Region and Town of Milton do a joint emergency simulation exercise - what would happen if a tornado hit Milton?

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 11th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This story took place in Milton but it is relevant to Burlington – what do we do in the event of an emergency?

Who takes the lead and what does each different part of the civic administration do? And where does the public fit into all this?

In 2014 when Burlington experienced an unprecedented flood there were people who were up to their knees in water and people a couple of streets away who were grilling burgers totally unaware that there was a major catastrophe taking place.

Flood Fairview plaza

The 2014 flood saw 199 mm of water dumped on part of the city over a four hour period – but it was so local that many people were not aware of what had happened until it was over.

The different public services were not immediately fully aware as to just how bad the situation was. At the time every senior civic official save one was out of town.

The flooding was so local that few people knew what was going on.

In an effort to be better prepared the Region took on the task of doing annual exercises to practice what might happen and how the municipality would respond.

emo-exercise-photo-1

Halton Regional Chair Gary Carr and Halton CAO Jane MacCaskill review the tornado’s path.

On November 9, 2016, Halton Region and the Town of Milton staged a joint emergency exercise to evaluate their respective emergency response plans. The exercise included response and recovery activities related to a fictional tornado that damaged homes, businesses and community infrastructure in Milton.

emo-exercise-photo-4

Halton Region Paramedic Services Superintendent Tom Stirling oversees EMS support for affected residents.

“Testing our emergency preparedness strategies helps ensure that we are ready to respond,” said Halton Regional Chair Gary Carr. “We work with local partners to minimize the risks, coordinate response efforts and reduce the impact of emergency situations. By training, rehearsing and preparing together, we improve our ability to keep residents safe and increase the resilience of our entire community.”

The exercise engaged Town and Regional staff, as well as representatives from the Halton Regional Police Service, Halton Paramedic Services, Burlington Fire Department and Milton Fire Department. This collaboration provided a realistic image of how community agencies would work together in the event of a real emergency.

“We know the potential for weather-related emergencies is very real and it is important that we come together with local partners to practice our response,” said Milton Mayor Gord Krantz. “This emergency exercise serves as a reminder that we all need to be prepared for the unexpected.”

emo-exercise-photo-2

Town of Milton CAO Bill Mann and Fire Chief Brian Ellsworth assess the tornado’s impact.

Exercise “Vortex” activated a wide range of resources and procedures established by the Region and Town to address emergency situations. Participants coordinated search and rescue, evacuation, temporary shelter and service restoration, directing simulated response workers to support residents affected by the tornado. Staff from all agencies identified strengths, challenges and areas for improvement immediately following the simulation.

Halton’s annual exercises simulate severe weather events and significant crises that could occur based on the community’s environmental features and hazards. Emergencies can happen anytime, and emergency preparedness is a joint responsibility—the Region reminds residents to plan today so they are protected tomorrow.

What the really disturbs the Gazette is that, to the best of our knowledge there was no media involved in this exercise.

 

Return to the Front page

Resident wants to know why the contractors working on the Carriage Gate development didn't know where the pipe lines are located.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 3, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Gas leaks are dangerous.

Yesterday there was a gas leak on a construction site.

The fire department and the gas company were able to get on site very quickly and shut the gas off.

A resident who was walking in the area wants to know why things like this happen.

When construction permits are issued do the contractors not know where the telephone lines are; where the gas lines are and where the water pipes are?

Carriage Gate - three buidings

The project has been a long time getting to te point where the shovels were in the ground. within a week something struck a gas pipe line shutting down the immediate area for several hours. Fast work on the part of the fire department and the gas company averted a disaster.

Our resident wants to know: What is the procedure at The City of Burlington going forward with the developer who put Downtown Core residents and businesses in jeopardy yesterday when a gas pipe was ruptured during construction at Caroline and Elizabeth Streets?

She was walking by the site when the gas pipe was hit and the concentration of gas permeating the air was dense and made it difficult to breath. She didn’t know how gas pipes and pressure work when there is a rupture, but there was gas filling businesses on Brant Street. Wardell Insurance had all of their doors open as their building filled with gas; this building is directly across from City Hall. I observed firemen taking gas readings as far south as James Street.

How is it possible that a builder can still rupture a gas line in the middle of a City with all of the technology available in 2016 for pinpointing exact location? This site is bordered by an apartment building, town homes and businesses in a highly populated and travelled part of our downtown community.

Medica One or the Carriage Gate project - pick the name you like best - will go up at the top of John Street and consist of a medical offices building, an above ground garage and an apartment/condo complex. It will bring significant change to the intersection and drive redevelopment of the plaza to the immediate north, A transit hub a couple of blocks to the south then makes a lot of sense.

