The Foxcroft men - gather around the Golden Whistle - reverently.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 8th, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

How does he do it?

The guy gets the Prime Minister of the country to say nice things about him – on tape – it was almost an endorsement – and he isn’t even a Liberal? All true – check the video

Queen Elizabeth II, in her capacity as Colonel-in-Chief of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, receives Colonel Ronald Foxcroft (Honorary Colonel) at Buckingham Palace in London.

Queen Elizabeth II, in her capacity as Colonel-in-Chief of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, receives Colonel Ronald Foxcroft (Honorary Colonel) at Buckingham Palace.

Ron Foxcroft almost had the Queen blowing one of his whistles when he was presented to her.

Foxcroft with THE whistle

Astronaut Clayton Anderson who took a Foxcroft whistle into space poses with the inventor of the thing.

He gets the highest award available for sports officiating – The Golden Whistle and then gets his picture taken with the astronaut who took one of the things into space.

Foxcroft with wife Marie

Ron Foxcroft with wife Marie and the Golden Whistle

He gets his picture taken with the woman who played basketball better than he ever did – made a smart move and married the woman.

Foxcroft men - cropped

The Foxcroft men – what a blood line.

Then he poses with his sons and grandsons – can you see another Ron in that bunch?

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BASEBALL - Burlington Bandits continue to be dominated by the Barrie Baycats

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 6, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The three teams at the bottom of the IBL regular season appear to be repeating their performance. All three were soundly defeated in the quarter finals games played so far.

IBL Aug 6

Inter County Baseball League quarter final standings as of August 6, 2106

Matthew St. Kitts was dominant as the Barrie Baycats beat the Burlington Bandits 7-3 Saturday night to take a 2-0 lead in their best-of-seven quarter-final.

St. Kitts (1-0) went seven innings and scattered four hits, allowing two runs while walking one and striking out eight.
Kyle Nichols homered, doubled and drove in five to lead the Baycats offence. Kevin Atkinson doubled and scored twice with an RBI, and Kyle DeGrace added a double and RBI.

Robert Tavone had both Bandits RBI. Grant Okawa added a double.

Jack Dennis (0-1) went 5.2 innings and gave up seven runs (six earned) on six hits, walking seven and striking out four.

In Hamilton the Kitchener Panthers took a 2-0 lead in their best-of-seven quarter-final against Hamilton with a 6-2 road win Saturday night.

Tanner Nivins and Mike Glinka each hit solo home runs as the second-place Panthers never trailed. Nivins added a single and had two RBI, while Glinka also walked and scored. Terrell Alliman added an RBI, David Whiteside singled twice, and Sean Reilly scored twice.

Noelvis Entenza (1-0) went seven innings for the win, giving up a run on four hits, striking out seven and walking one.

IBL batting champion Dre Celestijn singled and had a solo home run for the seventh-place Cardinals.

On the mound, Robert Wilson (0-1) took the loss after allowing four runs (three earned) on four hits in 6.2 innings. Wilson walked five and struck out two.

In Guelph the London Majors scored early and often in a 10-0 win over the Guelph Royals Saturday night.

London, which finished first in the regular season, broke open a scoreless game with five runs in the second inning and scored at least once in five different innings.

The Majors lead the best-of-seven quarter-final 2-0.

RJ Fuhr and Carlos Arteaga each had two hits and two RBI. Leadoff hitter Fuhr scored once, and Arteaga, batting eighth, scored twice. Keith Kandel added two hits, two runs and an RBI. Michael Ambrose, Cleveland Brownlee and Byron Reichstein all had a hit and RBI.

Oscar Perez (1-0) struck out nine over six shutout innings, scattering four hits and a walk.

For Guelph, Santino Silvestri and Chandler McLaren each had two hits.

Marc-Andre Major (0-1) lasted 1.1 innings and gave up two runs on one it, walking three and striking out two.

Baseball IBL league colours2016 IBL quarter-finals

Series A
(1) London Majors vs (8) Guelph Royals
London leads series 2-0
Game 1: London 9, Guelph 4
Game 2: London 10, Guelph 0
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at London; 1:05 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at London; 7:35 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at London; 7:35 p.m.

Series B
(2) Kitchener Panthers vs. (7) Hamilton
Cardinals Kitchener leads series 2-0
Game 1: Kitchener 12, Hamilton 6
Game 2: Kitchener 6, Hamilton 2
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Kitchener; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.

Series C
(3) Barrie Baycats vs. (6) Burlington Bandits
Barrie leads series 2-0
Game 1: Barrie 6, Burlington 1
Game 2: Barrie 7, Burlington 3
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Barrie; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.

Series D
(4) Brantford Red Sox vs. (5)
TorontoMaple Leafs Series tied 1-1
Game 1: Brantford 9, Toronto 8 (10 innings)
Game 2: Toronto 6, Hamilton 5
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Toronto; 2 p.m.
Game 4: Wednesday, Aug. 10 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 5: Friday, Aug. 12 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 6: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Toronto; TBD
*Game 7: Sunday, Aug. 14 at Brantford; 8 p.m.

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Burlington residents to be first to take part in provincial program to prepare for future floods.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 7th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The woman who badgered a Cabinet Minister to ensure that Burlington residents had access to ODRAP – Ontario Disaster Relief funds – announced Friday that Ontario is investing $237,000 in a pilot project that will help Burlington homeowners reduce the risk of basement flooding from severe weather events associated with climate change.

Eleanor McMahon was a backbencher MPP when the flood hit the city in 2014; today she is a member of the provincial Cabinet responsible for Tourism, Culture and Sport

McMagon at HaaP announcement

Burlington’s MPP, Cabinet Minister Eleanor McMahon announcing the Home Adaptation Assessment Program program.

In her announcement McMahon said: “Ontario’s people and businesses are already feeling the effects of climate change. It has damaged the environment and has caused extreme weather events such as flooding, which can damage basements and homes and increase insurance rates.

“After experiencing substantial residential flooding in August 2014, Burlington was selected as the ideal location to run the first large-scale basement-flood risk reduction program. Developed by the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, the Home Adaptation Assessment Program will:

Assess the vulnerability of 4,000 Burlington-area homes to flood damage
Make recommendations to help homeowners avoid costly damage from extreme weather
Collect the data needed to inform potential expansion of the program to communities across the province.

Flood Fairview plaza

This kind of flooding hit both the residential and the commercial community.

Lessons learned from the pilot program in Burlington will inform a broader roll-out of the program across Ontario.  The joint pilot is between the provincial government, Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, City of Burlington and participating homeowners who will be asked to pay a small fee for the inspection work done on their homes.

City Council has approved contributing an additional $50,000 the first year with opportunities to reassess in 2017.

The program, Home Adaptation Assessment Program (HAAP) will announce the names of the designated neighbourhoods and registration details this fall.

Basement flooded - stuff piled up

Basements throughout the city were cleared of wet soggy warped property and sent to the dump.

