Food Bank learns that a former associate is now in the ICU unit struggling to stay alive.

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

May 25th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Day in day out with time off for the weekends and holidays the staff and volunteers at the Burlington Food Bank are there for those who need help.

There was some good news from Feed Ontario – the province’s largest collective of hunger-relief organizations of which the Burlington Food Bank is a very active member.

As positive as that news is, and we will tell you a bit more about it – we first need to share some very painful news.

A former associate of the Food Bank is currently in the ICU, fully sedated and on a machine working their lungs, fighting covid19.

They are very sad and hoping for any sign of improvement. They ask you to join them in their prayers

It is difficult to stay focused and continue helping others when you learn that one of your own is suffering.

Stolte at Food Bank

Food arrives throughout the day – five days of every week. Volunteers unpack, quarantine the food and then pack it up for delivery.

Together with food banks, industry partners, and local communities, the Burlington Food Bank works together to end hunger and poverty by delivering fresh and healthy food, developing innovative programming, and driving change through research and advocacy.

Feed Ontario provides the Burlington Food Bank with an allotment of MILK twice each month from the Dairy Farmers of Ontario. Since we are partners with the Salvation Army, we are able to share some of this with them.

Robin Food Bank with milk

Dairy Farmers of Ontario allotment milk to the Food Bank twice every month. Robin Bailey the Food Bank Executive Director is handing it out.

Robin Bailey, Executive Director of the Food Bank said he “hoped everyone had a great long weekend and that everyone still understands the need to be diligent with safety protocols everywhere. “We all need a little good news right now so if we do our best to keep others safe maybe the numbers will start looking better.”

If you are in need or know of someone who could use our help, PLEASE have them email us at info@burlingtonfoodbank.ca or call 905-637-2273 to make arrangements to have food dropped at their door or make arrangements to pick it up through our curb-side pickup option. If you are a resident in Burlington, we are all here to help. Don’t struggle – give us a call.

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Thordon Bearings appoints Galoni as CEO: first female to take the helm of the 110 year old corporation

News 100 blueBy Staff

May 25th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Anna Galoni has been appointed Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of bearing and seal specialist Thordon Bearings Inc., a Thomson-Gordon Group company.

Galoni Thordon CEO

Anna Galoni on the Thordon shop floor

Galoni, the first female CEO in the Burlington-headquartered company’s 100+ year history, says that while it is encouraging that more women are being selected for senior executive roles, the boardrooms of the country’s maritime and industrial manufacturing businesses remain “male-dominated industries”.

“While there are now more women in senior roles in Canada’s top 100 companies than before, there are still a lot of industries that could be more egalitarian. The maritime and industrial manufacturing industries are certainly still male-dominated,” she said. “A woman brings a different viewpoint to the boardroom.”

Galoni, who joined the seals and bearings manufacturer in 2007, after graduating from Queens University with a Masters’ Degree in epidemiology, recalls her dismay when she learned there were no female applicants for a senior role the company was recruiting for.

“Maybe they might be more open to applying for jobs in the manufacturing and engineering sectors when there is a female at the helm, I don’t know. What I do know is that these industries need to be made more attractive to women. There needs to be more diversity in the boardroom; they need to be open to different concepts, different perspectives, different ideas.”

Breathing new life into the family-owned Thomson-Gordon Group, Galoni has now finalized a company-wide restructure and is set to implement a strategic plan that will see the Group expand and diversify its product portfolio into other markets.

“Our philosophy, then and now, is to innovate and make systems and technologies that last a lifetime and add value for our customers. This will continue to be at the heart of everything we do.”

“There’s a lot of things happening,” she said. “People here are excited. I am excited. Innovation is a huge part of our 110-year-history and this will continue. We want to grow the business and have big plans to take us to the next level.”

Prior to Anna’s appointment in April, she held a number of senior roles in various departments including Human Resources Director, and New Product Development Director. In addition to her CEO role, Anna is also the Chair of Thomson-Gordon Group companies Thordon Bearings and Marsh Brothers Aviation.

Her appointment follows the retirement of Terry McGowan, who stepped down after almost 14 years in the CEO role.

Thordon Bearings’ technologies are used across the marine, clean power generation, pump and industrial sectors. The company’s bearing and seal products have achieved worldwide renown as grease- and maintenance-free, environmentally safe alternatives to traditional bronze bearings.

Related news story:

Sandy Thomson takes Thordon into its second century

Major federal contract goes to Burlington company

 

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What do we have in Burlington that relates to Queen Victoria whose birthday we celebrate this weekend?

News 100 blueBy Alan Harrington

May 24th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

There are probably hundreds, if not thousands of people who don’t fully understand what the holiday we are celebrating this weekend is all about.  Alan Harrington tells you why it matters

Victoria Day is the time when we remember the birthday of a Queen who ruled the most powerful country in the world about 200 years ago. Is there anything in town that relates to her?

There is actually: an old green fountain at the City Hall on the corner of Brant and Ontario Streets honours her son, who went on to succeed her as King Edward VII.

Edward VII became King when his mother Queen Victoria died in 1901, and King Edward VII ruled from 1901 to 1910.

fountain

The fountain was manufactured in Hamilton and originally had a horse trough. And the glass ball on top was larger than the one today.

The fountain, likely the oldest piece of public art in the city is highlighted in the Burlington Historical Society digital collection and is an important stop on the annual Downtown Heritage Walks conducted during Burlington Heritage Month in February.