Medica One or the Carriage Gate project – pick the name you like best – will go up at the top of John Street and consist of a medical offices building, an above ground garage and an apartment/condo complex. It will bring significant change to the intersection and drive redevelopment of the plaza to the immediate north, A transit hub a couple of blocks to the south then makes a lot of sense.

Is this developer capable of safely building a safe building in our midst? What are this developer’s credentials? Has this developer ever worked on a project of this scale? This is a disturbing start in the early stages of a multi-year construction at this site.

Does the developer pay the thousands of dollars for the emergency response personnel that were on site for the many hours that it took to secure the area and stop the gas leak? Is there any consideration for the businesses that either had to be evacuated or suffered loss of business?

It is absolutely terrifying to consider the consequences to our downtown community had the gas ignited.

All good questions. Watching for the answers.

Return to the Front page

Gas leak on construction site results in some building evacuations downtown.

notices100x100By Staff

November 2, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Road closure for natural gas leak on John Street and Caroline Street

The City of Burlington Fire Department is at the scene of a natural gas leak at a construction site on John Street.

Several neighbouring buildings are being evacuated.

Roads are closed in the area of Caroline, John, Martha and James Street.

The Fire Department is recommending that all downtown buildings keep their windows closed until further notice.

carnacelli-carriage-gate-early-diggingThe beginning of construction for the Carriage Gate development that will fill the entire block of John Street, Caroline, Elizabeth and Pine has begun.

Looks like someone forgot to completely mark where the gas lines were located.

Return to the Front page

63 year old male arrested, charged with failing to provide the necessities of life. Victim was malnourished, weak, unkempt and had been residing in soiled linens and clothing.

Crime 100By Pepper Parr

October 27, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

 

This is really a Georgetown story – but there is a lesson for all of us in this one.  We are expected to take care of each other.

On October 5th, 2016 Halton Region Paramedic Services were summoned to a Georgetown address by Community Care and Access Centre staff to assess a 91 year old female client requiring medical assistance. The female patient was subsequently transported to Georgetown Hospital.

It was determined that the victim was suffering from the ill effects of not receiving proper care. She was malnourished, weak, unkempt and had been residing in soiled linens and clothing. Halton Regional Police Services were contacted and the One District Criminal Investigations Bureau conducted an investigation.

As a result, on October 25th, 2016 a 63 year old man from Georgetown was arrested and charged with failing to provide the necessities of life.

HRPS crest“The elderly victim was found living in deplorable conditions. This was an excellent example of team work and collaboration between the internal resources of the police service and external partners. The Halton Regional Police Community Mobilization Bureau and Criminal Investigations Bureau, Seniors Liaison Team along with Halton Paramedic Services and the Community Care Access Centre worked together in bringing this investigation to a successful conclusion,” said Detective Sergeant Dave Costantini.  “More importantly, because of this collaboration a vulnerable member of our community has been rescued from unthinkable conditions and I am happy to report she is expected to make a full recovery.”

Section 215 of the Criminal Code of Canada says it is an offence if an individual fails to provide necessaries of life to a person under his or her charge.  Specifically subsection (C)(i) states, “if that person is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to withdraw himself from that charge.”

Detective Sergeant Costantini summarized; “This means it is a criminal offence if you do not provide the necessary care to someone that is in your care and that cannot leave your care due to their age, illness or other cause. The necessaries of life refer to those things necessary to preserve life, such as food, shelter, medical attention and protection from harm.”

Anyone who may have information that would assist investigators in this case are encouraged to contact D/C Sarah McCullagh – Seniors Liaison Investigator  at 905-78-5511 ext: 2419 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).getting new - yellow

 

 

 

 

 

Return to the Front page

Flu shot time - at your Doctor's office or at most local pharmacies.

News 100 redBy Staff

October 24, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It is that time of year again – needle in the arm. The province is reminding people to protect themselves and get their flu shot.

The free flu vaccine will be available in Ontario starting this week, so that people can better protect themselves against the flu virus and stay healthy.

McMahon getting flu shot Dec 16-15

Burlington MPP Eleanor McMahon, and now Minister of Tourism, Sport and Culture getting her flu shot last year.

The vaccine will be available at doctor’s offices, local public health units and community immunization clinics. Anyone five years of age and older can also be vaccinated for free by trained pharmacists at approximately 2,600 pharmacies across the province.

Influenza is a serious respiratory infection that can lead to hospitalization and even death. It’s important to get the flu shot every year to protect yourself, and those around you. Children under five, pregnant women and seniors are especially at risk of getting seriously ill from the flu. The vaccine is very safe and helps to protect against the most common strains of the virus.