The media release added that: “Over the past decade, an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme rainfall events, aging municipal infrastructure and inadequate flood protection measures at the household level have all contributed to significant increases is basement flood damage costs across Canada. More specifically, property and casualty insurance claims have more than doubled in the past decade, with basement flooding being a central cause.”

That statement makes it sound as if the home owners were the ones to blame for problems with down spouts and letting the natural swales between houses build up.

A large part of the problem was with storm sewers that could not handle the huge and sudden flow of water. Home owners just did not know what they were supposed to do. The fire department puts out a regular flow of fire safety information – the same needed to be done about climate change.

The city knows now of a number of homes that cannot remain where they are in a specific flood plain; the information is in a city report but those specific home owners have not been informed.

The Home Adaptation Assessment Program (HAAP) is a basement-flood risk-reduction program. The program integrates international best practices for household flood prevention with input from homeowners and municipal engineers.

One-on-one support is available to individual households through a Home Adaptation Assessment. For a small fee, a trained HAAP assessor will take homeowners through a 50-point examination of potential water entry into the home and help develop a prioritized action plan to reduce risk. A customer help-line, follow-up surveys and seasonal maintenance reminders provide additional support to homeowners. HAAP’s approach is developed in consultation with local government, conservation authorities and community groups, ensuring that HAAP enhances and is complementary to existing flood-risk-mitigation programs.

Flood - Palmer Drive - with bin

Dumpster bins were in the driveways of hundreds of home in the city in August of 2014

The first large-scale phase of the development of HAAP will be carried out in Burlington where 4,000 home assessments in designated neighbourhoods will be completed by the end of 2017, with the first 500 to be completed in this year. These will be carefully selected to be representative of neighbourhoods across Ontario (based on home size and age, age and type of municipal infrastructure and past experience with flood risk). Lessons learned from HAAP delivery in Burlington will inform a broader roll-out of the program across Ontario.

The 2014 flood played no favourites. Both the Mayor and the federal member of parliament at the time had their basements flooded.

Related article: Insurance and pension fund sectors need better risk assessment tools to manage financial impact of climate change

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Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip is going to entertain us on the 20th - we can support the research that will eventually prevent this terrible disease.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 6th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Most of us experience reasonably good health – but we all know someone whose health is not good. We hope for the best for them.

When I was a boy, just after the war (the Second World War) polio was the scourge. Dr Jonas Salk had not come up with his polio vaccine yet. Wheel chairs, braces, iron lungs were part of the news stories before the vaccine was discovered.

My Mom was a cook at a YMCA camp; she took me and my brother and sister with her every summer.

In the summer of 1946 I became ill and a smart former army nurse said: This boy just might have contracted polio. She was a tough lady and insisted that I be driven to the local train station where they stopped a freight train with fresh fruit on it and got me into Montreal where I was transferred to the Montreal Children’s Hospital where a spinal tap was done.

I can still hear myself screaming away when the stuck that needle in me. But it worked – the doctors knew what they were doing because research was being done on polio and I benefited from that research.

I was days away from becoming a cripple that would have either a brace on my legs or have to live out of a wheel chair. I still shudder when I am near a person who has to wear a brace and I hear it snap into place.

It was medical research that kept me out of a wheel chair. I have a little difficulty touching my toes but other than that I am reasonably well; at one point was a long distance runner.

Medical research matters – and now those of us who live in Burlington are going to be given a chance to support cancer research.

The man who will entertain us on the 20th of August is dying of an incurable brain cancer. He will be on the stage giving it everything he has.

Gorn Downie of the tragically hip

Gord Downie, lead singer of the Tragically Hip, giving it everything he has. The Hips final concert on their Farewell Tour that will take place in Kingston is to be simulcast to the stage set up in Spencer Smith Park

We have an opportunity to give as well.

Go without something and put as much as you can into one of the two opportunities that have been set up.

This city raised just shy of $1 million two years ago for flood victims. The needed 100 days to make that happen. We have about 15 days – we can raise a lot of money in that time frame.

Don’t let Gord Downie down.

The huge screens will be set up on a stage immediately to the west of the Naval memorial – the event starts at 8:30 – this is a rain or shine evening – bring a blanket or a chair.  There will not be any alcohol available at this event nor will there be any sponsorship announcements.

Just the best the Tragically Hip has always done – being broadcast across the nation.

To donate to the Canadian Cancer Society (Halton Chapter)  click HERE or visit https://bit.ly/2azm5AN

To donate to the Joseph Brant Hospital Foundation click HERE or  visit https://bit.ly/2auf6Yc

Gord Downie - sitting

A pensive Gord Downie will entertain tens of thousands in a CBC broadcast of the final concert of the Farewell tour on August 20th.

getting new - yellow

If you want to keep up to the second on how the arrangements for the concert on the 20th are rolling out follow the #HipatSpencerSmith

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London beats Guelph in their first game of the IBL quarter finals - Bandits play Barrie again on Saturday

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 5th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

The bats of the Burlington Bandits were quiet Friday night

In London the Majors took the Guelph Royals in a 9-4 win.

Elis Jimenez struck out nine in seven innings to lead the first-place London Majors to a 9-4 win over the Guelph Royals in Game 1 of their best-of-seven quarter-final Friday night.

Jimenez (1-0) allowed three runs on seven hits and walked one.

At the plate, Chris McQueen had two hits, two RBI and three runs. RJ Fuhr singled, doubled and had an RBI and run, Byron Reichstein singled twice and drove in two, Michael Ambrose drilled a solo home run, Carlos Arteaga and Cleveland Brownlee each had an RBI, while LeJon Baker and Keith Kandel had two hits and a run apiece.

Eight of nine batters had at least one hit.

For eighth-place Guelph, Santino Silvestri, Matt Schmidt and Trevor Nyp all had a single and RBI. Patrick Coughlin drove in a run, and Aaron Loder added two hits and a run.

Alberto Rodriguez (0-1) took the loss, giving up six runs (five earned) on nine hits in 4.2 innings, walking three and striking out three.

2016 IBL quarter-finals
Series A
(1) London Majors vs (8) Guelph Royals
London leads series 1-0
Game 1: London 9, Guelph 4
Game 2: Saturday, Aug. 6 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at London; 1:05 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at London; 7:35 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at London; 7:35 p.m.

Series B
(2) Kitchener Panthers vs. (7) Hamilton Cardinals

Kitchener leads series 1-0

Game 1: Kitchener 12, Hamilton 6
Game 2: Saturday, Aug. 6 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Kitchener; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.

Series C
(3) Barrie Baycats vs. (6)Burlington Bandits

Barrie leads series 1-0

Game 1: Barrie 6, Burlington 1
Game 2: Saturday, Aug. 6 at Burlington; 7:05 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Barrie; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.

Series D
(4) Brantford Red Sox vs. (5)
Toronto Maple Leafs Series tied 1-1

Game 1: Brantford 9, Toronto 8 (10 innings)
Game 2: Toronto 6, Hamilton 5
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Toronto; 2 p.m.
Game 4: Wednesday, Aug. 10 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 5: Friday, Aug. 12 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 6: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Toronto; TBD *Game 7: Sunday, Aug. 14 at Brantford; 8 p.m.

