Sports clinic owner looking at a million dollar claim for space they don't occupy - colourful situation

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 27th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The pandemic is hurting a lot of small business people.

Some of the claims being made by landlords border on the egregious.

The Elliott Sports Medicine Clinic is going through a very difficult period – they have managed to pivot and get back on their feet – the problem now is the lawsuit for very close to a million dollars.

$947,701.20 to be exact.

This from a landlord they have been with for 19 years.

Their rent each month was $12,800. The negotiations that stared at the end of March to renew the lease which was coming to an end in October had not gone well.

Elliott Erin MacLean

Erin MacLean

In March, with everything locked down Erin Maclean and her partner reached out to their landlord to discuss the problem they faced.

Everyone in the services or hospitality sector was scrambling – things were very tough.

One of the most successful hospitality venues, Emma’s Back Porch, chose to declare corporate bankruptcy and walk away from what the owner saw as a dire financial future.

Elliott Sports Medicine found themselves in much the same situation. Suddenly they could no longer conduct their business – they laid off the ten staff and began to wonder what they could do – what were their options ?

They immediately met with their landlord and laid all their cards on the table.

The landlord at first appeared amenable. The lease was due for renewal in eight months. MacLean was taken aback by the rent increase that was being asked for – $17,000.

“We reached out to our landlord in the middle of March being open, honest and upfront about our position due to Covid. We had been with this same landlord for 19 years – we expected to be able to work with him”, said MacLean.

“By that time we had laid off all of our employees and were effectively closed as a business and had no idea what the future held.

“We were never late or delayed in paying our very high rent anytime over the past 20 years.

“Rent relief was not something our landlord was interested in – unless the lease we had was renewed.

“The landlord wanted a rent increase to $17,000 a month and personal guarantees.

“After many, many long negotiations we decided not to renew the lease but to look for a new location.

Elliott Clinic

They gave their notice – didn’t realize that the lease had been renewed.

“We gave notice on June 4, 2020.

“We learned then that our landlord had taken the position that because we had not given six months’ notice the landlord decided to take the position that our lease was automatically renewed until 2025.”

In the middle of May (during negotiations) MacLean received a letter from the landlord demanding all the rent due be brought up to date; they were forced to pay, using borrowed money, for the almost three months they were closed.

“On June 4th we gave our landlord written notice of our final decision to stay in the premises until our lease expired on October 4th 2020.

“We moved on October 2nd having fulfilled and paid our lease in full.

“After some time, we were served with a claim that was filed with the Superior Court of Ontario in Toronto for $947,701.20 plus 18% interest per annum. The landlord as Plaintiff could have chosen the Superior Court in either Milton or Hamilton (anywhere in the province actually) – the Toronto choice would appear to have been strategic.

The corporation suing the clinic is 1100 Walkers Line Inc., which appears to be owned by Kamisa Investment Inc.; both are owned by a “prominent” businessman.

The 1100 Walkers line property a six story office building just off Walkers Line, has an interesting history of its own.

The land on which the office tower, completed in 2015, had been purchased by the City of Burlington for $5.4 million.

Walkers-North-Service-location-aerial with creek border

The owner of this property had plans to develop it beyond the single storey structure. His plans did not fit with the developing IKEA Plans. That red line is where Tuck Creek flows.

Walkers-North-Service-Hopewell-site

This is where IKEA wanted to relocate their Aldershot operation. They were going to build a bigger store and add quite a few head office jobs as well. The city went along with Official Plan and zoning changes. The Conservation Authority would not go along with the parking plans close to Tuck Creek. The green line is Tuck Creek.

The sale was a complex transaction. The owner of the property back in 2014 wanted to tear down a two story building and put up a larger building. An application was submitted to the planning department.

Walkers-North-service- city buys slice

City needed the piece outlined in red if the IKEA development was going to work.

Walkers-North-Service-left - owner gets to keep balance

Property owner got to keep the balance and put up a six storey building.

For reason which are not clear to this day the city moved to purchase the property because at the time IKEA was working through an application to move their operation from Aldershot to a property on the North Service Road west of Walkers Line.

Tuck Creek ran between the 1100 Wellington property and the land IKEA wanted to build on.

Also – at the time the Ministry of Transportation had concerns with the ramps that led off Walkers Line which was reaching a capacity point.

For Erin MacLean they are now in a new location running the business as well as we can with the Covid limitations.

The only difference is someone wants a million dollars from us – which we don’t have.

Related news story:

Property has a colourful history – and an astounding price

 

 

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Working through what they want to study next is going to be virtual for HDSB grade 9 students

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 27th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

A question that might be asked is – how much more of the direction, education and guidance for students will be delivered virtually?

It's not the kind of high school you were used to - MORE HERE

Students in a cooking class – part of the Pathway offerings.

The Halton District School Board will be holding a A Future that Fits pathways virtual event on Thursday, Dec. 3 from 1:30-2:45 p.m. for Grade 10 students. It will be hosted on a dedicated website and students will attend virtually as part of their regularly scheduled afternoon class.

A Future that Fits encourages HDSB Grade 10 students to explore a variety of career and Pathway program possibilities. Students will be able to interact with teachers in different sessions, view pop-up testimonial videos from former students and explore various program brochures.