People are also reminded to take everyday measures to protect themselves from the flu:

• Clean your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• Cough and sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve, not your hand
• Clean and disinfect surfaces often, such as countertops, telephones and keyboards; flu viruses can live on surfaces for up to eight hours

In 2015-16, approximately 2,500 participating pharmacies administered more than 869,000 doses of publicly funded influenza vaccine.

The flu vaccine is offered free of charge to anyone over the age of six months who either lives, works, or goes to school in Ontario.

Children and youth between the ages of five and 17 years can get the flu vaccine as an injection or nasal spray at a health care provider’s office, local public health unit or at a participating pharmacy.

Kids under five years of age must get the flu vaccine at a health care provider’s office or participating public health unit.

Burlington MPP Jane McKenna gets her annual flu shot from Anita Sahu at the Rexall Pharmacy on Guelph Line.

Former Burlington MPP Jane McKenna got her annual flu shot from Anita Sahu at the Rexall Pharmacy on Guelph Line.

A number of years ago when this program was introduced the Gazette went along to one of the pharmacies giving the free flu shots.  Jane McKenna was the MPP at the time.  when she arrived at the pharmacy she said hello and asked why I was there and I said I was going to take a picture of her getting her flue shot. “You know they put the needle into your bum – don’t you – and that’s the picture I want.  McKenna’s jaw dropped but her daughter, who was with her took the fun out of the comment when she said: “Mom – he’s pulling your leg.”

 

Return to the Front page

Halton Region Health Department confirms second case of raccoon rabies in Burlington

News 100 redBy Staff

October 20th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Region Health Department reports a second confirmed case rabies in a raccoon found in the City of Burlington.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency provided the data. The Health Department is reminding residents to avoid all contact with raccoons and other wild animals.

Rabies is a viral disease that causes severe damage to the brain and spinal cord, and if untreated before symptoms appear will lead to death. The virus is spread through the saliva of an infected animal, usually entering through a bite or scratch.

abid-raccoon-attack

Cute – but not when they are infected with rabies.

“Anyone who comes in physical contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should see a physician immediately and contact the Health Department by dialing 311,” said Dr. Hamidah Meghani, Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region. “After someone is exposed to rabies, timely use of the rabies vaccine can prevent the rabies illness. The rabies vaccine is extremely effective if it is administered before any symptoms occur.”

While this is only the second confirmed case of raccoon rabies in Halton in 2016, the Health Department wants to remind residents that there have been a higher than average number of cases reported in areas neighbouring the region and that precautions should be taken when you see wild animals. There are a number of things you can do to protect your family and pets:

Make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.
• Warn your children to stay away from any wild, stray or aggressive animals.
• Do not touch dead or sick animals.
• Do not feed or keep wild animals as pets.
• Keep your pet on a leash when off your property.
• Seek medical attention immediately if you come in contact with a raccoon or other potentially rabid animals.
• Any pet that has come in contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should be seen by a veterinarian.
• Report all animal bites or scratches to the Halton Region Health Department.

For more information on rabies or to learn about positive raccoon rabies results in Halton, visit halton.ca/rabies or call the Halton Region Health Department by dialing 311.

Return to the Front page

Rabid racoon found in the Region - first confirmed case this year.

News 100 redBy Staff

October 7th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Halton Region Health Department received test results from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency on October 4 confirming a case of rabies in a raccoon found in Burlington. The Health Department is reminding residents to avoid all contact with raccoons and other wild animals.

Rabies is a viral disease that causes severe damage to the brain and spinal cord, and if untreated before symptoms appear will lead to death. The virus is spread through the saliva of an infected animal, usually entering through a bite or scratch.

abid-raccoon-attack

This raccoon is infected with rabies.

“Anyone who comes in physical contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should see a physician immediately and contact the Health Department by dialing 311,” said Dr. Hamidah Meghani, Medical Officer of Health for Halton Region. “After someone is exposed to rabies, timely use of the rabies vaccine can prevent the rabies illness. The rabies vaccine is extremely effective if it is administered before any symptoms occur.”

There are a number of things you can do to protect your family and pets:

• Make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.
• Warn your children to stay away from any wild, stray or aggressive animals.
• Do not touch dead or sick animals.
• Do not feed or keep wild animals as pets.
• Keep your pet on a leash when off your property.
• Seek medical attention immediately if you come in contact with a raccoon or other potentially rabid animals.
• Any pet that has come in contact with a raccoon or other wild animal should be seen by a veterinarian.
• Report all animal bites or scratches to the Halton Region Health Department.

For more information on rabies, call the Halton Region Health Department by dialing 311 or visit halton.ca/rabies.

