Technology from inventive minds helps RBG collect donations while you take a walk in the park

By Staff

July 19th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Like many not-for-profits, Burlington’s Royal Botanical Gardens saw a slump in donations during the pandemic. With their main garden areas and indoor spaces restricted they were forced to close due to COVID-19.

The tap to give technology helps RBG get through a slow period for donations.

The trails systems saw a significant increase in foot traffic, which is why they are there.

What RBG wasn’t able to do was solicit donations. They had no means of requesting donations from hikers and walkers.

Then Moneris and a start up brought out their idea.

You may not know Moneris – but they know you. In many places where you use your plastic to pay for something the transaction could be going through a Moneris terminal.

Moneris Canada and the start up, tiptap, helped to install a touchless solar powered device at the entrance of one of their trails.

The device allowed visitors to donate by simply tapping their credit or debit card before starting their walk.

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Tug boat chug chugs from Halifax to Hamilton where it will be used for

By Staff

July 18th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Alan Harrington has been tracking the progress of the tugboat Theodore for weeks.

Theodore TOO entering Hamilton harbour

It was a long arduous trip with numerous stops along to way – from Halifax to its new home in Hamilton where it will be  refitted to do environmental work.

It was bought by McKeil a Burlington marine  company.

The boat has a crew of four.

Harrington made sure he was at the canal to capture the picture of the tug entering Hamilton harbour with a police marine unit escort.

It sailed alone from Halifax a few weeks ago and entered the canal with escorts from the police marine unit and a ship from the Coat Guard.

 

 

 

 

 

AH

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Quarry expansion opponents to gather at the front gates next week

By Pepper Parr

July 17th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

An upgrade on the membership of the group that supports a quarry in rural Burlington.  We are advised that the membership has written more than 2000 letters of support.

For the community group opposing the expansion of the Nelson Quarry in rural Burlington the next step is to demonstrate and get their message out.

The application by Nelson Aggregates to expand their open pit mine is a long and slow moving process.

City Council has come out against the expansion, there is a small group for the expansion:  they don’t appear to have much in the way of community support.

On July 20th, CORE Burlington, PERL and Wellington Water Watchers will be outside the gates of Nelson Aggregates on the 2nd Side Road for  A Morning on Mt.Nemo.  They will be joined by Shane Philips of Wellington Water Watchers as he continues his ‘Ear to the Groundwater’ walking tour with a visit to the gates of Nelson Aggregate’s open-pit gravel mine, followed by a hike to the scenic brink of Burlington’s Niagara Escarpment.

Why: To raise awareness of the devastating effect open-pit gravel mines have on communities and the environment. Shane will connect the dots between the local and the global issues, and show how gravel mining helps fuel the climate crisis, and how Doug Ford’s agenda for new highways and more urban sprawl will devour our future.

When/Where: Tuesday, July 20th, 10am at 2462 No. Two Sideroad Burlington. Across from the gates of Nelson Aggregate’s 540-acre open pit mine on Burlington’s Escarpment: part of an UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve

A rendering of what Nelson Aggregates wants to do with the land when they have completed their mining of the available aggregate.

Order of Events:

10:00am – 10:30 Speakers, Mike Balkwill, Wellington Water Watchers; Janet Turpin Myers, CORE Burlington; Sarah Harmer, PERL; and Shane Phillips. As a special treat, Sarah will also perform ‘Escarpment Blues’.

10:30 – 11:45  Drive to Mt. Nemo Conservation Area (a few minutes away) for a hike to the brink of the Escarpment, and back again (about a 20 minute walk on an easy trail each way)

NOTE: The Conservation area requires advanced reservations to enter. We will reserve tickets for our group, which we expect will number about 20-30. If you plan to come along for the hike, please RSVP by responding to this email, no later than Monday, July 19th by 9am. This will help us to calculate how many reservations to make.

If you choose not to hike with us, please do join us for the first portion of the morning.

For more information contact: coreburlington@gmail.com

About CORE Burlington: www.coreburlington.com

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Federal provincial funds allow for the completion of several projects

By Staff

July 17th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Burlington is to receive provincial and federal funding from the Investing in Canada Infrastructure -Program (ICIP)  that will help fund four projects:

  • Elgin Street Promenade, Stage 4
  • Design and Construction of Palmer Trail
  • City Hall Customer Service Window Renovation
  • Roads, Parks and Forestry Operations Centre Renovation

In total, the City will receive $852,200 of funding, $681,760 from the Federal Government and $170,440 from the Provincial Government.