Hunt Gibbons

Superintendent Julia Hunt Gibbons explaining a program to a student at an event where real people talked to real people.

“Attending this event will provide students with an opportunity to explore career areas that interest them and engage in meaningful conversations with program leaders,” says Julie Hunt Gibbons, Superintendent of Education with the Halton District School Board. “The aim is to create an awareness of the wide range of pathway planning opportunities for students in Halton high schools.”

The event keynote speaker will be entrepreneur/youth coach Sam Demma. Through his message, he will empower students to explore the many pathways opportunities HDSB has to offer and will emphasize the importance of pathway planning and incorporating a philosophy of the power of ‘small consistent actions’.

The keynote speaker will be followed by approximately 60 breakout rooms where students will interact with the HDSB teacher leads of the programs available. There will be three breakout sessions lasting 20 minutes each. The lead of each program will explain the opportunities and advantages of the special programs and allow time for student questions.

The HDSB offers more than 60 Specialist High Skills Major programs (SHSM), the concentrated Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and other specialty programs in high schools throughout Halton.

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Reduced rental rates for recreation service providers to continue into 2021

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 27th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

The City of Burlington’s rental fees for those not for profit organizations and small businesses who use recreation facilities to run programs for the community will continue to see a reduced rental fee that will gradually increase to regular rates later in 2021.

This support is provided to assist organizations impacted by the COVID pandemic and the restrictions imposed on these organizations in order to reduce the spread of the virus.

This approach lowers financial relief as we head into pandemic recovery.

This past August, Burlington City Council approved a 25 per cent fee reduction for the remainder of 2020.

Coach DAve 2

Recreational and sports programs are offered to parents who want something extra for their children. Not for profit organizations rent city space to offer the programs. Covid disrupted the programs – city came up with a support program.

Burlington has a strong history of partnership with both not-for-profit organizations and small, for-profit businesses to provide recreation and sport opportunities for residents. These groups have been adversely affected by the restrictions for COVID-19, such as the requirement to cap the number of participants permitted in a facility at a given time, which reduces revenue, as well as the need for special protective equipment, extra cleaning and screening protocols, and training for staff, all of which increase expenses.

Coach DAve MAgic word

Coach Dave who delegated for the sector had a strong history with at least two Council members: Rory Nisan who was developed as a pretty good wrestler by Coach Dave and Councillor Kearns who had children in a Coach Dave program.

Continuing rental rate reduction support into 2021 will help as many of these groups as possible survive this disruption, maintaining “something to come back to” post-pandemic. Groups will be encouraged to pass savings along to residents, lowering or maintaining the cost of participation for families and individuals. Priority is already given in the space allocation process to groups with a fee assistance program; this will continue with the goal of maximizing safe, accessible, and affordable participation in recreation and sport.

Fee Schedule
• 20 per cent rental fee reduction in the first quarter
• 15 per cent reduction in the second quarter
• 10 per cent reduction in the third quarter
• Return to pre-COVID-19 rates in the fourth quarter of 2021

User groups will be contacted by the City staff.

Recreation Fee Assistance Program
Recreation is for all, regardless of financial situation. Recreation Fee Assistance is funding made available to resident individuals or families who need help to pay for City of Burlington recreation programs.

For more information or to apply, visit burlington.ca/feeassistance. You can also leave a confidential voicemail message at 905-335-7738, ext. 8501 and our staff will return your call to assist you.

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Repairing your appliances - if you don't know how there are people who do

News 100 blueBy Irana Feederman

November 26th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

All appliances we use in our daily life may stop their normal functioning. They can face different issues, your refrigerator may have continuous leakage problems, strange noise, low cooling, and many other problems. The washer can face slow draining, clothes ripping, door lock, and smell problems. In the same way, your other appliances may have similar issues.

How to repair your appliances?
You need appliance repair services for removing obstacles to your appliances. After repairing your durable goods, they can work properly as before, so it is a better option than changing and buying new ones.

You can take advantage of the LG repair service in Toronto for the best and satisfactory repairing services. It is the simplest, easy, light budget, and more reliable method for the recovery of your appliances. Your devices can get a new life again as it works with 100 % accuracy after repairing.

Why dryer makes noise?
Dryer noise indicates significant problems in your dryer. You need to repair it as soon as possible in order to avoid other major problems. The possible reasons for this terrible noise are the following:

Faulty Drive Belt:
In both gas and electric dryers drive belt used for the rotation of the drum. With the usage, it dries out and makes noise when the drum turns.

Blower Wheel:
The blower wheel used to pull out air from the heating chamber, may become faulty due to the insertion of small pieces of clothes in the filter which lies in the blower wheel, then the blower wheel cause noise.

drum bearings

Most household equipmenrt can be repaired.

Drum Bearing:
Bearing used to support the back of the drum, when bearing becomes tired due to usage and passage of time, it produces irritating noise.

Drive Motor:
The Drive motor used to turn the blower and drum. The problems with the drive motor may cause bad noise.

Why LED TV is not showing display?