The King Edward VII fountain was dedicated 108 years ago, on 2 May 1912 by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, Sir John Gibson.

image001

In the left background is the south elevation of the Trader’s Bank, Brant Street. The carriage on the left conveyed his honour Lieut.-Governor Sir John Gibson, who unveiled the fountain, and Reeve M. C. Smith. The Sons of England float, on the right, carried, clockwise from the centre front: John Bull (represented by Sam Oakes); British soldier (Alf Matthews); Canadian soldier (Charles Rump); Britannia (Jennie Dearing); Miss Canada (Ida Ladle); and Sons of England representative (W. Metcalfe).

The parade and dedication ceremony drew people from far and wide.

Those parades were major events in those days.

The fountain was originally located at the foot of Brant Street and Water Street (now Lakeshore) next to what today is the Lakeshore Coffee House.

The Hamilton Spectator reported 4,000 people witnessing the unveiling on the 2nd anniversary of Edward VII’s death.

Line up statue

The fountain was tucked in between what was then a Royal Bank and the Roxy movie Theatre where there were often long line ups to watch a movie.

The fountain was later moved to Spencer Smith park.

The fountain, manufactured in Hamilton, originally had a water trough for horses. The glass ball on top was larger than the one today.

fountain - best

The fountain after its first restoration with the water troughs in place.

The fountain spent a considerable amount of time in storage until it was restored by the Optimist Club of Burlington and relocated to City Hall for the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977

Time once again eroded the features of the fountain. After some encouragement from local concerned citizens, the city agreed the fountain needed work.

relocation plaqueAnd so, it has been carefully removed and taken to the repair shop.

The four Lion Heads at each corner (for the corners of the earth) match the four lion heads under the City Hall clock. Great Britain was once the most powerful country on earth – it stretched to the four corners of the earth.

As for the man the fountain was created to honour: Edward (Prince Albert) known as Bertie, was in the Golden Horseshoe in 1860 when he visited Toronto and Niagara Falls. He never did get to Burlington.

removal plaque

Taken away to be restored.

The fountain may be small but it stands its ground. It is the oldest public object still on display in the City of Burlington and has been there as our small town has grown to a great city.

But time and weather are hard on such treasures.

 

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More than one candidate expected to seek the Provincial Liberal nomination

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

May 23rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

So – it isn’t going to be a slam dunk.

Kearns Lisa side view Mar 2019

First term ward 2 Councillor Kearns has announced that she will seek the Liberal nomination for the next provincial election.

Reliable  sources said today that Lisa Kearns would be seeking the nomination for the Burlington Provincial Liberal party when the nomination event is held and that a date has not yet been set.

The source added that “there is another candidate for this position”.

The source was not authorized to speak on behalf of the Provincial Liberal Association.

Kearns has been quite active in talking about her personal political plans – she has a virtual ward meeting later in the month – perhaps we will learn even more that that event.

McKenna + Drummond

Andrew Drummond, NDP candidate in the last provincial election, in conversation with Jane McKenna who won that election.

Andrew Drummond will be the candidate for the New Democrats.  Jane McKenna is the Progressive Conservative sitting member.

Premier Doug Ford has been hammered heavily for the way his government has handled the pandemic and managed the response.  Many prefer to use the word “mismanaged” when referring to the provincial vaccination program.

Early reports from Kearns-based sources had her being asked to run for the provincial seat rather than Mayor Meed Ward who was thought to have leadership aspirations at the provincial level.

In the event that Kearns is nominated and wins the election that would block a political growth path for Meed Ward.

Kearns is also reported to have chosen a colleague to groom for the ward 2 council seat.

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Hug coupons: Come in three sizes - mini, itsy-bitsy and teensy-weensy

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

May 23rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Years and years ago, in another life, I was a book publisher. I wasn’t particularly successful but I did publish a couple of significant books.

A book on the early political history of New Brunswick – Front Benches and Back Rooms.   Another – The Power to Make it Happen –a book on how communities can take hold of the power they have and bring about change.

stren couponOne of the favouites was “Bo, the Constrictor who Couldn’t” by Patti Stren, an author who lives in New York now – we still keep in touch.  The book is no longer in print.

Patti has gone electronic – she sent me her most recent graphic effort. Click on the link – and share what she is giving to every one you know.

You have some choices; there is the mini, then the itsy-bitsy and the teensy-weensy.

Given the status of the pandemic you might want to print pages of coupons and hand them out to everyone you see.

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People were out on the sports fields, tennis courts, golf links and the skate board park

sportsgold 100x100By Denis Gibbons

May 23rd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A sprinkle of rain failed to prevent Burlingtonians from accessing outdoor sports facilities on Saturday, the first day the provincial government opened them up following the most recent lockdown.

baseball

Batter can see the ball – did he hit it?

bike number 2 22

Watching the angle carefully.

The surprising thing is that the artificial turf football field and soccer field at Norton Park on Dundas Street was padlocked, forcing teen soccer players to hop over the fence to practice.

soccer 22

A light warn up – before a game?

The splash pad at LaSalle Park also was not operating for some reason.

The starter at Millcroft Golf Club reported he had 300 tee times available and 248 of them were booked.

Recreational tennis and lessons took place at the Burlington Tennis Club on Drury Lane and there is still space available in summer camps.

tennis 22

The tennis courts were kept busy -opening up the sports facilities was a smart move.

President John Kemp said the club took advantage of the lockdown to install new lights on three of its courts and erect a new practice wall with a new ground surface.

The club’s first pickleball court should be ready by July 1 and all tennis courts are due to be resurfaced either in the fall or spring.

golf 22

Golf courses were busy as well

At the elite Burlington Golf and Country Club, the Gazette’s roving photographer was asked to avoid taking a shot of a golfer teeing off because of a dress code violation.

It was not that the golfer was wearing shorts, rather his golf shirt was not tucked in.

What makes warm weather work for those who aren’t playing a sport?  The ice cream truck.

ice cream 22

When the music plays every child knows what’s coming.