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Are there new players sniffing around the air park property?

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

August 5th, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Air Park has taken on a legal life of its own that just may see Court cases that make their way to the Supreme Court of Canada – the issue is that significant to the municipal sector.

The judiciary and economic development are tied together, not always in the nicest or the most comfortable manner. One tends to bump into the other when interpretations of a bylaw or a regulation is needed. That bumping into each other has kept the city’s legal department busy

erty

Trucks dumped tonnes of land fill on the air park site without having a site alteration plan approved by the city.

There are people in Burlington who see very significant merit in their being a small well run airport in the rural part of the city.

Fill from the Air Park tumbles down a slope and rests against the property line fence of the Cousin's farm on Appleby Line. Water run off has flooded parts of the farm.

Fill from the Air Park tumbles down a slope and rests against the property line fence of the Cousin’s farm on Appleby Line. Water run off has flooded parts of the farm.

Most of the residents in north Burlington don’t have a problem with the air park – they do have a problem with what the owner of the property wants to do with the almost 200 acres of land that had 500,000 tonnes of land fill dumped on it without permission or acceptable testing by the municipal government.

Business people, especially those in the development field, understand what they call the long game – find property that will increase in value and has significant development potential and invest in it. Developers look for that patient money; the site one which the Bridgewater condominiums are being built first came to the public eye when Mayrose Tyco assembled that land in 1985.
The air park has been around for a long time; for the past decade or more it has been a contentious operation. The owner has brought a unique business style to how he has chosen to develop the opportunity he feels the site has and in the process has alienated his neighbours and run afoul of the city and to a lesser degree the Regional government.

The development game has changed; it is a lot more collaborative and developers are learning that municipalities have strengths they have not utilized in the past.

And Burlington is beginning to realize that citizen groups do not have to be just reactive to things they do not like but can be proactive and advocate for levels of change.

In Burlington the Sustainability Advisory Committee has real clout and influence; Heritage issues were basically outsourced to the Heritage Advisory Committee who put together a program that council liked. When the outline of that program was first revealed city council came close to giving the advisory committee a standing ovation.

There is room and opportunity now for responsible citizens groups to do their homework and take well researched proposals to city council.

While it will be a bit of a challenge for this city council, the time is ripe for city councils to listen more closely to some of the ideas that are brought forward.

There are also new and more collaboratively minded city staff who are capable of listening to the people who provide the money to meet the payroll.

Municipalities are at that talking the talk when the mention transparency – citizens have chosen to believe what they said and now expect those people to walk their talk. Done properly it comes out as responsible government – on of the corner stones this province was built on.

All the key players in the Airpark dispute:

All the key players in the Airpark dispute:

The time is not right yet to expect the kind of leadership that is needed from the elected officials; too much dead wood on the current Burlington council. But it is time and the opportunity is there for the private sector that is much more responsible than the development community has been in the past to quietly develop ideas and opportunities to advance potential

Getting any air park development in rural Burlington from economic developers is going to require more than just an initiative from the economic developers and consistent nudging from the city’s Economic Development Corporation.

The city itself has to realize the potential and want to see that potential grown and the people in rural Burlington are going to have to be a significant part of that process.

During a council chamber foyer conversation city manager Jeff Fielding made it very clear to Glenn Grenier that the city did not share his view that the Air Park did not have to comply with city bylaws. Grenier had positioned himself as a leading expert in aeronautical law and that the city should respect their rights. The city doesn't believe the Air Park actually has the rights they say they have.

During a council chamber foyer conversation, city manager Jeff Fielding made it very clear to Glenn Grenier, second from the left that the city did not share his view that the Air Park did not have to comply with city bylaws. Grenier had positioned himself as a leading expert in aeronautical law and that the city should respect their rights. The city didn’t believe the Air Park actually had the rights they said they have; that view was upheld by both a Superior |Court judge and an Appeal Court decision. The city’s legal counsel stand to the right.

A very small percentage of the people in Burlington are fully aware of the current air park issue and the legal battle that has been going on for more than five years. The upside to that battle is that it hasn’t cost the city all that much – their legal counsel keeps winning the court cases and getting costs on a rather financially attractive basis. It isn’t a profit centre but it is a nice way to do business.

When the rural community became aware of what at was going on they did what every community does; they formed an organization – the Rural Burlington Greenbelt Coalition, which itself is a collection of citizen interest groups – and delegated to city hall – very effectively. Monte Dennis had years of experience battling the development of the once planned airport at Pickering; he was part of that crew that did everything possible to prevent the destruction of a community when the province expropriated hundreds of acres of land for an airport development in Pickering. That was 40 years ago – the houses and community are gone – but there is no airport in Pickering.

Vanessa Warren delegated to city council on the landfill work being done at the Air Park and the impact it will have on her property - and the larger community as well.

Vanessa Warren delegated to city council on the landfill work being done at the Air Park and the impact it will have on her property – and the larger community as well.

Dennis Monte at Council

Monte Dennis delegating before city council.

If it wasn’t Dennis delegating for the RBGC at city hall or the Region, it would be Vanessa Warren who was always exceptionally well prepared: she tended to know more than anyone else in the room.

Despite the talent within the RBGC they have yet to capture the public imagination. A large part of that is their all but total reliance on social media to get their message out.

Social media has its place but it isn’t the silver bullet that always delivers.

Going forward one can hope that the RBGC people can learn to partner or at least collaborate with the better parts of the economic development community and make the best possible use of the air park property for both the land owner and the wider community without any development distorting or damaging the community.

Few in rural Burlington have a problem with a small private aircraft air park- many very close to the air park kind of like the sound of the light air craft landing and taking off.

Rossi-Vince-at-June-2013-meeting-Capstone

Vince Rossi, believed to be the sole owner of the Air Park.

There are opportunities for some “good jobs” economic development at the air park. Small engine maintenance – even possibly some mid-size aircraft maintenance. Properly managed the air park could handle much more small craft traffic.

RBGC needs to be before city council regularly, prodding and poking and providing the visionary leadership that is badly needed. They certainly have the talent and if they are consistent they should over time bring about the shift that is needed.

One wonders where the Regional government is in all this. There are dozens of municipalities that oversee the operation of small airports in their communities. Neither the chair or the region’s administration appear to have much in the way of appetite for an air park in Halton and Burlington’s city council representatives at the Region have never been able to pull together as a single cohesive voice that takes a position and makes it stick.

There is much work to be done.

Could the air park already be in play without the owner even knowing about it?

Full disclosure:Pepper Parr, publisher of the |Gazette, Monte Dennis and Vanessa were sued by the Air Park Inc for libel in 2013. The case has yet to get to trial.

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They are back - West Nile virus positive mosquitoes found in Burlington

News 100 redBy Staff

August 5th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

If the heat doesn’t get the best of us – something else will.