Sometimes your LED TV shows a black screen or no display even power is turned on, it may happen due to the following reasons:

Failure in the power supply board:
It may happen due to failure in the power supply board. The connections, capacitors, and other parts of the circuit may have problems, so it shows a blank screen.

Faulty Cables:
The connectors of cables may have failed or cables themselves having issues like breakage, so this problem occurs.

LED repair

LED screens need maintenance – big ones and small ones.

Defective LED:
It is possible LED’s or strip of LED’s are not working properly, and they are responsible for the backlight. If they are not providing backlight then there will be no display on the screen.

What are the general reasons behind Appliances Failure?
The general reasons behind the appliance’s failure are excessive usage, operating in high temperature, improper electric supply, and moisture. Every appliance has its own recommended environment in which it can work properly, when we don’t use appliances according to suggested settings it stops working in a short time.

You daily face these problems with your appliances, and you can repair them on your own if they are little and understandable, otherwise, you need appliance repair services.

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Medical Officer of Health uses graphs to tell a sad story - we did this to ourselves.

News 100 redBy Pepper Parr

November 27the 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Region of Halton held a very lengthy meeting yesterday.

One of the reports they responded to was an update from Dr. Hamidah Meghani who produced a number of charts that were on the mind boggling level.

Have a look:

timeline

Dr. Meghani set out a time line showing her audience what we have been through.

graph

The slope of the graph in October and November was very troubling for the medical community. They found that the public was not listening to the steps they had to take – daily.

where they got it

Where were people getting the infections? Dr. Meghani told her audience that the virus was not being passed around at the school level. Students were bringing it to the schools from their homes.

work place breakout

There were a number of workplace outbreaks in Halton. One impacted people who lived in four different Public Health jurisdictions. Tracing at that level of complexity proved to be a major challenge.

cumulative deaths

There is something so very stark about this graph. Deaths were close to flat from May to October – then they sky-rocked. Those deaths were due to a society that would not exercise the personal discipline needed by everyone during a crisis.

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Webinar on the quarry expansion next week; sponsored by environmental group

News 100 greenBy Staff

November 26th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Lots of squabbling over the amount of pure public engagement over the application that has been made for a license to expand the Nelson Aggregate quarry in rural Burlington.

Quarry aerial

Red lines indicate the area the quarry wants to expand into.

Spend your lunch hour munching (on mute ) and learning everything you ever wanted to know about Nelson Aggregate’s two-pit plan for Burlington’s Mt. Nemo.

It’s being hosted by the Halton Environmental Network as part of their famous “Lunch & Learn” series.

There will be a Q&A after the presentation, so if you have any questions you can ask them then.

RSVP below. It’s free, too.

Register for the Webinar

Related news story:

Region blasts Ministry over failure to hold meetings.

 

Region

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How is Burlington taking to on-line gambling ?

sportsgold 100x100By Cosmin Mesenschi

November 26th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Betting games have always been a piece of Canada since the beginning of her history.

The Great White North is on the top ten list of countries with the most gamblers, and the province of Ontario is a globally known casino destination for land-based clubs.

Ontario is the area with the most local gamblers in the country and has the highest revenue. Today, the internet betting framework in Canada is seen by many as the casino and gambling industry’s future.

PAID Cosmin

Online Canadian gambling services offer many benefits for the residents of Burlington in today’s social and political climate.

Internet betting amongst Burlington residents has become popular because of its convenience. These online Canadian gambling services offer many benefits for the residents of Burlington in today’s social and political climate. You can check out some of the available and reputable Canadian casinos here.

The Locals are Logging On
More and more Burlington residents turn to online gambling as a simple way to have fun at home.

Demographic research of online gambling in Canada states that four out of five gamblers are male. Still, more female users are logging onto online gambling services on their smartphones. The people most likely to gamble or those enrolled in full-time education and under 35.

Of all the online games and services, slot and blackjack games get the most visits. Three-quarters of these players are playing virtualized versions of classic fruit slot machines; some of them are winning big prizes.

Now that land-based casino games are transitioning to online availability, it’s never been more comfortable to gamble. Especially with the relaxed online regulations, more Burlington locals can now access this pastime.

A Safe Way to Have Fun

In Burlington, players love to engage in online games in a safe, secure way to relax and play. In the past year, revenue for online casinos in Canada has skyrocketed to upwards to $31 million a year.

The advancements in mobile, virtual, and augmented reality create a real casino-like experience. It showcases modern ways to play casino classics, pushing for online gambling’s projected growth in Canada.

This new technology entices veteran players and attracts those new to the gambling world. Some of the most popular casino software providers in this country are Microgaming, NetEnt, Playtech, and Real Time Gaming.

Potential Income in Uncertain Times

There have been life-changing amounts of money that have been won by Canadian online casino players. A Burlington resident won the $250,000 Lottario jackpot in September of this year. An even bigger win of $20 million was on the MegaMoolah progressive slot in 2019, and a similar success on that same Canadian slot occurred only one year earlier.
Canada’s Soft Gambling Regulations

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation is the public authority that manages all lottery, gambling, and circuit activities in Ontario. The OLGC has created more relaxed laws towards the online casino industry than others, even the United States. In 2015, they dispatched their casino website. It is the leading site of the area, but the only one that is regulated.