In August 2020 the Federal Government announced adjustments to the ICIP program to help provinces and territories and ultimately municipalities to deal with the financial pressures brought on by COVID-19. This new stream of funding is designed to deliver more infrastructure projects during the pandemic by increasing the types of eligible projects and accelerating approvals.

Funded Projects

When completed – the promenade will complete the trail from Brant Street to the Centennial Trail.

Elgin Street Promenade, Stage 4

    • – A 4m-wide fully accessible pedestrian and cycling trail located in the downtown core. Approximately 75 per cent of this trail is complete. This is the final phase of this four-part construction project and represents a vital link to connecting the downtown to an existing 8km trail that links to the broader community.
  • Palmer Trail – A 3m-wide fully accessible pedestrian and cycling trail located the heart of the City. Phase 1 was constructed in 2019. Approximately 50 per cent of this trail is complete. This proposed work is to complete the final phase, providing a key north-south link connecting neighborhoods to the larger trail system. The proposed width of these new trails will easily accommodate physical distancing between people passing each other and also allows for people to walk side by side.
  • City Hall Customer Service Window Renovation – The existing City Hall service counter requires a renovation to facilitate physical distancing and customer service requirements. Funding will be used towards the reconfiguration of the existing counter location to allow for customer privacy and an adequate queuing area away from the common traffic flow area.
  • Roads, Parks and Forestry (RPF) Operations Centre Renovation – A reconfiguration of the existing floor plan at the operations centre is necessary to accommodate RPF service requirements. The renovation will allow for supervisors and staff to work and collaborate efficiently and will also provide for additional physical distancing for staff and contractors through controlled queuing areas.
Related news story:
Final phase awaits funding

 

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City awards $25,200 for community projects, through the Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund

News 100 greenBy Staff

July 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The City of Burlington announced the names of the 2021 Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund recipients today.

A community investment of $25,200 will go towards three community projects, focused on enhancing infrastructure amenities within parks, gardens, buildings on public lands or on lands that are accessible to public.

2021 marks the fifth year the City has provided the program.

The projects funded for 2021 include:

Robin Bailey, Executive Director of the Food Bank talking to Adria Cehovin at the Urban Farm on Brant at Ghent.

Grow for Change Urban Farm Community Therapeutic Programs ($10,000)
This project will provide the community with access to a new temporary green space near Brant Street and Ghent Street, as well as therapeutic horticulture programming for adults and youth, to promote positive social and mental health.

The Orchard Community Garden Project ($10,000)
This brand-new community learning garden at the Trail Head Parkette (5401 Redstone St.), will include eight large garden boxes with fruits and vegetables and native pollinating flowers and plants. Food and plants harvested from the garden will be shared with the community and donated to the local food banks.

Community Garden in Roseland ($5,200)
This community garden in Roseland, at Port Nelson United Church, will be an accessible space for relaxation, reflection or a neighbourhood meeting. The space will feature numerous seating areas; herbs; perennials that support and encourage the pollinator population; and a ‘Peace Pole,’ an internationally recognized symbol of hopes and dreams that stands for peace on earth.

The successful projects have one year to complete their projects and must comply with the current public health regulations and provincial framework during development and implementation.

We never thought that the Roseland community needed public support for a community garden.

Our understanding was that the “farm” on Brant Street was being funded by the Molinaro Group who owned the land. When Ward 2 Councillor Lisa Kearns first announced the project she made no mention of public money being used.

Quick Facts:
The Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund was created in 2016 to inspire residents to champion community-led projects.

The goal of the fund is to improve neighbourhoods by creating a sense of belonging and community pride, while building meaningful connections.

Through the fund, Burlington residents are encouraged to submit community-led project plans that help make our city a better place to live and play.

• For 2021, the Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund focused on small projects that enhance infrastructure amenities within parks, gardens, buildings on public lands or on lands that are accessible to the public that meet the goal of the fund.

• All projects are to be planned, led and implemented by, and for the community in a public setting.