We are told that a batch of mosquitoes trapped this week in Burlington have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV).

This is the first WNV positive batch of mosquitoes collected from the city. An additional five batches of WNV positive mosquitoes were collected in Oakville. This year in Halton, there have been seven WNV positive mosquito batches to date.

WestNileVirus_transmission“Halton is committed to being safe and healthy and reducing West Nile virus in our communities through both education and preventative programs like larviciding,” said Dr. Hamidah Meghani, Halton Region Medical Officer of Health. “Until the hard frosts of fall set in, Halton residents should continue to protect themselves against mosquito bites and remove mosquito breeding sites.”

Urban areas are more likely to have mosquitoes that carry WNV. The types of mosquitoes that transmit WNV to humans most commonly breed in urban areas in places that hold water such as bird baths, plant pots, old toys, and tires.

The following are steps that residents can take to protect themselves and their families from mosquitoes:

• Cover up. Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved shirts and pants with tightly-woven fabric.
• Avoid being outdoors from early evening to morning when mosquitoes are most active and likely to bite, as well as at any time in shady, wooded areas.
• Reduce mosquito breeding sites around your home by getting rid of all water-filled containers and objects, where possible. Change the water in bird baths at least once per week.
• Use an approved insect repellent, such as one containing DEET or Icaridin.
• Make sure your window and door screens are tight and without holes, cuts or other openings.

A map showing the locations of standing water sites that have had larvicide applied this year is available at halton.ca/wnv.

To report standing water at public facilities or for more information about West Nile virus, please visit halton.ca/wnv, dial 311or e-mail wnv@halton.ca.

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The Children's Festival began 25 years ago - big birthday celebration on the 21st.

eventspink 100x100By Staff

August 5, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

Might be a little early to make solid plans – but you could pencil this one in as a possible – the city is celebrating the 25th anniversary of its Children’s Festival on Sunday, August 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Spencer Smith Park.

As they get a little older - they are ready for bigger challenges. This group works there way through a children's obstacle course.

As they get a little older – they are ready for bigger challenges. This group works there way through a children’s obstacle course.

“We are hosting a huge birthday party for children of all ages to help mark this special occasion,” said Chris Glenn, the city’s director of parks and recreation. “This festival is consistently named as one of the Top 100 festivals and events in Ontario and is the perfect opportunity for families to get out, be active and enjoy some time together at Burlington’s beautiful waterfront.”

Presented by Rocca Sisters and Associates, the theme of this year’s festival is a birthday party. Children at the event can enjoy a number of activities and shows on the main stage, presented by Family Jr.:

Kids + water = fun and noise - all part of the Halton Children's Water Festival. A full day of fun at a cost of $5 per student.

Kids + water = fun and noise – all part of a day in the park.

• Main stage shows with Interactive DJ, Isabella Hoops, Mega Magic and Mystic Drumz
• Meet the characters from Paw Patrol and Star Wars from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m
• Roaming entertainment with Jungle Jack, Nick’s Juggling Family, CLaroL the CLown and stilt walkers
• Face painting and balloon animals
• Crafts
• Inflatables
• Kids’ marketplace
• Play zones

Admission to this accessible event is free. Consider walking or riding a bike to the festival.

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Influential moral philosopher describes part of what is going on in the American presidential election.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

August 5th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Our political correspondent, Ray Rivers, is working up a pair of articles on the United States presidential race and comparing the situation down there with how our democracy is working in Canada.

on bullshitWhen Rivers writes, as publisher he and I trade notes and thoughts on the direction his thinking is taking. My role is to support the writer. As I was reading through my own sources I came across a book On Bullshit, by Harry G. Frankfurt, a professor of philosophy emeritus at Princeton University and recognized as one of the world’s most influential moral philosophers

Here is what he has to say on that subject:

“One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit. Everyone knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the situation for granted. Most people are rather confident of their ability to recognize bullshit and to avoid being taken in by it. So the phenomenon has not aroused much deliberate concern. We have no clear understanding of what bullshit is, why there is so much of it, or what functions it serves. And we lack a conscientiously developed appreciation of what it means to us. In other words, as Harry Frankfurt writes, “we have no theory.”

Fareed Zakaria, writing in the Washington Post said: “Frankfurt, one of the world’s most influential moral philosophers, attempts to build such a theory here. With his characteristic combination of philosophical acuity, psychological insight, and wry humor, Frankfurt proceeds by exploring how bullshit and the related concept of humbug are distinct from lying. He argues that bullshitters misrepresent themselves to their audience not as liars do, that is, by deliberately making false claims about what is true. In fact, bullshit need not be untrue at all.

“Rather, bullshitters seek to convey a certain impression of themselves without being concerned about whether anything at all is true. They quietly change the rules governing their end of the conversation so that claims about truth and falsity are irrelevant. Frankfurt concludes that although bullshit can take many innocent forms, excessive indulgence in it can eventually undermine the practitioner’s capacity to tell the truth in a way that lying does not. Liars at least acknowledge that it matters what is true. By virtue of this, Frankfurt writes, bullshit is a greater enemy of the truth than lies are.”

This viewpoint and the role bullshit plays in our political lives at every level is not limited to the United States.

The book was a New York Times #1 Best Seller. No bullshit!

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Bandits lose their first of seven game quarter finals to Barrie; meet again on Saturday at Nelson Park

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 5th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Bandits lost the first game of a seven game quarter finals series. The Barrie Baycats took the game 6-1.

Jeff Cowan singled and drove in three for Barrie, which leads the best-of-seven quarter-final 1-0. Kyle DeGrace doubled, scored once and had an RBI, Jordan Castaldo had two hits and scored twice, and Steve Lewis added an RBI.

Emilis Guerrero (1-0) went eight innings for the win, allowing one run on five hits, striking out three and walking one.

Nolan Pettipiece had a sacrifice fly for the Bandits and picked up one of five hits. Robert Tavone singled and scored.

Ryan Beckett (0-1) went 6.2 innings and allowed five runs on five hits, walking five and striking out two.

In Kitchener the Panthers won over the Hamilton Cardinals in that first-round playoff series with a 12-6 win Thursday night.

Tanner Nivins, Jonathan Brouse and Sean Reilly all homered in the victory. Nivins added a single, double, two RBI and two runs, and Reilly also doubled and scored twice. Brouse’s home run was solo.

Mike Gordner singled, doubled and drove in two runs, Frank Camilo Morejon had two hits, two runs and an RBI, Justin Interisano singled and scored twice, and Mike Glinka and Mike Andrulis each drove in a run.

Ian Rendon (1-0) went six innings for the win, allowing two runs on six hits, striking out eight and walking four.

For the Cardinals, Chris Beer had two hits, two RBI and two runs. Liam Wilson singled three times and drove in a run, Geoffrey Soto had two hits and an RBI, Tyler Hardie went 3-for-5 with a run, Lake Molleson singled, doubled and had an RBI, and Jake Foden drove in a run.