Many foreign online casinos are accessible in Burlington. All local betting game play is legal through these unregulated sites. Canadians can access these because the OLGC has not created a licensing structure for these outside businesses to register and become licensed in Canada.

Many Reasons to Play

There are many legitimate reasons why Burlington residents are logging on to casino sites, and it isn’t just because of the Canadian ancestry or the adrenaline pumping allure. The available technology, abundant opportunities to win big, and relaxed local casino laws make way for a vast online gambling presence in Burlington that shows no signs of slowing down.

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A treat - something to enjoy on one of those evenings you would be out during the Festive Season

News 100 redBy Staff

November 26th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Get your Fall Party in a Box before they’re gone!

Brant fall party box

A treat – something to enjoy on one of those evenings you would be out during the Festive Season

We could all use something to celebrate and our Fall Party in a Box has everything you need for a cozy night at home or as a special holiday gift for friends and family.

Each curated party box contains locally sourced luxury items including a variety of gourmet items and a custom live-edge charcuterie board, VQA wine, premium chocolates and much more!

Special thank you to our Presenting Sponsor, TD Bank.

Boxes are going fast so order today!  More info on the order link below

Order Now!

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Public school board invites three year old's to the virtual classroom world

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 26th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Is this a sign of the way education is going to be delivered in the decades ahead?

The Halton District School Board (HDSB) has put out a call to all three year olds offering them an opportunity to learn about Kindergarten through a virtual experience.

Families are invited to learn about starting Kindergarten and sign up to receive a welcome package.

Starting school is a big step for children and parents/guardians, and the Halton District School Board wants to make that transition as smooth as possible said the HDSB in a statement released yesterday.

Students at Lincoln Centennial public school. Ontario school boards are struggling to find low-cost options to school additions to accommodate full-day kindergarten. Some options may include bussing kids. Reading are Heyley Ta and Zeynep Coskan-Johnson. Feb 21 2013. Bob TYmczyszyn/St. Catharines Standard/QMI AGENCY

Is this model of early education about to disappear ?

This fall, the HDSB is welcoming future students and their families to a virtual Kindergarten experience at kindergarten.hdsb.ca to learn more about making the first school experience a happy one.

Due to current public health restrictions, traditional in-person Kindergarten Open Houses are not possible this year. Instead, the HDSB has created a virtual experience for three-year olds and their families.

At kindergarten.hdsb.ca, three-year olds can explore a Kindergarten classroom to see what their future classroom might look like next September. There are videos to watch, pictures to view and fun activities for kids. Parents/guardians can learn about the Kindergarten program at the HDSB, play-based learning, community resources in Halton and before-and-after school care. Families can also sign-up to receive a welcome package from the HDSB including a free children’s book.

screen-time-and-students-banner

Is this the classroom of the future?

Registration for Kindergarten begins in January 2021 and will be by appointment only (in-person and/or virtual) through the school your child will attend. Further information will be shared in the new year. To begin Kindergarten in September 2021, children must be four years old by Dec. 31, 2021 for Junior Kindergarten (Year 1) and must be five years old by Dec. 31, 2021 for Senior Kindergarten (Year 2).

Come September of 2021 the HDSB will have a new Director of Education as well. Stuart Miller advised the Board of Trustees recently that he would be retiring in August.

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Councillor and Mayor push Ministry to hold public meeting on the Quarry license application

News 100 greenBy Pepper Parr

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan and Mayor Marianne Meed Ward moved a Motion at the Regional Council meeting today taking exception to the way the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) were dragging their feet on ensuring acceptable public engagement.

Meed Ward style

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward

Rory Nisan

Ward 3 Councillor Rory Nisan

The Motion was adopted unanimously.

The outcome will be a letter to the MMNRF asking that they do their job and ensure that there is access to information about the current application in a transparent and timely manner.

The legislation requires an applicant for a licence to comply with the prescribed notification and consultation procedures.

Nelson aggregates report that they have:

conducted more than 50 hours of Public Information sessions.

The mayor and councillor have conducted two other public information sessions.

Right now for three weeks, or 120 hours, Nelson Aggregates is offering any member of the public a time to speak one-on-one with our experts to address any questions or concerns they have.

And we will post the questions and answers online to transparently encourage accessible, public discussion of the issues

That is 170 hours of public consultation and information sessions. And that is way above and beyond the four hours or so that is required.

Councillor Nisan said the one-on-one phone calls that were taking place were found to be intimidating by some people.

The Motion, which is a little on the wordy side, sets out what the ward Councillor and the Mayor want the public to understand.

There is a deadline of December 14th for public comments.

Quarry map

Quarry lands and where they want to expand.