• Approved projects receive up to 50 per cent of the funding for the project from the City, to a maximum of $10,000. The community groups selected match this funding with an equal contribution made up through any combination of volunteer hours, donated services, donated materials and supplies or other funds raised, such as cash donations.

• For more information about the Neighbourhood Community Matching Fund, visit burlington.ca/matchingfund

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Lady of The Lakes getting frequent shampoos

News 100 greenBy Staff

July 15th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

We have a reader who I lives directly across from the Fountain at Spencer Smith Park.

She tells an interesting story about some “shampooing” that has taken place recently.

“A number of times last year the fountain was “shampooed” resulting in a foam party down at the park.

Foam for the lady

Lady of Lakes has been getting shampoos frequently. The Park maintenance people do not appear to be amused.

“I watched as City workers arrived each time to clean up the “mess”. It appeared that each time they needed to drain the fountain and clean it and refill it. It also appeared to take quite a few workers and quite a bit of time and effort to restart the fountain.

“A few days ago (I think last Saturday) I noticed during the day that the fountain was once again shampooed with foam bouncing about the park – quite a few people noticed it and were having a bit of fun chasing bubbles.

“They drained the fountain and have not performed any work to restart it – I’m guessing that perhaps they’ve had enough and have decided to leave it dry – but I’m not sure. It’s a shame but I do get it.”

“The photograph is one from last year’s shampooing from my front window view.”

The city might want to have one of the Park Ambassadors to be on the look out.

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The Babes deliver - again

graphic community 3By Staff

July 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Burlington Food Bank has a number of groups that are consistent supporters both in terms of help and sending dollars.

Earlier this week, Robin Bailey met with the Babes who presented him with a cheque for $240.

Daniel (Dover) Forsyth who took first prize in our regular season (Burlington Old Timers Hockey Club) BOHC hockey pool and asked BOHC to arrange for his winnings to be split between the Club’s favourite charities.

The Hospice and the Food Bank – a 50/50 split.

Bowser Babes

Shown are Suzanne, Robin, Tanje and Johanne from the BOWSER Babes. Someone got sloppy with the masking protocol.

Here’s hoping your broken ankle heals well Johanne! All fingers are crossed that vaccinations in Burlington increase so that we reach the numbers needed to be able to open up hockey for the Fall.

BOWSER is a big part of the community aspect of the club donating their time at the arenas during the hockey season. Thanks Babes and Thanks Dan!

Rumour has it the Club in return for the generous donation provided Dan with one get-out-of-the-penalty-box for free cards.

If you are in need or know of someone who could use our help, PLEASE have them email us at info@burlingtonfoodbank.ca or call 905-637-2273 to make arrangements to have food dropped at their door or make arrangements to pick it up through our curb-side pickup option. If you are a resident in Burlington, we are all here to help. Don’t struggle – give us a call.

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Brant Museum re-opens - features a Space Exhibit - starts July 20

eventsblue 100x100By Staff

July 14th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

Things are opening up

Brant Museum transformedThe Brant Museum announced today that they have a special feature on Space that will run from July 20 – September 18, 2021

Health in Space: Daring to Explore is a special exhibition developed by the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, one of three museums under Ingenium – Canada’s Museums of Science and Innovation, in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency.

Brant museum SpaceHealth in Space demystifies the health challenges — such as variable gravity, radiation, and isolation — that astronauts face while living and working in space. Through authentic artifacts and captivating interactive activities, this exhibition will engage visitors to better understand Canada’s role in advancing health research.

Discoveries in this field will be essential for the success of future deep-space expeditions, and may also help solve medical challenges on Earth.

Health in Space also includes video interviews with Canadian astronauts, which offer first-hand insight into their experiences. A special section within the exhibition highlights astronaut David Saint-Jacques’ recent mission, from his selection and training to the experiments conducted while aboard the ISS.

The hours of operation are Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 3:30pm, with COVID-19 protocols and procedures in place to allow the public to safely enjoy the galleries and exhibition.  Visitors can purchase tickets in advance online or in-person.

Museum hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 3:30pm with COVID-19 protocols and procedures in place to allow the public to safely enjoy the galleries and exhibition.