Chris Lazar (0-1) went 3.2 innings, giving up nine runs (four earned) on nine hits, walking four without striking out a batter.

In Toronto the Leafs turned a dramatic loss in the first game of their series into a 6-5 win over the Brantford Red Sox.

Justin Marra singled home Dan Marra with two out in the bottom of the ninth to give the Leafs a Thursday night and tie the best-of-seven quarter-final at 1-1.

Brantford won the opener Wednesday with a walkoff in the 10th inning and started Game 2 by scoring once in the first and twice in the second for a 3-0 lead. Toronto played catch-up most of the game and finally scored twice to tie it at five in the eighth, setting up the ninth-inning rally that started with nobody on and two outs.

Ryan White singled and hit a solo home run for the Leafs. Justin Marra finished with two hits and two RBI, Dan Marra singled, doubled and scored twice, Jon Waltenbury had three hits and a run, Brendan Keys had two hits and an RBI, and Jonathan Solazzo had an RBI.

Marek Deska (1-0) threw a perfect inning of relief for the win, striking out one. Brett van Pelt started and went seven innings, allowing four runs on eight hits, striking out four and walking two.

Dan Jagdeo had a solo home run and RBI double for the Red Sox. Chris Dennis and Wayne Forman each had a hit and RBI, Nic Burdett singled, doubled and scored twice, and Benjamin Bostick had a double and two runs.

Matt Martinow (0-1) took the loss, allowing a run on three hits in 1.1 innings, walking one. Starter Riley Barr went seven innings and gave up four runs on seven hits, striking out five and walking one.

2016 IBL quarter-finals

Series A
London Majors vs Guelph Royals
Game 1: Friday, August 5 at London; 7:35 p.m.
Game 2: Saturday, August 6 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, August 7 at London; 1:05 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, August 9 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, August 11 at London; 7:35 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, August 12 at Guelph; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, August 13 at London; 7:35 p.m.

Series B
Kitchener Panthers vs. Hamilton Cardinals
Kitchener leads series 1-0
Game 1: Kitchener 12, Hamilton 6
Game 2: Saturday, Aug. 6 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Kitchener; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Hamilton; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Kitchener; 7 p.m.

Series C
Barrie Baycats vs. Burlington Bandits Barrie leads series 1-0
Game 1: Barrie 6, Burlington 1
Game 2: Saturday, Aug. 6 at Burlington; 7:05 p.m.
Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Barrie; 7 p.m.
Game 4: Tuesday, Aug. 9 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 5: Thursday, Aug. 11 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 6: Friday, Aug. 12 at Burlington; 7:30 p.m.
*Game 7: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Barrie; 7:30 p.m.

Series D
Brantford Red Sox vs. Toronto Maple Leafs Series tied 1-1
Game 1: Brantford 9, Toronto 8 (10 innings)
Game 2: Toronto 6, Hamilton 5 Game 3: Sunday, Aug. 7 at Toronto; 2 p.m.
Game 4: Wednesday, Aug. 10 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 5: Friday, Aug. 12 at Brantford; 8 p.m.
*Game 6: Saturday, Aug. 13 at Toronto; TBD

*Game 7: Sunday, Aug. 14 at Brantford; 8 p.m.

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Jazz on Friday - dancers on Saturday - Performing Art Centre has become a happening place.

eventspink 100x100By Pepper Parr

August 4th, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Once you’ve taken in the Jazz event Friday evening at the Performing arts Centre, at which Brian Dean, chief honcho for the Downtown Business Association will be MC – you might want to mosey on over to the same location and try Intersection Dance.

And what, you might ask is that? Intersection Dance is an open air celebration of dance for all! Each event will be part performance and part dance lesson. Come and see incredible dance in a summer setting and learn some moves from the artists.
Saturday, August 6 from 3:00pm – 4:30pm on the Plaza at 440 Locust Street

intersectionAUG6-smallOne of the most impressive free form dancers we have seen will be leading the group through an original dance piece being created for the by Lisa Emmons, Artistic Director of Form Contemporary Dance Theatre.

You will get to see the work in progress. Lisa will be collaborating with a collective of dancers representing three communities: Burlington, Milton and Oakville. After the performance the collective will receive “notes” and invite the audience to comment or make suggestions. These ideas will be considered as the piece is finalized for performances during Culture Days in the fall.

They will certainly be animating Locust Street Saturday afternoon.

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Two years ago this evening thousand of homes in the city had basements filled with rain water.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 4th, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

This time two years ago thousands of families in the city were scrambling to recover from a rainfall that flooded their homes while the city moved into serious damage control mode.

The rain began in the early afternoon of the August holiday, it seemed at first, like just another summer rain storm but it shut down  the events at LaSalle Park where Joseph Brant Day was being celebrated.– at about 4 pm people began to realize there was a serious problem.

It was a holiday weekend and a lot of people were out of town. The Mayor was at his cottage, the acting city manager was at his cottage and out of cell phone reach. Then city general manager Scott Stewart was holding the fort and pulling in all the senior people he could find.

Flood-rainfall-graphic-weather-network-image

The data available several weeks after the storm showed just how local it was.

Tony Bavota, the fire chief, was getting reports but wasn’t experiencing as much as a drop of rain where he lived.

Underpasses were filling up with water.

Flood presentation - damage to the creeks - water flow

Every creek in the east end of the city broke its banks pushing branches and tree stumps that became battering rams that did major damage.

The creeks on the east side of the city had burst their banks and could not manager the torrent of water that was roaring down.

Tuck Creek, Sheldon Creek along with the others in the eastern part of the had burst their banks and were doing significant damage.

There was very little in the way of media. The publisher of the Gazette was bailing water from the basement of the house he lived in.

The police at the Burlington detachment had to move all their vehicles to higher ground. Officers working at the desk had to walk on squishy floors.

The city got 191 mm of rain in just hours – most of it went looking for a place to flow – the creeks were a natural route to take.

Weeks after the event all kinds of data was available but the days of the flood and several days after that there was nothing but confusion.

FLOOD man walking in water Harvester Road sign

Drivers found the water rising far more rapidly than they expected – many had to abandon vehicles.

The Region did move very quickly and made some short term funds available to several hundred people. The city turned to the province for help and learned about a thing called ODRAP –  Ontario Disaster Relied Aid Program that called for the city to declare there was an emergency and then create a committee to raise funds locally that would be matched on a two for one basis by the province.

The  program rules required the city to back away and let the local community organization handle the raising of funds.

Meanwhile the city began repairing the damage to the city infrastructure – the creeks has to be cleaned up, sidewalks that were literally lifted and moved yards down the road had to be repaired.  The city was responsible for fixing the infrastructure – social services was a regional responsibility.

Flood - Hodgson Peter - flood maps

Retired police officer Peter Hodgson took charge of the Red Cross effort which was to look at every home in the flood area and determine the level of damage.

