to be aware of rabies and know how to protect themselves from wild and stray animals.“

After someone is exposed to rabies, timely use of the rabies vaccine can prevent the rabies illness. While the rabies vaccine is extremely effective if it is administered before any symptoms occur, there are a number of things you can do to protect your family and pets from the threat of rabies:

• Seek medical attention immediately if you come in contact with a raccoon, skunk or other potentially rabid animals.
• Report all animal bites or scratches to the Halton Region Health Department.

• Warn your children to stay away from any wild, stray or aggressive animals.

• Do not touch dead or sick animals.

• Do not feed or keep wild animals as pets.

• Make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.

• Keep your pet on a leash when off your property.

• Any pet that has come in contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should be seen by a veterinarian.

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Resident suggest his council member isn't telling the full story on the New Street Road diet.

opinionandcommentBy Jim Barnet

December 6th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Please take time to read Councillor Jack Dennison addition to the on line petition against the Road Diet on New Street. You will see he continues to view the project through his rose coloured cycling goggles. He neglects to tell you that Denmark, a world leader in cycling, keeps bicycles and vehicles separated by barriers.

This safety requirement was made in a clear and concise fashion to a delegation from Burlington, headed by the mayor.

Mr. Toderian, a consultant hired by the city told an open meeting at the Burlington Performing Arts centre ” The road diet on New Street is a poor design and its one I would not personally use. I would fear for my safety.”

Ward 4 Councillor Jack Dennison always has an eye open for an economic opportunity - sees a great one for the city: sell the golf course.

Ward 4 Councillor Jack Dennison uses roller blades and his bicycle.

When will Jack tell about this?

Some other things that don’t get past the rose colour goggles.

A member of the cycling committee has put out a blog showing that sharrows give a cyclist a false sense of safety and should not be used.

Early data indicates that the transit time between Walkers and Guelph line has increased by 50 percent during evening rush hours and is even worse when the roadway approaches design capacity and gridlock starts to take place.

If the road diet was in place from Burloak to the Hospital, transit times on the route would be increased by close to fifteen minutes during rush hours, total capacity would be reduced and grid lock would occur more often.

Due to weather, bikes are only potentially viable five months of the year. In addition how does the hockey player strap his equipment bag on a bike?

In a meeting with Councillor Dennison he admitted that he did not have targets for the results to be judged against to measure success or failure. This is not a management style most people use.

080211_2057_Dennisontak7.jpg

Jack Dennison and his partner Jackie are avid cyclists.

Slowing speeds below 60 KPM increases green house gasses and becomes even worse in gridlock and stop and go situations. How much of an increase is Jack willing to accept when at the same time putting cyclists in a less safe environment?

The highway traffic act gives bicycles the right to use certain roadways. It also states they should stay within three feet of the shoulder and travel in single file. They are to obey all the rules of the road, yet according to Jack no tickets have been issued to cyclists in Burlington. Why is that when we know they ignore most stops signs?

We should encourage cycling. This can be done by licensing bikes that have proper reflectors, bells and lights, front and rear. Riders should be encouraged to wear clothing with reflective strips and if possible to have light coloured clothing.

Maybe some of the beatification money should have spent creating protected bike lanes that are a network rather than Hodgepodge of bits and pieces we have now.getting new - yellow

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Region and Town of Milton do a joint emergency simulation exercise - what would happen if a tornado hit Milton?

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 11th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This story took place in Milton but it is relevant to Burlington – what do we do in the event of an emergency?

Who takes the lead and what does each different part of the civic administration do? And where does the public fit into all this?

In 2014 when Burlington experienced an unprecedented flood there were people who were up to their knees in water and people a couple of streets away who were grilling burgers totally unaware that there was a major catastrophe taking place.

Flood Fairview plaza

The 2014 flood saw 199 mm of water dumped on part of the city over a four hour period – but it was so local that many people were not aware of what had happened until it was over.