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You now pay for parking in the Beachway on weekends. Tow trucks will be on hand to tow those who do not pay.

News 100 blueBy Staff

May 22nd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There isn’t an elected official at city hall who hasn’t had to deal with parking issues. That situation isn’t about to change this weekend when the city makes it mandatory to pay for parking in the Beachway.

Parking - took his chances

Earlier in the year, before paid parking was required, people would park right in front of the No parking sign.

The city needed a way to get some control over parking in the Beachway. People were leaving their vehicles wherever they could find a space: chaos reigned.

Pay for parking sign croppedEffective now you have to pay to park in the Beachway – and finding a space is not guaranteed. When you do find a space you follow the signs.

There are two ways to pay.

Use the Honk app or use you cell phone camera and take a picture of the QR code and you will be on your way.

The city will have Park Ambassadors roaming around the parking lot – they are there to help.  Be polite to them.

There will be free parking passes for Halton Region residents on the weekends.

Exemptions are not required on holidays as parking is free on holidays. Visitors must have a valid parking exemption or pay for parking on Saturdays and Sundays only from May 22 to Sept. 25

When Halton Region residents arrive at Beachway parking lot, they can find a City of Burlington ambassador to receive a paper permit and display it on their dashboard. The online form will be available in July. The exemption form link will be added to www.burlington.ca/paypark when it is available.

It is going to be messy – Burlingtonians have not had to share their beach all that much. The pandemic brought thousands to the waterfront – the space has to be shared.

Parking is free after 6 p.m. and on weekends and holidays in all downtown municipal parking lots, including the Locust Street Garage.

You can park free on the street.

There is parking space at the hospital parking structure. Parking in the city is free on the weekends and you can catch a bus at the John Street terminal and use Burlington Transit’s Routes 4, 10 and HSR’s Route 11 to get to the east end of Beachway Park.

Parking is free after 6 p.m. and on weekends and holidays in all downtown municipal parking lots, including the Locust Street Garage.

 

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Outdoor Recreational Amenities can Reopen

News 100 yellowBy Staff

May 22nd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Province has announced that outdoor recreational amenities can reopen as long as COVID measures are in place, beginning Saturday, May 22 at 12:01 a.m.

Now the city has to figure out which Parks and Recreation department programs can be made operational – again. This is perhaps the fourth pivot that department has had to make.

soccer balls + leg

You can kick the soccer ball around but can’t actually play a game – yet.

The things you will be able to do starting today include, but are not limited to, golf courses and driving ranges, soccer and other sports fields, tennis and basketball courts, and skate parks.

Outdoor limits for social gatherings and organized public events will be expanded to five people, which will allow these amenities to be used for up to five people, including with members of different households. All other public health and workplace safety measures under the province wide emergency brake remain in effect.

Changes to City services and programs:  Recreation Services, Parks, Amenities and Facilities
Outdoor Courts
Outdoor courts such as pickleball, basketball and tennis courts will be open Saturday, May 22. If there are people waiting to use the court, please keep your time to a maximum of 30-minutes. Masks are to be worn while waiting for your turn. For locations of outdoor courts, visit burlington.ca/outdoorplay.

Sport Fields
Grass sport fields will open for casual use such as throwing a ball, self-directed yoga, kicking a ball or flying a kite. Organized sports and recreational classes are not permitted. Groups of up to five people are allowed. Please make sure you stay 6 feet from anyone not in your household.

Skateboarding Norton elements

The skate boarders will be out in droves this weekend.

Skate Parks
Skate parks will be open on Saturday, May 22. Please make sure you stay 6 feet from anyone not in your household. Wearing a mask is highly recommended.

City Park Washrooms
Most City park washrooms will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

LaSalle Community Park Marina
In partnership with the LaSalle Community Park Marina Association, the public boat launch is not ready to open yet and will remain closed until further notice. It will reopen once boats have been cleared from the lower parking lot.

Tyandaga sign

Open – but try getting a T time

Tyandaga Golf Course
Tyandaga Golf Course will open for play on Saturday, May 22 at 7 a.m. Book online at tyandagagolf.com or call 905-336-0006 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. starting today.

For a list of the Pickle Ball court locations CLICK HERE

Roads, Parks and Forestry
Services provided by the Roads, Parks and Forestry Department will continue as needed. Residents with questions or concerns can email RPF@burlington.ca or call 905-333-6166.

As the province wide vaccination rate and key public health and health care indicators improve, and City staff receives and reviews updated orders from the Province of Ontario and more details under its Roadmap to Reopen, the Parks people will continue to comply and keep you informed on available City services and what can open while keeping City of Burlington staff and residents safe.

Meed Ward at BSCI

The Mayor wants to see everyone out and about – but following the guidelines.

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward adds: “This is welcome news and something my fellow Mayors from all across Ontario have been advocating for throughout this present lockdown. We know healthcare and science experts have repeatedly stated that the risk of transmission of COVID-19 in these activities is low, and the mental and physical benefits are high.

“With warmer weather upon us, I know Burlington residents will be thrilled with this announcement. I encourage our amazing community to enjoy these activities safely, as intended, with thoughtfulness and care so that we do not risk undoing the great progress we have made in the past month in both reducing new cases and steadily increasing vaccinations. Please avoid crowding over five people at a time, and be patient to wait your turn when other groups are using amenities. When using outdoor amenities, please also be courteous and thoughtful to those who are waiting so everyone can have a turn.”

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Rivers asks: Has Ford Been Playing Us ?

 

Rivers 100x100By Ray Rivers

May 22nd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

OPINION

Doug Ford is right about one thing. Ontario residents will only stop getting sick and dying after we’ve all had our shots. That is because he has been unable and/or unwilling to control the transmission of the virus.