WHEREAS the MNRF issues licences for pits and quarries in the Province of Ontario;

AND WHEREAS the Aggregate Resources Act R.S.O. 1990 is the primary legislation for the management of the aggregate resources in Ontario, the control and regulation of aggregate operations; the rehabilitation of land from which aggregate has been excavated, and the minimization of adverse impacts on the environment in respect of aggregate operations in the Province of Ontario;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry is responsible for the administration of the Aggregate Resources Act;

AND WHEREAS Nelson Aggregate Co. owns and operates the Burlington Quarry (ARA Licence #5499) under a Class A licence for unlimited dolostone extraction, below water, in a 202.5 hectare licenced area at 2433 No. 2 Side Road in Parts of Lots 1 and 2, Concession 2 and 3 in the City of Burlington;

AND WHEREAS there has been significant public concern over Nelson Aggregate Co.’s 2004, 2006 and 2008 applications to expand the Burlington Quarry including impacts to private water wells, the natural environment, noise and air quality, blasting, traffic, rehabilitation, cumulative effects of the existing and proposed quarry operation, and the impact on the Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO Biosphere reserve;

AND WHEREAS in May 2020 Nelson Aggregate Co. applied to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry for a Category 2 (below water), Class A licence, to the Niagara Escarpment Commission for a Niagara Escarpment Plan Amendment and Niagara Escarpment Plan Development Permit, to Halton Region for a Regional Official Plan Amendment, and to the City of Burlington for a Local Official Plan Amendment to expand the existing operation by 78.4 hectares with a 2,000,000 tonne extraction limit per annum to the west and south;

AND WHEREAS there is a widespread public desire to have access to information about the current application in a transparent and timely manner given the significance of potential impacts to private water wells, the natural environment, noise and air quality, blasting, traffic, rehabilitation, cumulative effects of the existing and proposed quarry operation, and the impact on the Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO Biosphere reserve;

AND WHEREAS Section 11(1) of the Aggregate Resources Act provides that the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry shall require an applicant for a licence to comply with the prescribed notification and consultation procedures;

AND WHEREAS the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry’s prescribed standards for consultation require applicants to host a presentation to the public, in the locality of the application, outlining all details of the proposal (information session, open house, community meeting, etc.) In the past, the long-standing practice has been to hold these sessions in person;

AND WHEREAS the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry issued a bulletin in August 2020 suggesting that applicants for new aggregate licences are now permitted to post information to a public website and schedule individual appointments with members of the public in place of a public information session;

Quarry time line

License application time line

AND WHEREAS, due to COVID-19 restrictions, prescribed time periods under the Aggregate Resources Act were suspended between March 16th, 2020 and September 11th, 2020 and have resumed as of September 12th, 2020 to include the 45-day notification and consultation period for aggregate applicants to provide public notice, hold information sessions for licences and provide the public, agencies and other stakeholders an opportunity to submit written notice of objections/concerns;

AND WHEREAS Nelson Aggregate Co., through their Notice in the Burlington Post dated October 29, 2020, and associated mailings sent to agencies and nearby residents, have launched the 45-day review period under the Aggregate Resources Act for individuals to provide their objections and reasons for objecting, with a deadline for submissions of December 14, 2020;

AND WHEREAS Nelson Aggregate Co., through that Notice, indicated that a public information session will not be held due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and instead indicated that information will be posted to its website and Nelson is willing to

organize calls between members of the public and its consultants to discuss details and answer questions related to the application;

AND WHEREAS the bulletin issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in August 2020 is uncharacteristically vague and represents a departure from longstanding, observed protocol that directs proponents to host open public meetings as part of due process and does not recognize the prevalent availability of tools and resources to enable effective virtual public meetings during the pandemic;

AND WHEREAS Halton Regional Council does not believe that Nelson Aggregate Co.’s approach informing the public of its 2020 Burlington Quarry application meets long established and practised protocol as prescribed by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry representing minimum standards for effectively engaging communities that are potentially impacted by applications under the Aggregate Resource Act;

AND WHEREAS precautions around COVID-19 have resulted in a number of changes to the way all levels of government operate and engage with the public, including moving Council meetings, public engagement and consultation into online formats;

AND WHEREAS Halton Regional Council and staff continue to stress the importance of public engagement even during the COVID-19 pandemic and, much like the significant majority of municipalities and public agencies across the Province, are currently using virtual formats for public information sessions and statutory public meetings required by the Planning Act;

AND WHEREAS Halton Region is home to 23 licensed aggregate sites, with two active aggregate applications and one impending aggregate application, it is important to ensure that the prescribed notification and public consultation process occurs in an open and transparent manner allowing for live and active verbal exchanges between parties;

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT Halton Region is committed to a well- functioning ARA review and approval process and encourages the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, in the strongest of terms, to require aggregate applicants in Halton Region to hold online public information sessions as prescribed by the Aggregate Resources Act for new and/or expansion applications, including that of Nelson Aggregate Co.’s for its applications to expand the Burlington Quarry;

AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT Halton Region staff be directed to contact Nelson Aggregate Co. to schedule and support the delivery of a virtual public information session;

AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Regional Chair write a letter outlining the above to the Premier of Ontario, the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry; the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing; and provide a copy to Association of Municipalites of Ontario, Halton’s MPPs; for their information and to the City of Burlington, the Town of Halton Hills, the Town of Milton and the Town of Oakville; and Conservation Halton for their endorsement.