Entrance fee:  

$10 – adults

$8 – seniors

$6 – child

$30 – family (2 adults and up to 4 children)

Free – child under 3

Did you know…

Did you know that David Saint-Jacques was the most recent Canadian to go into space? Before he was an astronaut, he worked as a doctor in Puvirnituq, Nunavik, a remote community in Northern Quebec where he had to make work with minimal resources, just like in space!

Canadarm in space

Canadarm in use – serving the shuttle

Did you know that there is no “up” on the International Space Station (ISS)? The ISS is a small space, so all four walls are covered with workable equipment, therefore, whichever way an astronauts head is pointing is considered “up”. Also, switches have an very visible “On/Off” on them, since there is no “up” to show that it’s on.

Did you know that the Neuroarm was inspired by the same technology and principles at the Canadaarm? The NeuroArm allows surgeons to do very delicate operations while a patient is inside an Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine.

Did you know that Mercury is the smallest plant in our solar system? It is only about 40% larger than the Earth’s moon.

Did you know that astronauts go swimming to train for spacewalks? Floating in space is a lot like floating in water. Astronauts practice spacewalks underwater in a large swimming pool and train seven hours in the pool for every one hour they will spend on a spacewalk!

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Brave App – Another Tool to Prevent Fatal Drug Poisonings

graphic community 5By Staff

July 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

In the first six months of 2020, Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) officers responded to 168 suspected drug poisonings. One-third of those victims overdosed while alone, and nearly one in five did not survive.

In their media release the police explain why a new service has been put in place and the outcome they hope will be realized.

“We have been asked why we have taken a harm reduction approach to the overdose crisis in our community. The answer is simple: our goal is to prevent overdose deaths. Ultimately, a life saved today is an opportunity for recovery tomorrow.

“In an effort to ensure our community is aware of any and all resources available to them, we would like to introduce you to the Brave App.

“The Brave App is designed to connect people at risk of overdose with help they need: an ally they can talk to, a human supporter to help them stay safe, and digital monitoring technology to help them when they’re in danger. The app connects them with a community of overdose responders, and/or professional emergency first responders.

“The app is another tool that can be used to reduce the harms to individuals, families and communities from substance use, and is a complement to the services and resources that are available in Halton. The Brave App is not a substitute for calling 911.

“The Brave App was developed independently by Brave Technology Co-op, a multi-stakeholder cooperative in Vancouver B.C., and is not affiliated with the Halton Regional Police Service.

Brave app

Designed by people who use drugs.

How the App Works
1. A person at risk of overdose can use the app to connect with remote, peer support through a voice call.

2. If your supporter thinks you might be overdosing (through a pre-determined span of non-response), they will request access to the details of your private Rescue Plan.
This plan can include your location, access instructions, and an emergency contact to call instead of, or in addition to, calling 911.

3. You will then receive a 10-second countdown alert letting you know that information will be shared unless you indicate that you are ok by dismissing the alert.

4. If you are unable to dismiss the alert, then that information will be revealed to your supporter, who will only use it for the purpose of sending help.

Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act
If you use the app, and your Rescue Plan includes calling 911, our frontline officers and other first responders in Halton carry naloxone and we want to assist. As a reminder, the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act provides broad legal protections for anyone seeking emergency support during an overdose, including the person experiencing an overdose.

This means that individuals, including youth, will not be charged for offences such as simple possession for calling 9-1-1 in an emergency.

Privacy
People who request supervision remain anonymous and their location is only revealed if it is necessary to keep them safe. If there is no overdose, then their location is not shared. No account is needed to use the Brave App, and you don’t need to share your name, number, e-mail, or mailing address. No personal information is shared with responding Emergency Services unless it is part of the pre-determined response and only if the Rescue Plan is activated.

Learn More
The Brave App can be used by anyone with a mobile phone and internet access, and is available for download, for free, on both Apple and Android phones.

Click HERE to learn more about the Brave App

Photo credit: Sara Wylie, National Day of Action | February 21, 2017

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The screens will come alive on Friday - social distancing ? No mention of that

News 100 redBy Staff

July 13th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

CineStarz - popcorn

Expect the pop corn to be available. Some notice on how social distance seating will be handled would have been useful.

Cinestarz Upper Canada, the movie theatre on Brant, published their schedule early this morning. First feature is on Friday.