The different public services were not immediately fully aware as to just how bad the situation was. At the time every senior civic official save one was out of town.

The flooding was so local that few people knew what was going on.

In an effort to be better prepared the Region took on the task of doing annual exercises to practice what might happen and how the municipality would respond.

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Halton Regional Chair Gary Carr and Halton CAO Jane MacCaskill review the tornado’s path.

On November 9, 2016, Halton Region and the Town of Milton staged a joint emergency exercise to evaluate their respective emergency response plans. The exercise included response and recovery activities related to a fictional tornado that damaged homes, businesses and community infrastructure in Milton.

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Halton Region Paramedic Services Superintendent Tom Stirling oversees EMS support for affected residents.

“Testing our emergency preparedness strategies helps ensure that we are ready to respond,” said Halton Regional Chair Gary Carr. “We work with local partners to minimize the risks, coordinate response efforts and reduce the impact of emergency situations. By training, rehearsing and preparing together, we improve our ability to keep residents safe and increase the resilience of our entire community.”

The exercise engaged Town and Regional staff, as well as representatives from the Halton Regional Police Service, Halton Paramedic Services, Burlington Fire Department and Milton Fire Department. This collaboration provided a realistic image of how community agencies would work together in the event of a real emergency.

“We know the potential for weather-related emergencies is very real and it is important that we come together with local partners to practice our response,” said Milton Mayor Gord Krantz. “This emergency exercise serves as a reminder that we all need to be prepared for the unexpected.”

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Town of Milton CAO Bill Mann and Fire Chief Brian Ellsworth assess the tornado’s impact.

Exercise “Vortex” activated a wide range of resources and procedures established by the Region and Town to address emergency situations. Participants coordinated search and rescue, evacuation, temporary shelter and service restoration, directing simulated response workers to support residents affected by the tornado. Staff from all agencies identified strengths, challenges and areas for improvement immediately following the simulation.

Halton’s annual exercises simulate severe weather events and significant crises that could occur based on the community’s environmental features and hazards. Emergencies can happen anytime, and emergency preparedness is a joint responsibility—the Region reminds residents to plan today so they are protected tomorrow.

What the really disturbs the Gazette is that, to the best of our knowledge there was no media involved in this exercise.

 

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Resident wants to know why the contractors working on the Carriage Gate development didn't know where the pipe lines are located.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 3, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Gas leaks are dangerous.

Yesterday there was a gas leak on a construction site.

The fire department and the gas company were able to get on site very quickly and shut the gas off.

A resident who was walking in the area wants to know why things like this happen.

When construction permits are issued do the contractors not know where the telephone lines are; where the gas lines are and where the water pipes are?

Carriage Gate - three buidings

The project has been a long time getting to te point where the shovels were in the ground. within a week something struck a gas pipe line shutting down the immediate area for several hours. Fast work on the part of the fire department and the gas company averted a disaster.

Our resident wants to know: What is the procedure at The City of Burlington going forward with the developer who put Downtown Core residents and businesses in jeopardy yesterday when a gas pipe was ruptured during construction at Caroline and Elizabeth Streets?

She was walking by the site when the gas pipe was hit and the concentration of gas permeating the air was dense and made it difficult to breath. She didn’t know how gas pipes and pressure work when there is a rupture, but there was gas filling businesses on Brant Street. Wardell Insurance had all of their doors open as their building filled with gas; this building is directly across from City Hall. I observed firemen taking gas readings as far south as James Street.

How is it possible that a builder can still rupture a gas line in the middle of a City with all of the technology available in 2016 for pinpointing exact location? This site is bordered by an apartment building, town homes and businesses in a highly populated and travelled part of our downtown community.

Medica One or the Carriage Gate project - pick the name you like best - will go up at the top of John Street and consist of a medical offices building, an above ground garage and an apartment/condo complex. It will bring significant change to the intersection and drive redevelopment of the plaza to the immediate north, A transit hub a couple of blocks to the south then makes a lot of sense.