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Neighbourhood rink program revised - applications close December 2nd

sportsgold 100x100By Pepper Parr

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There was ice on the pond this morning – not thick enough to hold anyone up – but winter is here and that means skating and shinny hockey.

outdoor rink - flooding

City is providing boards and tarps this year

The city has a program to support outdoor neighbourhood ice rinks available now; Burlington Rotary Centennial Pond to open in December.

The City of Burlington is launching the annual Neighbourhood Rink Program where neighbourhoods maintain outdoor community ice rinks at their local park this winter. Applications for the Neighbourhood Rink program due by Dec. 2, 2020.

Modifications have been made to the program to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

The City of Burlington will work with your group to support your neighbourhood rink by:

* Providing, installing and leveling of 15 cm high rink boards (approximate size of the rink is 11x24m)
* Providing a tarp and hoses
* Providing a training manual including tips on ice maintenance

Applicants who apply will be responsible for:

* Organizing a working group of at least six community champions to help maintain the rink
* Providing water and filling and maintaining the rink
* Arranging to have shovels available so that snow can be cleared from the rink
* Ensuring that physical distancing is maintained at three metres unless the other skater(s) are from your household, and City of Burlington signage stays intact

Neighbourhood rinks are open to all community members to skate for free. Anyone using the rinks must ensure proper physical distancing, follow the limit on gatherings to ensure three-meter distancing from those not within your household, keep the number of skaters to 25 or less and avoid overcrowding the rink.

For more information, visit 

 

 

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There is a Magic Trail that winds its way through the city - Santa is said to be travelling that trail early in December

News 100 redBy Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

To bring happiness and joy to the neighbourhoods of Burlington this holiday season, the City of Burlington is launching Santa’s Holiday Magic Trail (SHMT) and asking you to join virtually for Story Time with Santa.

Santa’s Holiday Magic Trail
Santa’s Holiday Magic Trail is an innovative alternative to the traditional Santa Claus Parade. Due to COVID-19, the traditional Santa Claus Parade will not happen this year as the City continues to follow public health direction and the need to maintain physical distancing and avoid crowding.

Ho Ho man himself Santa

No reindeer this year – an antique fire truck and with the Ho, Ho, Ho man ringing a bell

Santa’s Holiday Magic Trail will feature Santa Claus riding on an antique fire truck with a police escort through different Burlington neighbourhoods each weekend in December. To keep residents safe, the truck will not make stops and residents are asked to view Santa from within their own household or if outdoors, follow public health direction and maintain two metres physical distancing from anyone not from your household.

Schedule
Each day, Santa will be moving throughout the neighbourhoods from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting.

Dec. 5: Rural Burlington, Tyandaga, Brant Hills and Mountainside

Dec. 6: Headon Forest, Palmer, Tansley and Millcroft

Dec. 12: Alton Village, the Orchard, Corporate, Pinedale and Elizabeth Gardens

Dec. 13: Longmoor, Shoreacres, Roseland and Dynes

Dec. 19: Aldershot, Central and Plains

Dec. 20: Make-up inclement weather date, if needed

For resident safety, the exact route of the SHMT cannot be posted in order to avoid potential gatherings along sidewalks awaiting his arrival. Santa will safely move through neighbourhoods and residents are asked to avoid gathering. The fire truck and police escort will sound their sirens occasionally.

Anyone who sees Santa can use the hashtag #SpotSantaBurlON to notify neighbours of his location and spread the magic.
Santa will not be stopping to accept letters, milk or cookies or posing for photos. Please use caution and stay safe when near the road.

Information is also posted on burlington.ca/parade.

Story Time with Santa
Beginning Dec. 19, at 6 p.m., Santa will bring greetings to Burlington residents and read “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” as well as tell stories of the north pole, his reindeer and the nice list. The video will be posted on burlington.ca/parade and will be available for viewing anytime until Dec. 31.

Our Mayor sees a “silver lining” in the pandemic we are under.   “The silver lining throughout this year has been finding new and creative ways to do things and celebrate holidays from how we’ve traditionally done it before. I want to thank our Recreation Services staff for coming up with Holiday Magic Trail and Storytime with Santa, and putting it together to help our community usher in the Christmas spirit to our Burlington.”

www.burlington.ca/parade is the link you want to catch all this fun.

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Burlington Mayor Asks Residents to Stay in their Regions During Lockdown, Support Local Businesses Through Online Shopping & Curbside Pickup

News 100 redBy Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward is asking the people of Burlington to stay within the Region of Halton during the lockdown period that applies to people in Peel and Toronto.

There may well be people in Peel and Toronto who will want to come to Halton municipalities to shop.

Mayor Meed Ward

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward

I have received many recent requests from residents to take action on people travelling from lockdown areas into Burlington to patronize our shops and services.

In these challenging times, I stand with other mayors across Ontario, including in the Region of Halton, Mayor Rick Bonnette of Halton Hills, in asking residents to stay in their own communities for the time being.

In October 2020, Burlington MPP Jane McKenna and I issued a statement asking residents to stay in their communities and that message is still relevant today.

Your local businesses need you now, more than ever. Consider shopping online, curbside pickup and purchasing gift cards to give those businesses hope and support heading into the new year.