The Red Cross was brought in to do the immediate survey work to determine what the damage was on a house by house basis.  The members of council for the east end of the city found themselves wading through basements with water up to their knees – but there wasn’t much else they could do.

The Burlington Community Foundation (BCF) was given the task of raising the funds needed  and in a short 100 days raised just shy of $1 million.

Flood - Meed Ward with Peter Hodgeson + T shirt

There was no missing the message – the city mobilized itself very quickly to help.

There were some delicate backroom differences of opinion between the city and the province over whether or not Burlington was going to get any provincial support.  Newly elected MPP Eleanor McMahon had an opportunity to deliver some choice words to her provincial government peers on what Burlington needed.

The BCF did superb work helping people fill in the appropriate forms and convince dozens of corporations to write cheques.  All but one of the major banks came through big time.  A major consumer products company, who shall go nameless, couldn’t find as much as a dime for the people that clog their store regularly.

Fortino Flood cashiers Oct 22-14 010

Fortinos turned their fund raising software over to the community and had their cashiers asking for donations.

One of the supermarket chains made their back end computer system available for the collection of donations.

There were hundreds of small kind acts done.  One woman went door to door with green garbage bags offering to take in laundry for people who had lost their washers and driers.

One citizen found some warehouse space where donated furniture could be stored for those who would need it later.

Flood UpCreek fod lines

The people of Elwood Street lined up to buy the cupcakes and the T shirts and the hot dogs to raise funds for their neighbours.

One street decided to hold what they thought was going to be a small fund raiser for a senior who needed some help – the Burlington Teen Tour Band came marching up the street the day of the event bringing tears to they eyes of man.

That small street managed to raise more in the way of real cash than one of the major service clubs.  The city was experiencing its citizens coming out to help.

Flood Foxcroft at BMO hands out full upright

There wasn’t an arm that Ron Foxcroft didn’t twist to raise the close to $1 million needed in a 100 day period.

Ron Foxcroft began to look like that Energizer bunny in the battery advertisements – he was everywhere chasing cheques and badgering people to add a couple of zeros to what they were giving.

What was remarkable about this natural event was that it ruined some families and at the same time people just blocks away experienced nothing.

It was like one of those tornadoes that ripped through a street, tore out five or six houses and left everything else standing.  The city had never experience anything like this before.

We learned that the downspouts that took rain from the eaves troughs were pouring water into a system of pipes that couldn’t manage the flow.  We leaned that those catch basis in back yards that had been covered by grass really were an important part of storm water management.

We learned that those swales between our houses were there for a purpose.

And we learned how to pull together as a community to help each other.

After some of the finest work any community organization has done – the Burlington Community Foundation did a re-branding and  took the word community out of their corporate name – go figure.

 

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First game in IBL quarter finals lasts nearly five hours. Burlington goes against Barrie tonight.

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 4, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

It took 10 innings, nine pitchers and nearly five hours, but the Brantford Red Sox took Game 1 of the IBL quarter-final series against the Toronto Maple Leafs.

IBL Aug 3Dennon Koziol’s two-out single scored Chris Dennis to give the Red Sox a dramatic 9-8 win at Arnold Anderson Stadium.

The fourth-place Red Sox prevailed despite blowing a one-run lead in the top of the ninth. Toronto scored three runs and was on the verge of stealing home field, but Brantford scored twice in the bottom of the inning to send the game to extras.

Ricky Murray went 2-for-5 with a home run and two RBI for the Red Sox. Jeff Hunt doubled and drove in two, Josh McCurdy had two hits, an RBI and run, while Dan Jagdeo, Lee Delfino and Brandon Dailey all drove in a run. Nic Burdett singled twice and scored once.

Trevor Bayless (1-0) picked up the win, allowing three runs on five hits in two innings of relief. Bayless, who was the fourth Brantford reliever, struck out three and didn’t walk a batter.

Red Sox starter Nathan Forer went five innings and gave up five runs on 10 hits, striking out five and walking four.

Grant Tamane led the Leafs 16-hit attack with four singles. Tamane drove in two and scored three times. Sean Mattson had two hits and three RBI, Justin Marra added two hits, an RBI and run, Dan Marra singled and doubled, Connor Lewis had three singles and a run, and Jonathan Solazzo had an RBI.

Solazzo (0-1) also took the loss on the mound, yielding an unearned run on one hit in 1.2 innings. Solazzo struck out two and walked two.

Leafs starter Justin Cicatello went eight innings and gave up six runs on 10 hits, striking out four and walking three.

Game 2 is Thursday in Toronto at 7:30 p.m.

Future games:
Thursday, Aug. 4
Brantford at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Burlington at Barrie, 7:30 p.m.
Hamilton at Kitchener, 7:30 p.m.

Friday, Aug. 5
Guelph at London, 7:35 p.m.

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Burlington as a convention destination? You heard it here first and there is a guy in this city who makes things like this happen.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

August 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

This story has been revised – the number of hotel rooms is closer to 300 + than 500 as originally reported.

Frank McKeown has got part of it figured out.

He is tasked with bringing corporations to the city that will employ people in high tech, high paying jobs – the sort of thing that L3 Wescam does on the North Service Road. Few people know they produce some of the best visual surveillance equipment in the world.

Here is how they tell just a part of their story.

WESCAM has an airborne portfolio of multi-sensor, multi-spectral systems that are deployed worldwide, at varying ranges, and with overlapping fields-of-view, creating the opportunity for uninterrupted surveillance of boarders, forward operating bases, airfields and other vital assets.

McKeown wants more of that kind of company here. But, he will tell you, “companies don’t just up and move every day of the week”.

Three structure project has been the "in the works" since 1985 when developers were given the right to build a 22 storey plus building on the property where the Riviera Waterfront Motel used to exist.

The structure on the corner is going to be a nine storey building with 150+ rooms and convention facilities. A 2018 opening date is the plan.

He knows that Burlington has a great story to tell any organization thinking about a move – and the Burlington Economic Development Corporation does a darn good job of getting the story out – but there is only so much that can be done in terms of promotion.

McKeown will tell you that it is pretty much a belly to belly business. You need to be in front of the people who make the decisions – which isn’t easy.

Waterfront hotel with pier at foot

Tear this one down – build a new one of at least 20 stories along with a second structure close to the water and you have a small cluster of accommodation that can attract small conventions.

But McKeown thinks he has an angle that will work for him and for the city.

The city has a stunning development going up along Lakeshore – the Bridgewater condominium with its 22 stories that will soar into the sky and will be part of a three tower complex that will include a four star Marriott hotel with several hundred rooms.

Yards to the west there are plans for a major redevelopment of the existing Waterfront Hotel. The thinking is for a two or three building project that will be oriented to the west with the view right along Spencer Smith Park’s Naval Promenade.

With two hotels that will have something in the order of 300 rooms and a Performing Arts Centre that can hold 700 people in its Main Theatre, Burlington is suddenly well positioned to become a small convention destination.

Frank McKeough, former Chief of Staff to MAyor Rick Goldring asked about how politicians can handle complex issues when voters tend not to be informed and don't have the background needed to arrive at decisions.