An interesting run of films but not a word on how seating will be handled or what they have taken in the way of social distancing.

An unfortunate corporate practice.

Shortly after publishing this story we learned of the Stratford Festival announcement of their plans to open.  Prominently displayed on their web site was the protocol they will follow to protect those who attend live theatre.  Something similar should appear soon on the CineStarz web site.

 

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New items added to the City's Lending Library program - courtesy Tim Hortons

News 100 blueBy Staff

July 12th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

More play equipment available to borrow through the Lending Library, thanks to donation from Tim Hortons
Burlington residents can now borrow more play equipment from the City’s Lending Library program, located at Brant Hills Community Centre at 2255 Brant St.

Thanks to a donation from Tim Hortons, the City was able to purchase more equipment, so now more families can play together, get outside and try new activities.

The play equipment is available to borrow for free (with a credit card deposit) for a one-week period. Equipment bookings can only be made online. Pick up and drop off is located at the east entrance, through Duncaster Drive. All items are disinfected between each use.

Bikes and Pickle Ball equipment can be picked up at the Seniors’ Centre

For a complete list of play equipment available to borrow, visit online reservations. Check the website regularly as new items are frequently being added.

Examples of equipment to borrow:

Play lend scope

A telescope is expensive – before buying one you might want to borrow what the city has in its Lending Library.

• Archery set
• Beginners astronomy kit
• Bird watching kit
• Giant outdoor matching game
• Large Connect 4 game
• Lawn darts
• Portable practice target net
• Stilts set
• Bikes, including a three-wheeled bicycle

For more information on the Lending Library program, visit burlington.ca/playlending.

Link to the site showing what is available is HERE

 

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The first 'LIVE' entertainment - educational based event announced

artsorange 100x100By Pepper Parr

July 12th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

They have been offering programs for young people and putting on theatrical performances at the Performing Arts Centre that has been some of the best seen on those stages.

The only thing missing was a larger audience.

KooGle cast

Koogle has put on some of the best summer theatre fare the city has ever seen.

The Putnam County Spelling Bee, staged in 2015, was one of the smartest summer entertainment events this critic has seen at the Performing Arts Centre.

Like everyone else, Koogle is edging out of the lockdown offering a virtual program for July and a live program for August.

Hopefully the move in the 3rd stage that starts on Friday will hold and we get to the point where a normal normal begins to be real.

Details on their July virtual program can be found below

Koogle July program

The August program is going to be live – location not determined yet – details below.

Koogle August events

Register HERE for the July virtual program

Register HERE for the August LIVE program

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City council hears from an Indigenous Elder on the matter of renaming parks and schools.

SwP thumbnail graphicBy Pepper Parr

July 9th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Standing Committee on Environment, Infrastructure and Community Services met earlier this week and almost swooned as they listened to Stephen Paquette talk about why the Ryerson school and the park adjacent to it should be renamed.

The Councillors and the two school board trustees who took part as delegations were like high school students listening to a rock star.

paquette Stephen

Stephen Paquette.

Paquette on the other hand was sensible and balanced.

Sure he took a strong position on the getting rid of the Ryerson name but he said he could live with statues of Sir John remaining providing there was a plaque beside the statue putting the man’s role in context.

Unfortunately many are not as sensible and balanced as Paquette.

He taught the Councillors some important lessons; one being the way we choose to elevate some people and create a statue and put it in a public place without a full understanding of the person. He seemed to be saying the statues were more adulation than realistic accounting of the person.

The fear I have is that we will rename the park and the school and then move on to something else forgetting what the real issue is – first making amends for the harm we created and then giving the Indigenous people what they deserve. Decent housing and water they can drink.

A number of years ago Gord Downie stood on a stage and implored the Prime Minister who was in the audience to take care of the Indigenous people. And how much has been done for those people since that time?

I look to Paquette being the person who keeps our feet to the flame and helps us get to the point where the members of the First Nation are true equals.

I was impressed with the man – he is an Elder serving as a staff consultant with the Halton District School Board. He is an excellent spokesperson for his people.