The City of Burlington has no jurisdiction to prevent travel between regions. We do recognize that some people will need to travel for essential reasons, such as work, school, or medical or other appointments. We are asking everyone to limit non-essential trips outside your local region.

We do know some businesses have already taken voluntary steps to reduce visits between regions. Some gyms, for example, have suspended membership travel privileges; some restaurants have asked for identification and will only seat members of the same household together.

We thank them for these voluntary, preventative measures that are aimed not only at doing their part to limit the spread of COVID-19 across regions, but also to protect their own staff and other customers.

We encourage people to check with your intended destination by phone or through their website before visiting so that you are well-informed of their health precautions and protocols ahead of time.

We know many of our residents who work in front-line retail or other services, often at minimum wage, are concerned about their own health and safety with an influx of potential customers from lockdown areas with much higher rates of COVID-19 infection and spread. We understand these concerns and ask everyone to consider these workers and their families before travelling to regions outside their own.

We continue to ask our Burlington residents to limit your own trips to essential outings only and to limit contact with anyone you don’t live with. To individuals in our city living alone, we echo the Province’s message of choosing one household to be in contact with.

We need to slow the spread of COVID-19 and can do this together by staying home and staying local.

 

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2020 Miracle on Main Street and Cram-a-Cruiser Events are on - dates and times set out below

News 100 yellowBy Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

When the circumstances change you pivot and go in whatever direction you have to go to get to where you want to be.

The Halton Regional Police have done just that and tell us that “it’s that time of year again when families begin to think about the upcoming holiday season. There are many families within the Halton Region that are less fortunate and struggle to provide their children with an enjoyable Christmas, and some who are simply not able to buy their children a toy. This year we believe the struggle could be even greater for more families.”

Miracle onmainThe Halton Regional Police Service and the Tiger Jeet Singh Foundation are commencing the annual Miracle on Main Street (formerly Toys for Tots) Christmas donation drive. This is the third year of the merger between the two entities to collect and distribute funds and toys to families in need throughout the Halton Region. The merger has allowed the organizations to enhance the annual donation drives and to work collaboratively to help more families in need than ever before. Since 1999 the Halton Regional Police Service have supported families through Toys for Tots and Miracle on Main Street campaigns. All donations collected are distributed to Halton schools, community agencies and families!

The Tiger Jeet Singh Foundation is a Milton-based charity started by wrestling legends, humanitarians and philanthropists; Tiger Jeet Singh and his son Tiger Ali Singh. For the last eleven years, the Tiger Jeet Singh Foundation has organized their “Miracle on Main Street” event which has raised millions of dollars through donations and sponsorships for children and families in need who live in our Region.

Cram a cruiser

Cramming that Cruiser will be a little different this year.

To keep everyone safe, we have had to modify our efforts this year. We will not be accepting toy donations at our Halton Regional Police Service facilities. We are encouraging everyone to donate gift cards and cash in lieu of the usual unwrapped new toys.

Donations can be made online through www.MiracleOnMain.ca , or by visiting one of our scheduled events detailed below. 100% of the donations go back into the Halton community!

Our annual “Cram-a-Cruiser” donation events will proceed, Pandemic restrictions permitting, and following safe protocols.

Dates/times and locations below:

November 28, 10am-2pm at JR Toy Company – 2-4265 Fairview St, Burlington
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 777 Guelph Line, Burlington
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 2070 Appleby Line, Burlington
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 1100 Kerr St, Oakville
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 251 Hyde Park Gate, Oakville
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 400 Dundas St East, Oakville
December 5, 10am-2pm at Canadian Tire – 1210 Steeles Ave East, Milton

We’ll also be hosting a weekly, one day, donation drop off at the Halton Children’s Safety Village, located at 1151 Bronte Rd Oakville. Cash and toy donations are welcome! Look for the holiday lights. We ask that anyone attending to please follow the direction of officers on sight and to remain in your vehicles. Drop off dates and times are:

Thursday November 26, 5pm-9pm
Wednesday December 2, 5pm-9pm
Wednesday December 9, 5pm-9pm

For further information, or if you are interested in partnering with us to collect or donate gift cards, you can contact us by emailing MiracleonMain@haltonpolice.ca. You can also contact the Tiger Jeet Singh Foundation at info@tigerjeetsinghfoundation.com, or visit their website at www.tigerjeetsinghfoundation.com for further information.

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Region talks about burying the towers while Hydro does expensive maintenance work.

hydro work - insulator repair

Insulators being replaced on hydro towers.

News 100 greenBy Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

An observant Gazette reader recalled story we did on the idea that was floated at a Regional council meeting about the hydro towers along the Beachway might be buried.

While out for a walk our reader took the photograph that is shown and added the comment that: ”Can’t see these coming down anytime soon…as new glass insulators are currently being installed.”

She just might be right.

Related news story:

Will those Hydro towers ever disappear

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First Annual Diwali Food Drive

News 100 redBy Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

DiwaliFoodDrive

Donations were collected from HRPS members (sworn and civilian) throughout the region.

The Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) has completed its first annual Diwali Food Drive.

The event was organized by the HRPS South Asian Internal Support Network and donations were collected from HRPS members (sworn and civilian) throughout the region between November 2 and November 12, 2020.