Return to the Front page

Walk to school day takes place on Wednesday - let the kids know today because they are probably going to expect you to drive them.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

October 4th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There was a time when everyone walked to school – you met up with friends at the end of your street and you walked as a small group with your friends and learned what real gossip was all about.

Bikes-at-Beaudoin-school

Bikes parked at the Beaudoin school. This doesn’t happen every day.

When that practice came to an end – and why it came to an end is something the Gazette would invite some comment on.

Why do we insist in doing everything for our children? Are the streets of Burlington not safe?

The media release sent out by the school board uses the phrase “the need for safe places to walk”. Which streets to which schools in Burlington are unsafe?

“International Walk to School Day, October 5, began as a simple idea – children and parents, school and local officials walking to school together on a designated day. It is an energizing event, reminding everyone of the health benefits of regular daily activity, and the need for safe places to walk.”

“Suzanne Burwell, the Board’s Environmental Sustainability Coordinator says “Being active on the trip to school has a measurable effect on concentration levels”. She added that “Incorporating activity into morning routines is beneficial to the whole family, so if walking all the way isn’t feasible, consider connecting with other families to take turns walking with students, having students walk in groups or park legally a few blocks from the school, walk the rest, and start your day stress free.”

Do you get the sense that is a serious, significant commitment to convincing parents not to drive the kids to school?

I didn’t.

Return to the Front page

Halton Harvest wants to tell you all about Pumpkins to Pastries and the Trail they are on

eventspink 100x100By Staff

September 21, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Regional chair Gary Carr tasting honey on a farm tour. These days he is tasting the mood of the residents; wants to know rthat they are thinking.

Regional chair Gary Carr tasting honey on a farm tour.

“Agriculture is important to Halton, and Harvest Halton and the Pumpkins to Pastries Trail provide us with wonderful opportunities to showcase our local farmers, retailers, restaurants and attractions,” said Halton Regional Chair Gary Carr. “These events are a great way to bring family and friends together to enjoy locally-grown food and help us support our local agricultural community and our regional economy.”

The preview Harvest Halton event kicks off the start of Halton’s popular Pumpkins to Pastries Trail, running from September 12 to October 31, 2016. Join the Trail and experience the best local cuisine, on-farm markets, specialty shops, events and attractions in Halton.

Click on the LINK to see just how many stops there are along the trail or visit:  www.halton.ca/p2ptrail for the interactive online guide

pumpkins-to-pastry-trail

Click on the LINK above and play with this map interactively. Lots to do – and don’t forget the selfie contest.

This year’s Trail participants can also snap and win with Halton Region’s Selfie Contest. Simply snap a selfie on the Trail and post the picture on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #p2ptrail to enter for a chance to win a prize basket of fantastic local offerings.

Prizes will be awarded weekly and your picture could be featured on Halton’s trail gallery. Visit halton.ca/p2ptrail for contest rules and to view the gallery.getting new - yellow

 

Return to the Front page

Water main break shuts down washrooms at Ireland Park - little boys figure out their options.

notices100x100By Staff

September 19th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

You are going to have to hold it for just a little longer if you are out for a stroll at Ireland Park –

the Washrooms and Concession closed until further notice –

summer-camp-peeing

This is not Ireland Park – yet.

due to a water main break.

Return to the Front page

Can high school students become philanthropists? Foundation Board member thinks so.

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

September 19th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

An interesting idea cropped up during our interview with Tim Cestnick, the newest member of the Burlington Foundation, which most of you will remember as the former Burlington community Foundation.

New members of any board need to take a little time to settle in and get a sense as to how the board has run in the past. Tim Cestnick and Tim Hogarth go back some time – both are polished senior executive types that know how to think through problems and take a strategic look at what the objective is. And both are now board members of the Foundation. Hogarth has been on the board for a period of time.

foundation-lansberg-speakingThe Foundation recently went through a re-branding and is well into the roll out of their Mental Health Awareness work they have been doing the past two years. They have a major speaker. Michael Landsberg,  in town in October.

The number of Endowments they manage grows steadily as does the assets under administration – $10.7 million now.

The organization is readying itself for its Annual Gala that is being chaired by Rick Burgess this year. The event will be held at the Performing Arts centre on October 22nd.

foundation-gala-2016foundation-gala-dateThe Gala is a major fund raising event that covers the operational costs of the Foundation.

Every organization that relies on the public needs to constantly refresh itself and while a brand change perhaps perks things up a little, the meat is in the ideas they come forward with. And this is where Cestnick’s thoughts on just what philanthropy is all about are very relevant.

The vast majority of the people out there would say that people with a lot of money can become philanthropists – Cestnick doesn’t see it that way. He thinks we can tech people at the high school level to think in terms of being philanthropists.