Joseph Boyden, wrote a book: The Orenda. It is a hard book to read on the relationship between the Jesuits who came to Canada to civilize the “savages”. There was painful cruelty on both sides. Boyden created significant controversy writing on Indigenous people. Boyden is primarily of Irish and Scottish ancestry. A number of Indigenous writers and researchers came forward to publicly state Boyden did not have the right to speak on behalf of any Indigenous community because he was not a First Nations citizen and ultimately not Indigenous.

We are going to be dogged with controversy on the question of how we atone for some time. Hopefully the plight of the Indigenous people gets improved while we squabble.

Salt with Pepper is the musings, reflections and opinions of the publisher of the Burlington Gazette, an online newspaper that was formed in 2010 and is a member of the National Newsmedia Council.

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City beginning to plan for events - sign that the restrictions might be easing up soon

News 100 blueBy Staff

June 9th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

On April 10th of next year the people of Burlington will gather at the Cenotaph just north of city hall and celebrate the 100-year anniversary of the Cenotaph. The creation of the monument was the result of a large community driven initiative to honour the resident veterans that fought in World War 1.

The initiative brought together service organizations, churches and residents to raise the funds and commission the works, a true community effort.

Keenleyside with partial monument

Ed Keenleyside knows more about the Cenotaph and how it came into being. So much that he convinced the city to print copies of the book and make it available to the public.

Last year the city entered into an agreement to print copies of a book written by Ed Keenleyside on the history of the cenotaph and how it came into being.

There was discussion at a Standing Committee earlier this week about using the anniversary of the community spirit that brought about the Cenotaph and tying it to the same community spirit that is getting the city through the pandemic.

The Standing Committee decided the Cenotaph celebration should be a stand-alone event.

The area around the Cenotaph is to be identified in future as Veteran Square; (Not Veteran”s”)

April 9 is Vimy Ridge Day in Canada.

The Battle of Vimy Ridge is Canada’s most celebrated military victory. An often mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness.

There are two oak trees that were grown from seeds taken from trees in France at the Vimy Memorial; a piece of land that the French government deeded to Canada.

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Now you know -

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 6th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

It is said that it is the little things that count.

And when you gotta – you gotta – but where.
Council spent a considerable amount of time crafting the decision as to what would be opened up to the public and how it would be paid for.
Those washrooms have to be cleaned much more often if there is heavy traffic.

washrooms downtown.

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Emerging artist completes a watercolour collection - wants to try doing something similar with acrylics

artsblue 100x100By Pepper Parr

July 6th, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

In the art world you look for that promising undiscovered artist and buy their work because you like it and wait for the value of the piece you bought to appreciate.

Making some money is nice but the satisfaction of discovering the artist on your own and making a purchase, maybe a couple, and waiting – and of course enjoying the art for the beauty and talent that spoke to you is what art collecting is really all about.

Lana H&S

Lana Kamaric

I have been watching a young artist for a number of years.  I first met her at the No Vacancy event that took place in the Village Square a number of years ago;  she was standing in the doorway to a space where her work was displayed.  When she saw me she darted out and said: “You’re Pepper Parr and I have a bone to pick with you.”

I’ve forgotten what it was she was unhappy about – but I admired the chutzpah and kept in touch.  From time to time she would send me samples of her work.

She is into what I call science fiction comic books – she calls it something else.   She celebrates The Fourth and likes to dress up as if were Halloween.

 

Kamaric at event - wild

Lana Kamaric on the right at the 2019 Fan Expo.  She is part of the Steam Punk Bat Gang

Kamaric recently sent us a collection of watercolor works – there were nine pieces in the collection.  Several of them impressed me and I wondered if they would be shown anywhere.  Then I wondered – is there a space in Burlington where the work done by emerging arts can be displayed.  Things are in a mild state of chaos at the AGB – maybe when things settle down the idea can be chatted up.

Kamaric explains what she has been up to: “I accidentally painted a watercolour series.

focus

“Focus” on paper 12 inches x 12 inches. All the watercolours are the same size

“This was a concept I was thinking about a year ago and couldn’t quite figure out. I’m fascinated by the subconscious mind and how it shapes our conscious decisions and wanted to explore that. I now realize the problem was the fact that I was actively thinking about it with my conscious mind. It wasn’t until I stopped thinking and started painting that the idea took shape.