It’s been over a month since he applied his famous emergency brake. And despite the so-called shut down we’re still hitting a couple thousand cases and a couple dozen deaths a day. Yet the reason why it’s taking so long is obvious.

Ford gregarious

Ontario had elected a populist – when the pandemic hit he was expected to lead – many were disappointed.

He shut down the wrong part of Ontario’s economy. Almost 70 percent of COVID transmission in hot spot Toronto, for example, has been taking place in the workplace among factory and warehouse workers and the construction trades.

Had Ford made these folks stay at home we might have seen real and rapid reductions in the numbers. Killing the provincial sick pay plan just made it worse. According to a Peel region study 25% of the industrial workforce had been showing up at work with COVID symptoms.

Ford promised to be brutal at his disastrous April media conference, and he was. But he brutalized the wrong folks. Shutting down outdoor recreational activities, including golf and tennis, which had never reported a case of COVID, was just mean… and stupid.

Doug Ford covid t shirt

Leading the province through a pandemic proved to be more than the Premier and his Cabinet could handle.

But if Ford really wanted to bring the numbers down he should have focused on the sectors where transmission is high. Instead, it was all a smokescreen. He declared residential construction an essential service. How could building a new subdivision in a time of COVID be considered essential?

Mr. Ford’s legislative record makes it clear that he has used the pandemic as a cover to fast track development in the province. His government passed a number of COVID recovery laws last year. And they were more about development than anything else. He has enacted his autocratic Minster’s Zoning Orders, ignoring and bypassing local councils and their voters’ wishes on development.

Ford has unearthed a plan to build a new 400 series highway (413) on property held by a group of developers, who collectively have contributed close to a million dollars to Ford’s party since 2014. They own 39 properties along the proposed route covering 3,300 acres, which is worth about half a billion dollars in today’s market. But their windfall profit is expected to inflate wildly from adjacent sprawl development once the highway is approved.

Ford Doug with graph Apr 16

Scientists were providing solid data – the Premier seemed to use what worked for his agenda.

He has stripped conservation authorities of their role in the approval of new developments that can affect them and all of us. In protest, former Toronto Mayor and Mulroney cabinet minister David Crombie, has resigned as chair of the Greenbelt. And in an insult to everyone who cares about the environment, Ford replaced him with former Harris environment minister Norm Sterling, of Walkerton crisis fame, who actually voted against establishing the Greenbelt.

The speed with which this government is undoing decades of environmental protection in the province is stunning. One has to ask whether Ford is packing in as much development as he can before the next election. And that, apparently, takes priority over controlling COVID.

Ford OPEN for business

It was always about business – the closer they could get to the Premier the better it was for the development community. And they certainly did manage to get very close.

But as the numbers surged this past March, and infected people overwhelmed Ontario’s hospitals, Ford needed to appear to be doing something – to be taking charge. So he scapegoated the federal government and played the rest of us.

His stay at home order was brutal and tough, especially on children and their parents. But it has had little effect on COVID transmission. The numbers are falling because we are getting vaccinated. The stay at home order was mainly just for show.

Rivers hand to faceRay Rivers writes weekly on both federal and provincial politics, applying his more than 25 years as a federal bureaucrat to his thinking.  Rivers was a candidate for provincial office in Burlington where he ran against Cam Jackson in 1995, the year Mike Harris and the Common Sense Revolution swept the province.

 

Background links:

Friends with Benefits –     Sick Pay –     Under Cover

Emergency Order –     Construction COVID –       Small Gatherings –

MZO –      Crombie Resigns

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Gypsy Moth Spraying to take place Tuesday - early early in the day

News 100 greenBy Staff

May 21st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

On Tuesday, May 25, the City of Burlington will be using a low-flying helicopter to apply a bio-pesticide over four wooded areas to control gypsy moth populations. The gypsy moths eat the leaves of trees, causing significant defoliation and potential long-term impact to the City’s urban forest.

gypsy moth

This moth will eat your tree bare

Application of the pesticide will be completed between 5 and 7:30 a.m. and is expected to take 5-10 minutes for each park.

The areas identified for spraying include:

  • City View Park
  • Kilbride Park
  • LaSalle Park
  • Zimmerman Park

City staff will be stopping traffic on roads nearest the park while the helicopter is spraying. The road closure will take 15 minutes or less.

aerial spraying gypsy moth

The aerial spraying is being done as safely as possible.

An interactive map is available on burlington.ca/gypsymoth that allows residents to enter an address so they can see where the address is in relation to the spray areas.

The second spray date will be posted on the City’s Twitter and Facebook accounts @CityBurlington and online at burlington.ca/gypsymoth at least 48-hours before the spraying.

Steve Robinson Forestry Manager

Steve Robinson Forestry Manager

Steve Robinson, Manager of Urban Forestry explains:  “The weather forecast shows good conditions for the aerial spraying and the gypsy moth larva are at the right stage in their development for the treatment to have maximum impact on them. A successful reduction in their number will help protect the health of our trees and the environment which is a win for everyone.”

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Halton's MPs meet with disabled community - promise more funding

News 100 redBy Staff

May 21st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Yesterday, the Honourable Karina Gould, Member of Parliament for Burlington, the Honourable Anita Anand, Member of Parliament for Oakville, Pam Damoff, Member of Parliament for Oakville North-Burlington, and Adam van Koeverden, Member of Parliament for Milton were joined by community advocates and local service providers to discuss support for people living with disabilities in Halton.

Paul WHO in wheel chair - Senior

The objective is to ensure that people with mobility limitations are able to take part in all community activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the long-standing barriers Canadians with disabilities have faced for decades. Since the start of the pandemic, many have faced higher costs in accessing food, medication, social services or health care.