“Why can’t a high school student can’t set aside a small sum each year and make that their philanthropic donation – something that would be built on each year?

We have United Way for that might be a response – and it is a good one.

If one looks at the annual Terry Fox run that takes place in Burlington every year you get a sense of how a public will take to an idea; how they will respond to something that changed the way they see the world.

young-philanthropist

Others are already involving their youth in philanthropic ventures.

Philanthropy allows that kind of thing. The United Way seeks funds to provide services. The Burlington Foundation came to the realization that we need to look at Mental Health differently and bring it in out of the cold where it wasn’t talked about – we just felt sorry for those who were experiencing bad mental health.

The Foundation now has a program in place that has people talking about mental health and what has to change in the way we deal with this now growing social problem. That hasn’t been the kind of work that organizations like the United Way are doing. This is not to take anything away from what the United Way does – we could not survived as a caring society if we did not have the United Way in place.

cestnick-cropped

Tim Cestnick newest Burlington Foundation Board member.

Tim Cestnick talks in terms of people needing to “feel” it when they are donating money. You give something up, you do without something you enjoy when you choose to make a philanthropic donation.

If I understood Tim Cestnick correctly he is interested in introducing people to the idea that there is something biblical about philanthropy and I got the impression it was something he might try to get on the Foundation agenda.

It will be interesting to see if this goes anywhere – it should.

 

Related article:

Cestnick appointed to Burlington Foundation board.

Return to the Front page

British Car Day at Bronte Park- with Burlington's Alan Harrington getting behind the wheel of a Morgan.

eventspink 100x100By Staff

September 18, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Something in the order of 1000 British motor cars covered the grassy fields at Bronte Provincial Park today as the Toronto Triumph Club hosted their 33rd annual British Car Day.

mg-red

This MG was an 80 year old model – running like a charm.

Millions of pounds of machinery from a low-end 1950 Morris Series MM to “the Rolls Royce of cars”, the Rolls Royce. And more if price is no object.

There Jaguars (or Jag-u-ars depending upon your pronunciation), Triumph, Lotus, Sunbeam, MG and Land Rovers.

morgan-front-end-three-wheeler

The close-up photo of the engine that drives the Morgan Three wheeler.

morna-3-wheel-with-ah-in-seat

Alan Harrington got behind the wheel of the Morgan Three Wheeler.

The oldest car was a 1933 Morgan 3 wheeler painted a very light sky-blue.

The owner has had the car for 50 years.  It seats two but the passenger on the left has to help with left/right hand signals.

yellow-ford

Fords Yellow 1994 TVR Griffith 500

Getting in and out of this “no-door” three wheeler is a minor task even for a yoga master.
There were Marcos, Bentley, Hillman, Daimler, BMW’s and Fords Yellow 1994 TVR Griffith 500 (lic UK)

At the back of the field are a dozen DeLoreans lined up gull-wing to gull-wing. DMC was the star of the Back to the Future film and one was decked out with the flux capacitor. DeLoreans were made in Northern Ireland that allows them to join all the other British made vehicles.

rolls-royce-with-food

The Rolls Royce with a table in the rear Harrington was quite taken with the Grey Poupon mustard.

land-rover

The trusty Land Rover that really didn’t need the Union Jack to show its British pedigree.

Alan Harrington, who is a regular at this annual event, managed to get himself behind the wheel of the Morgan; getting out was apparently a bit of a challenge.

Cars on display with anniversary years included MG TA Midget and Triumph Vitesse (80 years)  the RED one in the photo  and Morris Minor 1000 (60 years), cream coloured in the background of the photo with the gentleman with fancy hosiery.

delorean-used-in-movie

The DeLorean was used in the Back to the Future film and one was decked out with the flux capacitor.

Comment from a reader: “Land Rover that didn’t need the British flag…” was really a second world war Willys MB made in Toledo, Ohio. The Land Rover and the Austin Gypsy were England’s answer to the Willys Jeep, which was the original. The role it played in defending England from Nazi tyranny is apparently good enough to allow it into this all-British event, and I enjoy seeing them displayed. Incidentally, the Land Rover display was the largest I have ever seen and also very enjoyable.

The music played during the event was was all 60’s British Invasion music; the treat for the nose was the faint whiff of incomplete gasoline combustion.

Food was available for the other senses.

All the photographs were taken by Harrington, except for the one of him in the Morgan – that was taken by Dave smith, the owner of the vehicle.

Back to the Future film and one was decked out with the flux

The show is an annual event – takes place the third Sunday of September –  website  –
https://www.torontotriumph.com/BCD/

Return to the Front page

The first reported human case of of WNV has been reported to the Region's Medical Officer of Health.