Medica One or the Carriage Gate project – pick the name you like best – will go up at the top of John Street and consist of a medical offices building, an above ground garage and an apartment/condo complex. It will bring significant change to the intersection and drive redevelopment of the plaza to the immediate north, A transit hub a couple of blocks to the south then makes a lot of sense.

Is this developer capable of safely building a safe building in our midst? What are this developer’s credentials? Has this developer ever worked on a project of this scale? This is a disturbing start in the early stages of a multi-year construction at this site.

Does the developer pay the thousands of dollars for the emergency response personnel that were on site for the many hours that it took to secure the area and stop the gas leak? Is there any consideration for the businesses that either had to be evacuated or suffered loss of business?

It is absolutely terrifying to consider the consequences to our downtown community had the gas ignited.

All good questions. Watching for the answers.

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Gas leak on construction site results in some building evacuations downtown.

notices100x100By Staff

November 2, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Road closure for natural gas leak on John Street and Caroline Street

The City of Burlington Fire Department is at the scene of a natural gas leak at a construction site on John Street.

Several neighbouring buildings are being evacuated.

Roads are closed in the area of Caroline, John, Martha and James Street.

The Fire Department is recommending that all downtown buildings keep their windows closed until further notice.

carnacelli-carriage-gate-early-diggingThe beginning of construction for the Carriage Gate development that will fill the entire block of John Street, Caroline, Elizabeth and Pine has begun.

Looks like someone forgot to completely mark where the gas lines were located.

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63 year old male arrested, charged with failing to provide the necessities of life. Victim was malnourished, weak, unkempt and had been residing in soiled linens and clothing.

Crime 100By Pepper Parr

October 27, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is really a Georgetown story – but there is a lesson for all of us in this one.  We are expected to take care of each other.

On October 5th, 2016 Halton Region Paramedic Services were summoned to a Georgetown address by Community Care and Access Centre staff to assess a 91 year old female client requiring medical assistance. The female patient was subsequently transported to Georgetown Hospital.

It was determined that the victim was suffering from the ill effects of not receiving proper care. She was malnourished, weak, unkempt and had been residing in soiled linens and clothing. Halton Regional Police Services were contacted and the One District Criminal Investigations Bureau conducted an investigation.

As a result, on October 25th, 2016 a 63 year old man from Georgetown was arrested and charged with failing to provide the necessities of life.

HRPS crest“The elderly victim was found living in deplorable conditions. This was an excellent example of team work and collaboration between the internal resources of the police service and external partners. The Halton Regional Police Community Mobilization Bureau and Criminal Investigations Bureau, Seniors Liaison Team along with Halton Paramedic Services and the Community Care Access Centre worked together in bringing this investigation to a successful conclusion,” said Detective Sergeant Dave Costantini.  “More importantly, because of this collaboration a vulnerable member of our community has been rescued from unthinkable conditions and I am happy to report she is expected to make a full recovery.”

Section 215 of the Criminal Code of Canada says it is an offence if an individual fails to provide necessaries of life to a person under his or her charge.  Specifically subsection (C)(i) states, “if that person is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to withdraw himself from that charge.”

Detective Sergeant Costantini summarized; “This means it is a criminal offence if you do not provide the necessary care to someone that is in your care and that cannot leave your care due to their age, illness or other cause. The necessaries of life refer to those things necessary to preserve life, such as food, shelter, medical attention and protection from harm.”

Anyone who may have information that would assist investigators in this case are encouraged to contact D/C Sarah McCullagh – Seniors Liaison Investigator  at 905-78-5511 ext: 2419 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).getting new - yellow

 

 

 

 

 

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Flu shot time - at your Doctor's office or at most local pharmacies.

News 100 redBy Staff

October 24, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It is that time of year again – needle in the arm. The province is reminding people to protect themselves and get their flu shot.