As Members of Parliament in Halton, we remain committed to advancing policies that build inclusivity from the beginning and will continue to work to reflect the principle of ‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’ when it comes to creating a society that is inclusive by design and promotes belonging for everyone.

Important stakeholders including Community Living Burlington and Community Living Oakville, Charter Ability, the Burlington Accessibility Advisory Committee, Stroke Recovery, Meals on Wheels, Special Olympics, and Goodwill Amity came together to share their thoughts on how we can continue to push for more inclusive spaces in our communities.

One of the overwhelming pieces of feedback was that we as a society need to engage in an attitudinal change. Inclusiveness for those living with a disability should be built into planning and policy procedures from the very beginning to ensure that all of us are included.

Our community spaces need to be inclusive and accessible. While we have made progress in this space, there is more work to be done to ensure that everyone can access and utilize spaces that many of us take for granted, such as public washroom facilities.

We also need to work harder to ensure that housing is not only affordable but accessible and that job opportunities are available and accommodating to all interested applicants.

We will also continue to work to foster inclusion and belonging in the workforce for people living with disabilities, recognizing the unique skills and talents they bring to employment.

In Budget 2021, the Government of Canada has made significant proposals to support people living with disabilities and ensure our communities are more accessible, including:

• Undertaking consultations to reform the eligibility process for federal disability programs and benefits. This work would feed directly into the design of a new disability benefit;

• Triple funding for the Enabling Accessibility Fund and support small and mid-sized projects with not-for-profit organizations, women’s shelters, child care centres, small municipalities, Indigenous organizations, territorial governments, small businesses, and businesses of all sizes;

• Improving access to the Disability Tax Credit;

• Extending disability supports under the Canada Student Loans Program;

• Providing $29.2 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to ESDC through the Enabling Accessibility Fund to support child care centres as they improve their physical accessibility;

• Support the creation of a National Autism Strategy and;

• Renewing Funding for the Office of Public Service Accessibility.

 

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Women's Health Issue to be Subject of a Podcast by two Certified Menopause Practitioners

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

May 20th 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Every woman experiences menopause differently but the onset of menopause can mean a variety of symptoms (hot flashes, insomnia, mood swings etc.) and a marked increase in certain health risks. While there are women that immediately seek treatment, menopause symptoms are just as often left untreated due to misconceptions about the treatment options available. As a result, 70% suffer in silence or miss the window for seeking treatment options that can actually make life more comfortable.

There are healthcare providers available known as Menopause Practitioners, that are dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of women through an understanding of menopause. These specialists see patients to help them assess and determine treatment protocols, and they may be more accessible in your community than you think!

Menopause women

Kerry Roberts & Carolyn Whiskin, Certified Menopause Practitioners at Brant Arts IDA have helped hundreds of women through their transitional years and now they are heading online to empower more women in their quest towards a healthier postmenopausal life.

Brant Arts IDA Pharmacy is home to two experts in women’s health: both are Certified Menopause Practitioners.
Kerry Roberts and Carolyn Whiskin. Together, Roberts & Whiskin have been referred by many doctors and met with hundreds of patients to help them through their transitional years. Their expertise includes a vast knowledge of women’s health concerns such as: sleep disturbances, hot flashes, low libido, mood swings, irregular menstruation and more.

These two energetic experts are offering a free online education session entitled: “Menopause Symptoms… Do I REALLY Have To Live With Them?” This session provides a casual and relaxed online environment for postmenopausal women to learn what should be expected with regards to menopause symptoms. “We’ll discuss the benefits and risks of many treatment options so women can feel in control about choosing the best treatment for them!” Roberts explains.

They will then evaluate the impact of the education they provide and this research will be used to help improve the future of women’s health. Roberts & Whiskin are looking for females that have experienced menopause symptoms but have yet to seek treatment to participate in their free upcoming education sessions. While their first few sessions filled up quickly, the next available date is June 8. Space is limited. Details can be found at: www.brantarts.ca/menopause

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Joseph Brant President Updates the Community - things are better - still some very sick people to take care of

News 100 blueBy Eric Vandewall

May 20th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

Over the past few weeks, I have been sharing these regular updates with our community to keep you informed of what is happening at Joseph Brant Hospital and to seek your help to move out of this third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This week, I would like to say thank you. Thank you for following public health measures. Thank you for getting vaccinated. Thank you for continuing to show your support for our hardworking staff and physicians in your emails, phone calls, Join the J lawn signs, available at www.jointhej.ca, and social media posts. With your help, we are moving in a more positive direction.

We are starting to see the pressure on critical care bed capacity easing. Today the number of COVID-19 patients receiving critical care is 718: 494 of these patients are on a ventilator. Today, JBH is at 82% capacity. We are currently caring for 13 patients with confirmed COVID-19 as well as presumed and resolved cases – 11 of the confirmed COVID-19 patients are in Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

Yesterday it was announced that hospitals across the province can gradually resume surgeries and procedures as able, based on capacity and resources. Our teams are planning the resumption of scheduled care, ensuring the safety of our patients, staff, and physicians. If you were impacted by a deferral, your surgeon or physician will contact you with more information as soon as available.

While we are seeing a decrease in acute care cases, as well as daily new COVID-19 case numbers, it is important to put this information into perspective. The daily case numbers we are seeing now are equal to the number reported during the peak of the second wave. Ontario’s hospital occupancy rate is still very high and it will take time for this rate to decrease to acceptable levels.

The reality is we are still very much in this third wave. By following public health measures, the risk of transmission decreases, and so does the number of severely ill COVID-19 patients in our hospitals.

Vaccination is also a key ally in our fight to stop the spread of the virus. As of today, more than 260,000 Halton residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine offered through regional clinics, pharmacies and family physicians. I am proud to report that since March 12, the Halton Region COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic at Joseph Brant Hospital has administered over 22,000 doses. We have also started to increase the number of available appointments per day. In less than a week, we expect to reach 25,000 doses.