Kudo’s to the police for taking the initiative to do something to meet the needs of a community that isn’t as fully integrated as it could be.

The food collected was donated to local food banks in Milton, Halton Hills, Oakville and Burlington (see attached photo).

The HRPS looks forward to turning the Diwali Food Drive into an annual HRPS tradition.

The HRPS would also encourage residents to make donations to local food banks throughout the year as they are able to.

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Second Virtual Regional Official Plan Review to take place this evening.

eventsgreen 100x100By Staff

November 25th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The process that is going to result in the removal of a designation that skewered the kind of development attracted to the downtown core and that will result in a change in the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre continues this evening as a virtual public meeting.

A meeting with the same material took place on the 19th during the day.  The event this evening is at 7:00 pm – runs for two hours and is well worth your while if you want to understand how changes get made in the city and the Region.

Aerial COB - frm Region

Where is the growth going to take place?

The Burlington MTSA and Urban Growth Centre (UGC) issues are the focus of the meeting which are part of the  Regional Official Plan Review.

Whatever decision gets made on the MTSA and UGC from a Burlington perspective will be included in the next version of the Official Plan that is released.

Several questions put forward by the Regional planners drive these virtual meetings:

Did we hear you?

Is this what you are saying?

This listening exercise is an ongoing process.

Questions from the public are a large part of the meeting.  During the first session the questions were detailed and the answers given were robust.

Date: Wednesday, November 25, 2020
Time: 7 p.m.
Call 1-855-703-8985 (Toll Free) or 647-374-4685 or 647-558-0588 or join via Zoom Meeting ID: 980 8592 6459 | Passcode: 930488

Related news story:

First virtual meeting on the Regional Official Plan review – an event of critical importance to Burlington

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The impact Covid19 has had on the Joseph Hospital

News 100 yellowBy Staff

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

COVID has changed everything.

Brant Join the JoyIf you think the changes it has made in your life – think for a moment about the changes it has made in the medical community.
The Joseph Brant Hospital talks about the impact the virus has had on their operations:

COVID-19 has changed our lives in immeasurable ways. From physical distancing to face coverings and social bubbles to self-isolation it has been a year unlike any other.

And despite it all, our collective appreciation for your support of Joseph Brant Hospital has been consistent through it all.

Brant impact report

We are pleased to share the impact your support has had in our COVID-19 Impact Report.

 

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Gift of Giving Back finds a way to do what is needed - they learned to pivot and innovate

News 100 blueBy Pepper Parr

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Gift of Giving Back – remember those people – the ones who worked with high school students and families to gather tonnes of foods – they filled school gymnasiums year after year – then COVID knocked the wheels off the work they do.

Gift of Giving back logo - 10thWell – COVID wasn’t going to stop this crowd – they announced today a Help Us Feed Kids: Holiday Food Drive that will run from December 3rd to December 20th.

Giving back 2018

The Barracudas – check in and making sure the weight of the food is put on the scoreboard.

They are excited about how they figured out a way to meet what is these days a very different situation.

They are inviting our young Community Champions to help them safely collect non-perishable food items and bring them to the Burlington Centre where they will host a Food Drive Headquarters located by the Food Court.

They are also providing an opportunity for high school students to collect volunteer hours. There is more to this 2020 COVID initiative – additional announcements in the coming days.

Giving back - boys with cans

The van was packed – can they do this in 2020?

The Gift of Giving Back Website

This page provides detailed information about the Holiday Food Drive as well as how high school students can collect volunteer hours.

While this pandemic has closed the Gift of Giving Back doors it has not prevented them from hosting their usual “November High School Gym Extravaganza”, it will not prevent them from continuing to empower our youth to compassionately give back. “We truly appreciate your support.”

 

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Burlington Food Bank finds that their stats paint a disturbing picture.

News 100 blueBy Staff

November 24th, 2020

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Food Bank, which by the way doesn’t get a dime from the city or as much as a nickel from the Regional government which handles social issues, has run into a situation that is new for them.

“We’ve NEVER had to purchase food at this time of year before and now it’s just another new norm,” said Scot Cameron.

The local food drives make a difference.

Bailey Food Bank March 31-20

Upwards of 30 households a day get a food delivery from the Food Bank

“Just looking at our recent stats, and comparing this year’s food donations to the last couple of years. We felt that since we have missed out on all of the annual (larger) food drives that our numbers must be much lower however, in fact, we’ve realized even more donations this year than ever before.

“We just didn’t see it because our supplies have been going out just as fast as we get them in the door. In the past we would see neatly placed and stocked up shelves ready to go around this time of year. And of course we are helping a greater number of people now.

“All of the smaller, local drives have had an immense effect on what we are doing here. You really are making a difference when families need it most. Even if you are just dropping off a bag at your local grocery store or fire hall, it makes a huge difference right now.

“If you are in need or know of someone who could use our help PLEASE have them email us at info@burlingtonfoodbank.ca or call 905-637-2273 to make arrangements to have food dropped at their door or make arrangements to pick it up through our curb-side pickup option. If you live in Burlington, we are here to help. Don’t struggle – give us a call.

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