“I was three paintings into the series before I realized what I was doing. What began as an experiment in watercolour portrait techniques quickly became a dive into the human psyche.

questions misplaced

“Questions misplaced”

“Watercolours are rebellious and don’t always do what they’re told, but that’s also what makes them fun.

“You can swim upstream and struggle to reach your destination or you can surrender to the current and see where it takes you. This series reminded me to trust the process because it always ends up somewhere interesting.

“I’m currently revisiting the portraits with acrylics to see how the medium will shift the outcome.”

You can reach Lana at lanakamaric@gmail.com.  If you like her style and are interested in her doing a commissioned portrait – she will take your call.

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Jazz on the BPAC Patio in August - plans are in the works.

News 100 yellowBy Pepper Parr

July 2nd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

There is light at the end of the pandemic tunnel we are in.

And it has the sweet sound of a saxophone and the voice of a brilliant jazz vocalist.

Barbara Lica JAzz BPAC AI got curious yesterday and wondered if things were improving enough for some of the traditional summer entertainment fare to return – so I sent a note to the folks at the Performing Arts Centre, where Tammy Fox runs the show, asking if the Jazz on the Patio might return in August.

Tammy Fox hands-out-768x578

Plans are underway for Jazz on the Patio at the Performing Arts Centre

Here it is – straight from the horse’s mouth:

“Yes, it’s looking positive for outdoor concerts on The plaza for August. Planning is underway. Can’t wait!!”

And neither can we.

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Local Art being Commissioned for Waterfront Trail along the Beachway

News 100 yellowBy Staff

July 2nd, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Beachway is getting a lot of attention these days.

Lovely part of the city – just find a parking spot when you get there.

In the not too distant future we should be seeing some local art to brighten the place up

The city sent out a Request for Proposals for Temporary Public Art Signs at The Beachway

Deadline: Friday July 30, 2021

Budget: $500 (design only), 15 commissions available

Here’s the fine print:

The City of Burlington public art program is launching a temporary art project, RE:DE(SIGN) as part of the 2021 Culture Days. Running from September 24 – October 24, Culture Days is 4 weeks of arts and culture experiences indoors, outdoors and online.

Waterfront Trail - from east - few people

This quiet path was once where two railway tracks carried freight from Burlington to the rest of the world. Freeman Station was one of the stops.

This project will commission 15 Burlington artists to create small-scale works that will be installed on signposts along the Waterfront Trail, stretching from Beachway Park to the Lift Bridge. This project will provide trail users with a safe and accessible way to enjoy art and to learn more about the amazing creators in our community. Each artwork will be accompanied with a profile of the artist.

This call is open to Burlington-based artists and is open to all art forms that can be presented in a sign format. This includes, but is not limited to: visual art, graphic art, photography, poetry, writing, etc. Sound-based work such as music, spoken word, theatre, etc. may also be presented using QR codes.

Project Goals

The theme for the 2021 Culture Days is RE:IMAGINE. Arts and culture emerged as a lifeline of joy, providing gifts of colour, hope, and reprieve needed to make it through this past year. Collectively, we’re imagining what a post-pandemic world could look like and how we can each contribute to that picture being brighter. Through that lens, Culture Days has chosen RE:IMAGINE as the very apt 2021 theme.

RE:IMAGINE signals a positive turning point – the commitment to building tangible change into the future of arts and culture.
Artists submitting proposals for RE:DE(SIGN) should take inspiration from the RE:IMAGINE theme.

Is this a big part of the dream the Mayor is looking for? How big a part of the city is the waterfront? Is it more than just something to look at?

The Art work will be placed along the Waterfront Trail right up to the canal.

Additionally, the artwork should:

Be easily legible to pedestrian traffic, artwork that incorporates text must adhere to AODA (Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act) guidelines.

The artwork must be suitable for presentation in a public space, for all ages (i.e., the artwork may not contain profanity, hate speech, graphic imagery, etc.)

Important! Please read the full Call for Artists document (Click HERE to download PDF) before submitting an application as this contains important project details and application instructions.

Submit your Application Online

Applications may be submitted online, using Submittable. Click HERE  to start your online application. You will need to create a free account to use Submittable. Please contact Kim Selman, 905-515-9334 or kim@cobaltconnects.ca if you need assistance with your application.