There is more good news – anyone age 18 and up is can now make an appointment to get vaccinated. This is a very positive development that will also help us out of this third wave safely and stronger than before. I encourage everyone who is eligible to make an appointment: either online at www.halton.ca/covidvaccine or call 311 if you need assistance.

Some of you may have questions or concerns about getting vaccinated. Please talk to your doctor or go to credible sources like Halton Region, the Ontario government and Health Canada for more information. During the recent Immunization Awareness Week, our own Dr. Dale Kalina answered a series of questions from our community related to vaccine. I invite you to watch these short video clips on our Instagram page.

Please continue to look after each other. Stay safe and thank you once again for your unwavering support of our hospital.

Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital CEO is about to tell us what he gets paid annually. He didn't volunteer this information.

Eric Vandewall: President and CEO Joseph Brant Hospital

Eric Vandewall is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Joseph Brant Hospital.  He was appointed in 2009 and took on the task of adding additional space and a completely new wing to the hospital.

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The Road to Normality - Premier Lays it Out

News 100 blueBy Staff

May 20th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Ontario government has released its Roadmap to Reopen, a three-step plan to safely and cautiously reopen the province and gradually lift public health measures based on the province wide vaccination rate and improvements in key public health and health care indicators. In response to recent improvements to these indicators, Ontario will allow more outdoor recreational amenities to reopen, with restrictions in place, effective May 22, 2021 at 12:01 a.m.

Doug Ford finger pointing

Doug Ford: He is a happier man today. Thinks the Leafs are going to win tonight.

“As a result of the strict public health measures we introduced to stop the spread of COVID-19 variants, we are seeing a steady improvement in our situation as ICU and hospital numbers begin to stabilize,” said Premier Doug Ford. “While we must remain conscious of the continued threat the virus poses, with millions of Ontarians having received at least their first dose of vaccine we can now begin the process of a slow and cautious re-opening of the province in full consultation with our public health professionals.”

Roadmap to Reopen outlines three steps to easing public health measures, guided by the following principles:

• Step One – An initial focus on resuming outdoor activities with smaller crowds where the risk of transmission is lower, and permitting retail with restrictions. This includes allowing outdoor gatherings of up to 10 people, outdoor dining with up to four people per table and non-essential retail at 15 per cent capacity.

• Step Two-  Further expanding outdoor activities and resuming limited indoor services with small numbers of people where face coverings are worn. This includes outdoor gatherings of up to 25 people, outdoor sports and leagues, personal care services where face coverings can be worn and with capacity limits, as well as indoor religious services, rites or ceremony gatherings at 15 per cent capacity.

• Step Three – Expanding access to indoor settings, with restrictions, including where there are larger numbers of people and where face coverings can’t always be worn. This includes indoor sports and recreational fitness; indoor dining, museums, art galleries and libraries, and casinos and bingo halls, with capacity limits.

The province will remain in each step for at least 21 days to evaluate any impacts on key public health and health system indicators. If, at the end of the 21 days, the following vaccination thresholds have been met, along with positive trends in other key public health and health system indicators, then the province will move to the next step:

• Step 1: 60 per cent of adults vaccinated with one dose.

• Step 2: 70 per cent of adults vaccinated with one dose and 20 per cent vaccinated with two doses.

• Step 3: 70 to 80 per cent of adults vaccinated with one dose and 25 per cent vaccinated with two doses.

Based on current trends in key health indicators, including the provincial vaccination rate, the government expects to enter Step One of the Roadmap the week of June 14, 2021. The province will confirm closer to the expected start of Step One.

“While we know that now is not yet the moment to reopen, Ontarians deserve to know the path forward on what we will carefully reopen and when, starting with the settings we know are safest,” said Christine Elliott, Deputy Premier and Minister of Health. “Brighter days are ahead and we believe this Roadmap represents a path out of the pandemic and will encourage Ontarians to get vaccinated and to continue following public health advice.”

The province-wide emergency brake restrictions remain in effect while the province assesses when it will be moving to Step One of the roadmap with the Stay at Home order expiring on June 2, 2021. During this time, the government will continue to work with stakeholders on reopening plans to ensure full awareness of when and how they can begin to safely reopen.

Due to the continuing success of Ontario’s vaccine rollout and the collective efforts of Ontarians in following public health and workplace safety measures to date, effective May 22, 2021 at 12:01 a.m. the province will reopen outdoor recreational amenities with restrictions in place, such as the need to maintain physical distancing.

These amenities include, but are not limited to, golf courses and driving ranges, soccer and other sports fields, tennis and basketball courts, and skate parks. No outdoor sports or recreational classes are permitted. Outdoor limits for social gatherings and organized public events will be expanded to five people, which will allow these amenities to be used for up to five people, including with members of different households. All other public health and workplace safety measures under the province wide emergency brake will remain in effect.

At this time, publicly funded and private elementary and secondary schools in the province will continue to operate under teacher-led remote learning. Data will be assessed on an ongoing basis and medical experts, including the Chief Medical Officer of Health, and other health officials will be consulted to determine if it may be safe to resume in-person learning.

“Due to the stringent efforts of Ontarians following public health and workplace safety measures, we have reached the point where we can begin preparing to exit the province-wide emergency brake and lift the Stay-at-Home order,” said Dr. David Williams, Chief Medical Officer of Health. “We must remain vigilant however, as the fight against COVID-19 is not over and our case counts, ICU capacity and hospitalizations are still concerning. It remains critical that all Ontarians continue to follow all public health and workplace safety measures currently in place to help further reduce transmission and save lives.”