Frank McKeown, former Chief of Staff to Mayor Rick Goldring is now the Executive Director of the Burlington Economic Development Corporation.

Making this work for the city will mean a total transformation of the current Tourism office operation. More selling power on the team – and then getting out there and learning who is holding their convention when and making a pitch for their business.

Burlington has a very unique story to tell and a lovely setting.

BPAC raod not done yet

A great locale for small convention events – has the Performing Arts Centre team begun to think how they will work with the Tourism office and the two new hotels we will have within five years?

That Marriott hotel isn’t open yet but it isn’t too early to start pitching for that convention business. Is there anyone in the Tourism office talking to the hotel people and planning on how that convention business can be brought to town?

McKeown will be away for some holiday – and he is said to be taking up Wednesday golf in a serious way. Great business gets done on golf courses.

We will wait to hear what the Tourism office has in terms of a work plan for the balance of 2016 and 2017.

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Performing Arts Centre rolls out its free summer program.

eventspink 100x100By Staff

April 3rd, 2106

BURLINGTON, ON

The Performing Arts centre people have upped their game. Hard on the heels of a very successful event last summer they have expanded the program from a number of evenings of Jazz on the Plaza to a series of events that includes Sunday programs for families and a Tuesday evening that covers a number of musical genres.

BPAC-full-front1-1024x624

That plaza will be packed on Tuesday, Fridays and |Sunday during the month of August as the Performing Arts Centre shows its appreciation for the just under $1 million subsidy they get from the city.

A free evening of entertainment every Tuesday in August, featuring musical performances across a range of genres. The bar will be open and a variety of snacks available. In the event of rain, the performance will be moved inside.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 Stacey Lee Gusé
TUESDAY, AUGUST 9 Dave Barrett Trio with Michael Sadler (SAGA)
TUESDAY, AUGUST 16 Bravura
TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 Poor Angus

Friday is the Jazz evening – on the Plaza from 6:30pm – 8:30pm Bar will be open – cash only.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 Ricochet – Led by Adrean Farrugia
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12 Rob Tardik
FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 Barbra Lica
FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 Vincent Wolfe and The VegasNorth Seven

SUNDAY FAMILY FUN Sunday afternoons – 2:00pm – 5:00pm – free family fun, from music, to dance, to games, to sing-a-longs and more, there will be something for everyone! A variety of snacks and drinks will be available to keep youngsters and their parents energized throughout the afternoon. In the event of rain, the performance will be moved inside.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7 The Monkey Bunch / Mark Correia
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14 Singalong Tim and The Pacifiers / The Sentimentalists
SUNDAY, AUGUST 21 Sonshine and Broccoli / Phil The Magic Guy

The program was very popular its first year – it was hard to get a place to sit.

The city shuts down streets for many events – it would create a lot more space for people to sit and enjoy the music if that short block of Locust was traffic free for these events.  It could double the capacity.

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Quarter finals in the IBL begin tonight - Bandits play their first game against Barrie in Barrie on Thursday - at home on Saturday.

sportsgold 100x100By Staff

August 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The road to the Dominico Cup starts tonight when the 2016 Intercounty Baseball League playoffs begin with the Toronto Maple Leafs meeting the Brantford Red Sox in Brantford.

On Thursday, the Kitchener Panthers, who finished second in the league, will open their quarter-final series against the seventh-place Hamilton Cardinals.

The end to winter must be in sight - the Bandits have announced a TryOut camp.

And he is out – the Bandits hope to be able to do this many times in the quarter finals.

The Barrie Baycats opendefence of their championship at home against the Burlington Bandits.

The pennant winning London Majors open their series against the Guelph Royals on Friday at Labatt Park in London.

All quarter-final series are best-of-seven.

Series “A”
London vs. Guelph
Game 1 – Fri, August 5 at London; 7:35 pm Game 2 – Sat, August 6 at Guelph; 7:30 pm Game 3 – Sun, August 7 at London; 1:05 pm Game 4 – Tue, August 9 at Guelph; 7:30 pm *Game 5 – Thu, August 11 at London; 7:35 pm *Game 6 – Fri, August 12 at Guelph; 7:30 pm *Game 7 – Sat, August 13 at London; 7:35 pm

Series “B”
Kitchener vs. Hamilton
Game 1 – Thu, August 4 at Kitchener; 7:30 pm Game 2 – Sat, August 6 at Hamilton; 7:30 pm Game 3 – Sun, August 7 at Kitchener; 7:00 pm Game 4 – Tue, August 9 at Hamilton; 7:30 pm *Game 5 – Thu, August 11 at Kitchener; 7:30 pm *Game 6 – Fri, August 12 at Hamilton; 7:30 pm *Game 7 – Sat, August 13 at Kitchener; 7:00 pm

Scott Robertson - in full array, is the owner of the Burlington Bandits and also co-chair of the This Magic Moment event.

Scott Robertson – in full array, is one of the owners of the Burlington Bandits.

Series “C”
Barrie vs. Burlington
Game 1 – Thu, August 4 Barrie; 7:30 pm
Game 2 – Sat, August 6 Burlington; 7:05 pm Game 3 – Sun, August 7 Barrie; 7:00 pm Game 4 – Tue, August 9 Burlington; 7:30 pm *Game 5 – Thu, August 11 Barrie; 7:30 pm *Game 6 – Fri, August 12 Burlington; 7:30 pm *Game 7 – Sat, August 13 Barrie; 7:00 pm

Series “D”
Brantford vs. Toronto
Game 1 – Wed, August 3 at Brantford; 8:00 pm Game 2 – Thu, August 4 at Toronto; 7:30 pm Game 3 – Sun, August 7 at Toronto; 2:00 pm Game 4 – Wed, August 10 at Brantford; 8:00 pm *Game 5 – Fri, August 12 at Brantford; 8:00 pm *Game 6 – Sat, August 13 at Toronto; 2:00 pm *Game 7 – Sun, August 14 at Brantford; 8:00 pm

* If necessary

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Have you been to WAG - it's where the animals gather. City is thinking of a larger off leash area - want your input.

News 100 blueBy Staff

August 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

It is all going to the dogs!

The woof woofs just might be getting one of the places in Burlington with a view that is to almost die for – Bayview Park.

The city is asking: Do you and your canine best friend use the leash-free area in Bayview Park?

If you do, the City of Burlington wants to hear your opinion about a possible leash-free area for small dogs.

We are looking at:

• Expanding the size of the total leash-free area from one hectare to 1.5 hectares
• Creating a separate leash-free area for small dogs only
• New six-foot (two-metre) high chain link fence with two double gate entrances
• Relocating the entrances
• Providing an accessible pathway from the existing parking lot into both of the leash-free areas
• Installing a new shelter in the small dog leash-free area.

Bayview Park at 1800 King Rd. is also known as W.A.G. (Where Animals Gather) Park. If you use the park, please take a moment to answer this short poll at www.burlington.ca/leashfree.