The Beachway is a storied part of Burlington.  It was once a self-sustaining community of several thousand people.  You can search the Gazette Archives for stories on what life was like in that community

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Sound of Music broadcasts local artists as part of Canada Day celebrations

News 100 blueBy Maddy Van Clieaf

July 1, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

 

The Sound of Music and the City of Burlington got together to let people hear some of the Sound as part of Canada Day Celebrations.

The smell of funnel cake, strums of guitar and thump of the bass that consumes Spencer Smith Park when the Sound is live was missing but local bands old and new, from Carly Rae Jepson to the Spoons, Terri Clark, and Lonestar to the rising group Grandson, the Sound of Music is where family, friends and music lovers join together to celebrate the vibrant arts scene in Burlington and beyond.

Instead of enjoying the cool breeze and unavoidable mud coating the bottom of every pair of sneakers- for it’s not the Sound of Music without rainfall beforehand- the authentic sound of Burlington can be heard from the comfort of your living room.

Hayley Verrall - standing with guitar

Hayley Verrall

Uploaded onto soundofmusic.ca,  (CLICK HERE) a video with live performances from nine different local bands and performers can be streamed. The mix of performers comprises fresh faces Abby J Hall and Hayley Verrall, with Burlington staples Bliss and Suzie McNeil. The artists perform both original pieces and covers of famous CANCON songs from the likes of Blue Rodeo and Joni Mitchell.

Included in the music stream are interviews from previous festivals, introducing a wave of nostalgia and reminiscing past years. The online format can’t fully capture the magical ambiance of roaring crowds and mosh pits, but it highlights rising local talent and gives a taste of what is to come. Anticipation for upcoming SOM festivals vibrates through the live stream.

Suzie McNeil

Suzie McNeil

In addition to the live stream, the Sound of Music has put together a Spotify playlist full of Canadian hits available here.  There is also an interactive music experience through QR codes scattered about hiking trails and public spaces.

Andrea Ruthart, Kakisheway, from White Bear Treaty number 4, Cree Nation, made an impactful guest appearance to speak about the Hope for Healing project, helped by the City of Burlington. She and other Indigenous community members spoke on the meaning of reconciliation and the Indigenous song performed at Spencer Smith the day prior.

“This started with burning sweetgrass and blessing the land, and a song, which is also a prayer and a blessing, and a poem, and a call to action. The song was about the fire dance; it was about being seen and heard, which the indigenous community in our country for decades was not.   “Mayor Marianne Meed Ward explained, “Music is a way to bridge that.”

The segment is sincere, although no Indigenous music was played or performed during the live stream. While the City of Burlington is celebrating, Indigenous communities in Canada are choosing not to recognize Canada Day this year to reflect and mourn the tragedy of residential schools and their legacy, which continues to plague Canada.

For Indigenous voices in the community to be heard and recognized, they need to be played and celebrated. The Sound of Music offers a large platform to do just that. Without true change and recognition of Indigenous artists in Burlington, the path to reconciliation will be a long one in the arts sphere.

 

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Sound of Music being produced at Nuvo One - line up isn't all that clear at this point

eventsred 100x100By Pepper Parr

July 1st, 2021

BURLINGTON, ON

We think there is a Sound of Music program for Canada Day – and we think it starts at 10:00 am but we are not certain.

The SoM web site has a lot of promises and build up to the events for the day but there is no schedule.

Here is what we do have:

“Tomorrow it’s a day filled with local artists, playlist tunes and big announcements of Summer shows ahead. Follow our social feeds and the website beginning at 10:00am.”

From Nuvo One

This is the sound stage for the 2021 Sound of Music Festival.

We understand the events are taking place in the Sound of Music studio at Nuvo One – best we can give you at this point is a link and hope it gets you some groovy music.

Canada Day announcement LIVE

This is the plan – the link to the site is set out above. Good Luck.

One of the SoM fans put it this way:

Comment on July 1st event

 

 

 

maddyMadeleine Van Clieaf, Maddy to everyone, is part of a group of students working at the Gazette as part of the Local Journalism Initiative funded by the federal government.  Maddy is a second year journalism student at Carleton University and will return to class in the fall.

Maddy graduated from Assumption High School and was a member of the Burlington Teen Tour Band

 

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