The government will continue to work with the Public Health Measures Table, Public Health Ontario, and other public health and scientific experts to determine public health guidance for Ontarians to follow, including protocols for masking and outdoor/indoor gatherings, after being fully vaccinated.

Quick Facts
• Based on the latest modelling data COVID-19 case, positivity and hospitalization rates are decreasing, and control of the pandemic is improving. Maintaining the current rate of vaccination and public health and workplace safety measures will help to ensure Ontario starts to safely and gradually reopen.

• Ontario has administered first doses of the COVID-19 vaccines to over 58.5 per cent of Ontarians aged 18 and over. Over two million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Ontario since the start of May, and the province remains on track to have administered first doses to 65 per cent of Ontarians aged 18 and over by the end of May.

• The government has extended the province wide Stay-at-Home Order until June 2, 2021, and has maintained all public health and workplace safety measures under the province wide emergency brake to help to stop the rapid transmission of COVID-19 variants in communities, protect hospital capacity and save lives.

• The Stay-at-Home order currently in effect requires everyone to remain at home except for specified purposes, such as going to the grocery store or pharmacy, accessing health care services (including getting vaccinated), for outdoor exercise, or for work that cannot be done remotely.

• If passed by the Legislature, powers under the Reopening Ontario (A Flexible Response to COVID-19) Act, 2020 (ROA) will be extended to December 1, 2020 to ensure public health measures currently in place can be extended and adjusted as necessary, to deal with the impacts of COVID-19 and support a gradual re-opening of the province. There are currently 29 orders in effect under the ROA. Orders can be extended for up to 30 days at a time under the ROA, and the government must report on all order extensions to the Select Committee on Emergency Management Oversight.

As of 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 18, 2021, individuals aged 18 and over in 2021 across Ontario are eligible to book a COVID-19 vaccine appointment through the provincial booking system and call centre, or directly through public health units that use their own booking system.

 

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Different groups in the Beachway during the week - Moms with the kids and trades people getting it ready for the weekend

graphic community 3By Pepper Parr

May 20th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There were two groups active in the Beachway yesterday; one of them will be busy today and Friday getting that part of the city ready for the thousands that are expected to want to spend time on the sandy shores of Lake Ontario.

BoardwaLK new

New outdoor planking has been put in place around the Convenience Shack; public washrooms may not be ready for this weekend.

Contractors and maintenance people are beavering away to get washrooms set up, signs in place, and barriers where they are needed to keep people from putting their vehicles in the wrong places.

Mom with 4 kids at Beach May 19

Mom, the boys and a girl with a pail – heading for the lake.

Then there are the Moms – those we saw were driving pickup trucks and trundling down to the Beachway with their children in tow and all the stuff you need to play in the sand and enjoy the sunshine.

Then there was the couple; two people who have known Burlington most of their lives, who have found a quiet spot where they could sit side by side and enjoy the blessings.

seniors looking over lake Beachway

Listening to the silence and counting the blessings.

They were all their earlier this week; few of them will be there in the weekend.

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Public school board appoints new Director of Education; a lot of Toronto based experience

News 100 yellowBy Staff

May 19th, 221

BURLINGTON, ON

Trustees of the Halton District School Board are pleased to announce the appointment of Curtis Ennis as the new Director of Education, Chief Executive Officer and Secretary to the Board, effective August 1, 2021.  

curtis Enns

Curtis Ennis, newly appointed Director of Education for the Halton District School Board

Ennis’ career portfolio during the past 22 years has included a variety of senior leadership positions with the Toronto District School Board, Canada’s largest school board, as well as the Ontario Ministry of Education. Ennis began his career as a primary teacher and advanced through various leadership roles as a Superintendent of Education with increasing responsibilities.

He is currently the Associate Director, Equity, Well-Being and School Improvement (Interim). 

Ennis has led numerous strategic planning initiatives in the TDSB, as well as gaining leadership experience with the Ministry of Education’s Toronto and Area Regional Office. Ennis holds a Bachelor of Business Management (Accounting/Finance) and a Bachelor of Education and Master of Education (Language, Culture & Teaching) from York University. 

Following the retirement announcement of the current Director of Education, Stuart Miller, trustees began a search process in early December 2020. With the help of Joan M. Green and Associates/Lough Barnes Consulting Group (LBCG), an extensive consultation took place. The search involved consultation with stakeholders in the education community including HDSB staff, local unions, trustees, students,  community partners and beyond to develop the Halton-specific Director position profile.  

“The Trustees of the Halton District School Board (HDSB) were impressed with, and grateful for, the strong show of interest and outstanding qualifications of the candidates who applied for the position of Director of Education,” says HDSB Chair Andréa Grebenc.

“We are excited to welcome Curtis Ennis as the HDSB’s incoming Director.  Curtis brings a wealth of knowledge gained through senior leadership roles in the Ontario education sector. He has diverse experiences that will be invaluable in building strong relationships with students, staff, families and community members, as the HDSB continues its journey to fulfilling the goals outlined in the 2020-2024 Multi-Year Strategic Plan, and providing outstanding opportunities for every student.” 

 

Ennis has a proven-track record of strategic planning and leadership with a focus on student achievement and well-being, equity and inclusion, communication and relationship building. 

“I am truly honoured and excited to be joining the Halton District School Board as Director of Education, says Ennis. “I am grateful to the Trustees for their confidence in me and I look forward to leading and learning with the students, staff, families and community partners of Burlington, Halton Hills, Milton and Oakville in the years ahead. Leadership for me has always been about service and I am deeply committed to working with all staff and the Board to carry on the Halton tradition of excellence in education while being acutely mindful of those who have been historically under-served and have faced barriers to positive outcomes.

“Working collaboratively with students, staff, trustees and communities, I will be intentional and focused on ensuring the success and well-being of students of all identities in HDSB.” 