News 100 blueBy Staff

September 15, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A Halton resident has tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV).

This is the first reported human case of of WNV reported to the Region’s Medical Officer of Health this year.

The Halton Region Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Hamidah Meghani , advises residents to protect themselves against mosquito bites and remove mosquito breeding sites

WestNileVirus_transmission“While 80 per cent of people infected with West Nile virus will have no symptoms, others will have West Nile fever consisting of fever, headache, muscle ache and a rash. If residents are concerned or experiencing symptoms, I would encourage them to visit their health care professional.”

Urban areas are more likely to have mosquitoes that carry WNV. The types of mosquitoes that transmit WNV to humans most commonly breed in urban areas and in places that hold standing water such as bird baths, plant pots, old toys, and tires.

Residents are encouraged to take the following steps to protect themselves and their families from mosquitoes:

• Cover up. Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved shirts and pants with tightly-woven fabric.

• Avoid being outdoors from early evening to morning when mosquitoes are most active and likely to bite, as well as at any time in shady, wooded areas.

• Reduce mosquito breeding sites around your home by getting rid of all water-filled containers and objects, where possible. Change the water in bird baths at least once per week.

• Use an approved insect repellent, such as one containing DEET or Icaridin.

• Make sure your window and door screens are tight and without holes, cuts or other openings.

As part of its ongoing West Nile prevention program, Halton Region staff continually monitor areas of standing water, eliminate potential mosquito breeding sites and larvicide when mosquito larvae is found. A map showing the locations of standing water sites on public properties that have had larvicide applied this year is available at halton.ca/wnv.

To report standing water at public facilities or for more information about West Nile virus, please visit halton.ca/wnv or dial 311.

Return to the Front page

Victims of abuse and sexual harassment have been given housing options by federal and provincial governments

News 100 redBy Staff

September 9, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Halton Region is receiving $876,000 in new funding under the Survivors of Domestic Violence Portable Housing Benefit Pilot program. Ontario has selected Halton as one of 22 communities across the province to test the pilot.

The governments of Canada and Ontario are investing more than $20 million over two years to provide ongoing assistance to approximately 1,000 survivors of domestic violence per year under the pilot program.

housing-family-moving

For the physically abused and sexually harassed mother – finding a safe place to live is paramount – the federal and provincial governments have set up a pilot project for the Region of Halton

Currently, survivors of domestic violence are given priority access to rent-geared-to-income social housing. Under the new pilot, those survivors approved under the Special Priority Policy will have the option to receive a portable housing benefit, so that they can immediately find housing in their community instead of waiting for a social housing unit to become available.

Based on the outcomes of the pilot, Ontario will consider ways to enhance the program and extend the portable housing benefit to other communities.

The new investment complements the commitments made through Ontario’s recent Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy update, and supports the province’s goal of ending chronic homelessness in 10 years.

This initiative also supports the Ontario government’s goals of ending violence against women and providing better supports for survivors which includes the government’s It’s Never Okay: Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment.

Return to the Front page

We stil don't know if Fortinos is going to be selling us wine come the fall.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

September 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If it looks too good to be true – it probably isn’t true.

Dang!

wine-group

Pleasant enough assortment.

There I was getting ready try out the different supermarkets and see what their wine offerings were going to be – the Ministry of Finance did say we were going to be able to buy wine in Supermarkets on October 28th. They provided a list of the supermarkets who were going to be in the wine biz.

Fortinos logoLoblaws was on the list. Fortinos is a part of the Loblaws operation – just a different brand name. We wanted to know if Fortinos would be selling wine and we asked this question:

“Can we assume that if a supermarket chain is part of the list of locations that can begin selling wine in October that any location in the chain can sell wine products?”

The response: “That is not correct. I am just in a meeting but let me get you some expanded info.”

loblaws logo smallWell it turns out it isn’t quite that simple. When we asked for a little more in the way of detail here is what we got back.

“Today’s announcement identified the successful respondents to the Request for Bids (RFB) held by the LCBO for the sale of wine in grocery stores, later this fall. The successful grocers will now move on to the next stage of the process, which is to apply to have their individual getting new - yellowstore locations inspected and authorized by the Alcohol Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO), and then enter in to the necessary wholesale supply agreements with the LCBO. We will provide further updates about the authorizations and individual store locations once the RFB process is complete in late October.”

I think we are going to be making trips to the LCBO for a while yet.

Return to the Front page

Unneeded or expired medications can now be left at any Halton pharmacy - police ending their facility drop off locations.