The free flu vaccine will be available in Ontario starting this week, so that people can better protect themselves against the flu virus and stay healthy.

McMahon getting flu shot Dec 16-15

Burlington MPP Eleanor McMahon, and now Minister of Tourism, Sport and Culture getting her flu shot last year.

The vaccine will be available at doctor’s offices, local public health units and community immunization clinics. Anyone five years of age and older can also be vaccinated for free by trained pharmacists at approximately 2,600 pharmacies across the province.

Influenza is a serious respiratory infection that can lead to hospitalization and even death. It’s important to get the flu shot every year to protect yourself, and those around you. Children under five, pregnant women and seniors are especially at risk of getting seriously ill from the flu. The vaccine is very safe and helps to protect against the most common strains of the virus.

People are also reminded to take everyday measures to protect themselves from the flu:

• Clean your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• Cough and sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve, not your hand
• Clean and disinfect surfaces often, such as countertops, telephones and keyboards; flu viruses can live on surfaces for up to eight hours

In 2015-16, approximately 2,500 participating pharmacies administered more than 869,000 doses of publicly funded influenza vaccine.

The flu vaccine is offered free of charge to anyone over the age of six months who either lives, works, or goes to school in Ontario.

Children and youth between the ages of five and 17 years can get the flu vaccine as an injection or nasal spray at a health care provider’s office, local public health unit or at a participating pharmacy.

Kids under five years of age must get the flu vaccine at a health care provider’s office or participating public health unit.

Burlington MPP Jane McKenna gets her annual flu shot from Anita Sahu at the Rexall Pharmacy on Guelph Line.

Former Burlington MPP Jane McKenna got her annual flu shot from Anita Sahu at the Rexall Pharmacy on Guelph Line.

A number of years ago when this program was introduced the Gazette went along to one of the pharmacies giving the free flu shots.  Jane McKenna was the MPP at the time.  when she arrived at the pharmacy she said hello and asked why I was there and I said I was going to take a picture of her getting her flue shot. “You know they put the needle into your bum – don’t you – and that’s the picture I want.  McKenna’s jaw dropped but her daughter, who was with her took the fun out of the comment when she said: “Mom – he’s pulling your leg.”

 

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Halton Region Health Department confirms second case of raccoon rabies in Burlington

News 100 redBy Staff

October 20th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Region Health Department reports a second confirmed case rabies in a raccoon found in the City of Burlington.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency provided the data. The Health Department is reminding residents to avoid all contact with raccoons and other wild animals.

Rabies is a viral disease that causes severe damage to the brain and spinal cord, and if untreated before symptoms appear will lead to death. The virus is spread through the saliva of an infected animal, usually entering through a bite or scratch.

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Cute – but not when they are infected with rabies.

“Anyone who comes in physical contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should see a physician immediately and contact the Health Department by dialing 311,” said Dr. Hamidah Meghani, Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region. “After someone is exposed to rabies, timely use of the rabies vaccine can prevent the rabies illness. The rabies vaccine is extremely effective if it is administered before any symptoms occur.”

While this is only the second confirmed case of raccoon rabies in Halton in 2016, the Health Department wants to remind residents that there have been a higher than average number of cases reported in areas neighbouring the region and that precautions should be taken when you see wild animals. There are a number of things you can do to protect your family and pets:

Make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.
• Warn your children to stay away from any wild, stray or aggressive animals.
• Do not touch dead or sick animals.
• Do not feed or keep wild animals as pets.
• Keep your pet on a leash when off your property.
• Seek medical attention immediately if you come in contact with a raccoon or other potentially rabid animals.
• Any pet that has come in contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should be seen by a veterinarian.
• Report all animal bites or scratches to the Halton Region Health Department.

For more information on rabies or to learn about positive raccoon rabies results in Halton, visit halton.ca/rabies or call the Halton Region Health Department by dialing 311.

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