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Road Safety Week: a 7-day national campaign aimed at making Canada's roads the safest in the world.

graphic community 5By Staff

May 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

Today marks the beginning of Canada Road Safety Week, a 7-day national campaign aimed at making Canada’s roads the safest in the world.

With what we have seen take place earlier this week in York, the importance of this message has never been more obvious. Our heart breaks for our neighbouring community.

car-accident-lawyer2

Auto accident consequences include criminal charges, fines, suspensions, or vehicle impoundment.

This annual awareness campaign is designed to increase public compliance with safe driving measures in order to save lives and reduce injuries. The focus of this campaign continues to be on behaviours that put drivers, passengers, pedestrians and other vulnerable road users at risk: impaired driving, distracted driving, aggressive driving, and not wearing a seat belt.

Unsafe driving behaviors come with increased risk of injury or death. Other consequences include criminal charges, fines, suspensions, or vehicle impoundment.

There is no excuse to justify unsafe driving behaviour. It is simply #NotWorthTheRisk.

We want Halton residents and all Canadians to remember the decisions they make and the consequences of their actions impact everyone on or near our roadways.

The Halton Regional Police Service thanks those in our community who recognize that they share the roads with others.

Car-Accident-Injuries-1000

Often takes months to recover accidents like this.

Whether you are a motorcyclist, a pedestrian, a driver, or a cyclist, remember… road safety starts with YOU.

The Halton Regional Police Service is proud to be participating in this year’s Canada Road Safety Campaign. While this public safety initiative is part of a national effort to help make Canada’s roads the safest in the world, we are confident that our local efforts will help make the roads here in Halton among the safest in Canada.

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Farmers' Market opens for the season - covid rules are being sensibly enforced

News 100 blueBy Staff

May 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It was the first day of operation this season for the Lions Farmers Market that set up in the south end of the Burlington Centre parking lot.

The weather was perfect; people strolled in, cleared the entrance where you are expected to squirt the disinfectant on your hands and begin looking at the produce.

Right to your tableAnd produce there was – the pictures tell that story.

The crowds weren’t great and there were a lot of empty places for the significant list of farm participants this market has had in the past.

It was week day – Saturday will tell the story.

There were plenty of Lions people on site welcoming as you came in and ready to answer any question.

Table laden with vegetable

You need a big bag when you leave this table – they had something of everything that comes out of the ground.

 

potato table + truck

 

Empty spaces

Lot of space for additional farmers – expect it to be busier on the weekend.

 

market - entry point

Squirt your hands at the entrance and enjoy what is being offered for sale.

Markets operate Wednesday, Friday and Saturday – well worth the time.

Hours of operation: Wednesdays   8:00 – 2:00   Fridays  8:00 – 3:00    Saturdays  8:00 – 2:00

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Is there a better park location in store for the residents of Station West in Aldershot?

News 100 greenBy Pepper Parr

May 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

When Ward 1 Councillor Kelvin Galbraith was doing his virtual community meeting earlier this week he made mention of a change that had been made to the Station West development the ADI Group has underway. Word is that the town houses are basically sold out.

ADI Masonry Court south boundary

Part of the Station West complex. The residents are going to want to organize a community group to ensure that their interests are fully protected. Not something the ward councillor will do for them

Next phase will be the condominiums that will be built at the northwest corner of the development where Waterdown Road intersections with Masonry Road.

Sometime in April the ADI people asked the community where they would like the park to be and put up a graphic showing what they had in mind.

Many were stunned by what was being offered.

option-1-3-towers

The small patch of land at the bottom of three high rise condos (in the 29 to 34 storey range) was the original park location.

According to Galbraith ADI has seen the error of their ways and decided to place a park to the north of the condo towers closer to the pond.

During a short tour of the property with camera in hand we photographed the pond and the piece of property the park would be located on. It could work – it is certainly better than what was offered back in April.

Site for the 3 conos

North of Masonry Road at the Waterdown intersection – three condo site.

park new area

What is understood to be the park space to the west of the town houses.

Pond - park with colour boundaries

Storm water pond to the left and what is believed to be the new space for the park.

Waiting for some response from the ADI people.

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Bentivegna points to growing tax rate problem: his colleagues ignore it

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

May 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Every once in a while ward 6 Councillor Angelo Bentivegna casts a vote intended to make a point.

Angelo B

Councillor Angelo Bentivegna: thinking it through.

This time he was asking what impact changing the business model for the Tyandaga Golf Club would have on the 2022 budget – and then reminded his colleagues that the projected tax rate for 2022 was 5.25%

Council was about to pass the item as part of a collection of issues that had been pulled together as a consent item, which is council’s way of voting on a number of decisions at the same time.

Any member of Council can ask to have an item pulled from the consent list so that it can be voted separately.

Bentivegna wanted more information on just what the change in the business model would have on the tax rate.

He was told that it would likely be between .07% or .08% – which would put the 5.25% projection over 6%

Staff did their best to assure Bentivegna that the public wouldn’t see any increase in 2022 and probably not in 2023 either.  Any funds the golf course needed would be for capital items and would go on a list to be considered by the Capital expense people.

Angelo - not getting it -deferal

Ward 6 Councillor Angelo Bentivegna making a point at a council meeting.

Bentivegna’s point was that – yes it would be going on a list and at some point the public would be asked to pay.

When it came to a vote on the item Bentivegna asked that it be a recorded vote.  He was going on the record and wanted his colleagues to do the same thing.

The vote was 6-1: Bentivegna had made his point with his “no”  vote.

The public will at some point be asked to pay for capital items at the golf course.  The fear in the minds of many is that the public might be asked to pay for some of the operating costs as well.

 

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