News 100 redBy Staff

August 22, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

The successful prescription drug drop off awareness campaign run by the Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) – Drug and Morality Unit (DMU), along with local partner pharmacies is transitioning from police facility drop off locations to locally based community pharmacy locations.

Expired or unused medications (prescription or over the counter) can be returned to any pharmacy in Halton. By responsibly dropping off your unused / expired medications to local pharmacies, you’ll not only ensure they’re disposed of properly – you’ll also keep them out of the wrong hands, preventing abuse, accidental ingestion and protecting our environment in the process.

The current police facility drug drop off collection bins will be removed August 31st 2016. The HRPS-DMU thanks their local community pharmacies for their support and looks forward to future proactive and preventative initiatives.

Return to the Front page

Hospital will have significantly improved internal communications system by the end of the year.

jbhhealthBy Staff

August 12th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Despite some problems the province had with creating a system for the electronic movement of medical records the people building the new seven floor patient tower appear to have a grip on the problem.

JBH renering July -15 with passageway to garage

The new communications system will be operational by the end of the year and will be part of the new seven storey patient tower that is now under construction.

EllisDon Design Build Inc., the company selected to build the new seven-story patient tower, that is very close to being closed in has chosen Orion Health’s Rhapsody Integration Engine which was designed for rapid interoperability between healthcare IT systems. It has been described as the pre-eminent engine delivering secure patient information among healthcare clinicians, collaborators and patients.

Joseph Brant Hospital’s communication infrastructure is being readied to meet the future healthcare needs of one of Canada’s fastest-growing communities. The system will power all communications and data processing

In a media release Gary Folker, EVP for Orion Health in North America said: “There’s urgency in healthcare for building technology solutions that accelerate the shift towards patient-centric care and away from the traditional disease-centred model of care.

“Partnering with EllisDon to help transform Joseph Brant Hospital into the pinnacle of healthcare delivery, will usher in a new wave of smart hospitals, while allowing us to combine our expertise in healthcare integration with their innovative approach to healthcare planning and design.”

“Rhapsody will be a key component of improving the workflow and communication among the various departments within the hospital, as well as the quality of real-time patient information available to clinicians. This greater access to secure patient data will ultimately result in more timely care and better coordination of care.

“As this is one of the most substantial projects we’ve worked on, our goal was to bring a technology partner on board that can help solidify the collaborative, patient-centric environment we are building,” said Stephen Foster Director, ICAT, EllisDon. “In Orion Health, we have the partner that offers the best healthcare information technology solutions to address the needs of both patients and healthcare professionals – now and into the future.”

In addition to the transformation of the hospital’s administrative, clinical and patient information systems, EllisDon is also spearheading the design, build and financing of a number of renovations and expansions within the hospital:

Construction of a new, seven-story patient tower that will have a new emergency department, nine operating rooms and a post-anesthetic care room that will allow for an additional 1,770 inpatient and day surgeries

Upon completion of the project there will be 172 modern inpatient beds and 70 per cent of the patient rooms will be private
Expansion of the cancer clinic, enabling the hospital to serve an additional 2,876 patient visits
Modernization and expansion of the laboratory to improve turnaround time for test results

The implementation of Rhapsody will be completed by September 2016, while construction of Joseph Brant Hospital’s new patient tower will be completed in the fall of 2017 and renovations to the existing hospital will be completed in 2018.getting new - yellow

Return to the Front page

Live and Play guide on line now

News 100 redBy Staff

August 12, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The 2016-17 Live & Play guide – the City of Burlington’s guide for information on recreation, sport, culture programs and festivals and events is now available online.

Printed copies are available for pick up at recreation centres, City Hall, 426 Brant St., Burlington Tourism and the Burlington Public Libraries.

Live and play coverThe Live & Play online guide allows you to view and share program information as well as register for programs directly from any computer or mobile device. View the online guide… RIGHT HERE

getting new - yellow

Return to the Front page

Water levels at their lowest since August 20, 2007; Region issues a level 2 water condition.

News 100 blueBy Staff

August 11th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

A combination of below-average precipitation this year with hot summer temperatures has resulted in water levels in local streams dropping well below normal.

As a result, Conservation Halton is escalating from a Level I to a Level II Low Water Condition for its watershed, based on criteria set out in the Ontario Low Water Response guidelines.

Conservation Halton’s data for the month of July indicates that like much of south central Ontario, the Halton watershed has received below-average precipitation and an unusually high number of very warm days. The watershed received an average of 43 mm of rain, which is only 54 per cent of the normal July average of 79 mm.

Bronte creek

Bronte Creek isn’t looking quite this flush these days.