Bayview Park graphic

The park has one of the best views of the Skyway bridge – you can see the ships coming and going. King Road is also the road that the city closes in the spring so the Jefferson Salamanders can do what they do to increase their population. The road closure takes place further up King Road.

There is an added feature in taking your dog to this park – it is a nice way to get out of the city and on occasions a model Airplane club sends their small craft soaring through the skies. These guys are serious people and they have some pretty impressive model airplanes.

dogs-off-leash-opening

This off leash park is in Toronto. The parks offer a different level of civil society – not even a hint of stress. Must be nice.

Vote for the park – convince the city to make it as big as they can so the woof woofs have all kinds of space to run around. Convince them to create a shelter as well.

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Local talent to be given a chance to perform outside the doors of the two theatres of the Performing Arts Centre.

artsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

August 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

The Burlington Performing Arts Centre is accepting submissions from local artists for the Culture Days celebrations in the Theatre Lobby to take place on Sunday October 2nd, 2016.

These are curated performances event taking place from 12pm -4pm, in conjunction with other activities. The call is for artists in the community to have a 15-minute performance highlight on the lobby stage. There are only eight slots available.

Here is the Burlington Teen Tour Band opening up the Performing Arts Centre. Imagine them doing the same thing on the pier. Going to be a glorious sight.

The Family room being put to spectacular use – the Performing Arts Centre wants to make the space available to local talent during Culture Days in the fall.

As part of the Community Initiative for Culture Days in Burlington, we are looking for amateur talent in Burlington and surrounding areas to showcase our local artists or acts and to introduce these artists to our patrons and to a wider audience as well as to showcase culture in Burlington.

This can also assist any local artist or group who are on their way to becoming better known in the community or even pursuing the goal of becoming professional.

There is an honorarium for these performances and the artists will get an opportunity to promote their brand at that time, while reaching a new audience. The artists may also be added to the City of Burlington’s Artists database, with their permission.

We are looking for singer/songwriters, singers of pop, jazz, blues, folk, musical theatre and classical music, bands or combos, instrumentalists and soloists: classical, jazz, etc.

Please submit by email to: BPACsubmissions@burlington.ca with Culture Days in the Subject line.  Includde a couple of photos, a short bio and some background information along with a short description of the act or performer, any links to YouTube videos, if you have them, and of course, contact information.

Dateline for submissions is August 26th, 2016.

There are only eight spots available; only those acts or artists selected will be contacted.

Costin Manu, Community Engagement Manager for the Centre, has been working at getting something going in the lobby of the Performing Arts centre since he arrived. It will be interesting to see how this works out – it will also be interesting to see how the city and the Performing Arts centre manage to collaborate on making the Cultural Days event in Burlington work. There didn’t seem to be all that much co-operating between the two – each sort of did their own thing – and it showed.

The Centre has a strong Jazz program on the plaza during August – details in the next edition of the Gazette.

Earlier this year the Art \gallery of Burlington rented the Main Theatre and put the lobby – which we thought was named the Family Room – and put it to excellent use.

The Burlington Teen Tour Band took over the FAmily Room of the Burlington Performing Arts Centre the day the city turned the building over to the community.

The Burlington Teen Tour Band took over the Family Room of the Burlington Performing Arts Centre the day the city turned the building over to the community.

When the Performing Arts Centre opened there was an afternoon when all of the Burlington Teen Tour Band marched in through the east side sliding doors and gave that space life and energy it has never seen before.

The Centre management has yet to “animate” the space as well since.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream to be performed at the RBG Rock Garden by Tottering Biped - unlike any you've seen before.

artsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

August 3rd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

It isn’t summer if someone somewhere doesn’t do a Shakespeare play.

Debra Pickfield,of ThinkSpot fame, brought the Driftwood Theatre Company to Lowville for the third year and now the Tottering Biped Theatre is going to be at what Trevor Copp calls RBG’s stunning new outdoor Rock Gardens where they will be staging ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’… “unlike any you’ve seen before”.

Midsummer Nights dream graphic

It will be a Mid summer night the likes of which you have never seen before.

Copp describes the production thusly: “Spurred on by their amorous and ambitious dreams, aspiring actors, lovers, and fairies meet in the woods of their sleeping minds in this highly physical adaptation of the classic play.”

Copp adds” “We’ve noticed the difficulty emerging artists have here in getting off the ground – and we lose artistic talent to Toronto/further cities every year as a result.

“So in casting this piece, we searched this area’s post-secondary theatre programs for the most talented senior students/recent graduates – and offered them paid theatre work; unprecedented in our area.

“In supporting this show, you’re teaching the next generation that being an artist doesn’t mean moving away.

It will be on at the Royal Botanical Gardens Rock Garden on:

August 10th @ 7pm
August 11th @ 7pm
August 12th @ 7pm
August 13th @ 7pm
August 14th @ 7pm

August 17th @ 7pm
August 18th @ 7pm
August 19th @ 7pm
August 20th @ 7pm
August 21st @ 7pm

Make a dinner reservation at the Rock Garden Cafe before enjoying Shakespeare by Nature’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

$35.00 per person
Seating promptly at 5pm

5:30PM to 7:00PM – Garden opens to those who have purchased tickets and made restaurant reservations
7:00PM to 9:00PM – Performance

Fees:
Non-member Adults: $25.00
Member Adults: $20.00
Non-member & Member children (ages 4-12): $20.00
Child under the age of 3: Free

Tickets available online at:

https://tickets.rbg.ca/PEO/daily_events_list.asp

 

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New Street from Guelph Line east is now open - transit route changes to be effective August 14th.

News 100 redBy Staff

August 2nd, 2016

BURLINGTON, ON

Progress we think – and as one of those people who lived at the intersection of New Street and Guelph Line – we are all mighty pleased that we no longer have to dodge construction equipment and work our way around pot holes that pull hub caps off the vehicle

Many of us think the Regional chair owes us at least one car wash – the dust was incredible.

Then interim director of transit - now the newly minted Director of Transit for the city of Burlington, Mike Spicer replaces Donna Sheppard who retired as Director last August.

Director of Transit for the city of Burlington, Mike Spicer serving as a Court Jester?

The city transit people has announced schedule adjustments that begin August 14 upon completion of New Street construction.
Schedule adjustments effective August 14, 2016.

Routes 10 and 20 will return to normal routing upon completion of the New Street construction project. Minor adjustments have also been made to select trips on routes: 1, 11, 80 and 101.

New Street construction

The intention is to replace water and sewage pipe lines all along New street and add bicycle lanes on a trial basis as well east of Guelph Line.

Use the new Trip Planner and Next Bus link to know when the bus will depart in real-time. Add tripplanner.burlington.ca to your favourites or call the automated phone system 905-639-0550 and enter in your Stop ID.

The last we heard was that the Trip Planner and Next Bu link were getting a technical touch up. We never heard back from the transit people.

We will now give that service a test and let you know how it is doing.

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