The three-month total for May to July was approximately 105 mm or 45 per cent of normal for this time of year, and there have been 24 days where temperatures surpassed 30°C during this period of time (compared to an average of six days for the preceding three years). Furthermore, current stream flow data indicates that many of our watercourses are in a Level II Low Water Condition, with monthly July flows averaging 35 per cent of the lowest average summer monthly flow.

A Level II Low Water Condition is the second level of an escalating scale of low water conditions. Under the Level II Low Water Condition, water users in the Conservation Halton watershed are strongly encouraged to voluntarily conserve water with the aim of reducing overall consumption by a further 10 per cent, to a new target total reduction of 20 per cent. Conservation Halton had previously issued a Level I Low Water Condition on July 8, 2016.

Conservation Halton sign - angle

The Halton watershed is comprised of the Bronte, Grindstone, and Sixteen Mile Creek watersheds, which encompass portions of Puslinch, Hamilton, Halton Hills, Milton, Mississauga, Burlington and Oakville, as well as a number of smaller watersheds located in Burlington and Oakville.

The last time Conservation Halton declared a Level II Low Water Condition for its watershed was August 20, 2007. This Level II Low Water Condition was maintained until January 24, 2008 when it was reduced to Level I, then returned to normal conditions on February 6, 2008.

“The continued hot and dry weather conditions has resulted in the streams in the Halton watershed being lower than their typical levels for this time of the year and that is why we have moved to a Level II Low Water Condition,” said Conservation Halton Manager of Watershed Engineering Services, Janelle Weppler. “Given the situation, our team will maintain our increased level of monitoring and regular discussions with our Low Water Response Team. We encourage everyone to use water wisely.”

Major water users, such as golf courses, aggregate extractors, farm irrigators and others are asked to implement or continue their water conservation programs to reach the 20 per cent reduction target. Rural water users can lower the demand on the watercourses and aquifers by pumping water at a lower rate, storing it in ponds or by staggering their pumping times in conjunction with neighbours to lower peak demand. A 20 per cent voluntary reduction will help to provide water supplies for essential use and to sustain aquatic ecosystems.

Water users which rely on municipal sources are reminded to follow any water conservation measures as prescribed by Halton Region or their local municipality.

The Halton watershed is comprised of the Bronte, Grindstone, and Sixteen Mile Creek watersheds, which encompass portions of Puslinch, Hamilton, Halton Hills, Milton, Mississauga, Burlington and Oakville, as well as a number of smaller watersheds located in Burlington and Oakville.

• Normal – Normal Conditions are within normal limits.
• Level I – First indication of potential water supply problems, primarily a warning level – key focus is on voluntary conservation of water
• Level II – Indicates a potentially serious problem – conservation of water is extended to restrictions on non-essential uses
• Level III – Indicates a failure of the water supply to meet demand – key focus is on conservation, regulation and enforcement of non-essential uses.getting new - yellow

Return to the Front page

Police having a conversation with a 38 year old Mother of three about why they were left unattended in a car in blistering heat.

News 100 redBy Staff

August 11, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It happens.

There are some incredibly stupid parents out there.

Changing them is difficult; fortunately there are services that can work with negligent parents.

The public is one of the defences the children of negligent parents can rely on.

A 38 year old Halton Region mother of three is under investigation following an incident in a store parking lot early Wednesday evening.

HRPS crestOfficers were called to the parking lot around 6:45 p.m. in response to a citizen’s complaint that three children were in a car in an “expectant Mother” parking space. The car was parked in full sunlight and had its engine turned off. Four windows were open only approximately 3 inches each. The car was locked and the alarm had been activated.

Officers attended and persuaded the oldest child to open the door so that officers could check on them and get some fresh air flowing through the car. The children, aged between 4 and 12 years old, appeared hot, and the youngest appeared to be sleeping yet perspiring profusely. As a precaution, the officers summoned an ambulance to the scene. The children were checked by paramedics and appeared to be suffering no ill effects from the heat.

About 11 minutes after the initial call, the mother returned to the vehicle. She had a conversation with the officers and provided her excuse as to why she left her three children in a locked car, with no air conditioning, in 32 degree Celsius ambient heat.

Police will be reviewing video surveillance footage of the parking area to determine how many minutes, in excess of the known 11 minutes, that the children were subjected to these conditions. Officers will then determine what charges could and may be laid.

Halton Regional Police would like to remind people that leaving children or pets inside a motor vehicle is not only gravely dangerous, but unlawful as well. The interior temperature of a standard automobile in 32C weather can increase to 42C in 10 minutes, 48C in 20 minutes and 51C in 30 minutes. Having windows cracked open just a few inches has minimal to no affect on the increase in interior temperatures. Children have been known to succumb to heat stroke inside cars where the outside temperature is only 21C.getting new - yellow

Return to the Front page